Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Regina Ferreira Alves, Catarina Samorinha and José Precioso

The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviors about COVID-19 among Portuguese higher education students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviors about COVID-19 among Portuguese higher education students.

Design/methodology/approach

In May 2020, all students from a Portuguese University were invited to participate in completing an online questionnaire. A total of 262 students participated. COVID-19 related knowledge, attitudes toward COVID-19 and preventive behaviors were assessed. Differences between outcomes and sociodemographics were analyzed through independent t-tests and the ANOVA. A generalized linear model was calculated to determine the predictive variables of preventive behaviors.

Findings

Students revealed good knowledge about COVID-19, correctly answering 13.06 (SD = 1.25) questions in a total of 14 and favorable attitudes toward preventive behaviors (M = 32.73, SD = 2.88). Students reported always engaging in, on average, 5.81 (SD = 2.61) of the 12 behavior analyzed. Females presented higher levels of knowledge, more positive attitudes and engaged in more preventive behaviors than males. Being a bachelor's (Exp (β) = 8.213, 95% CI: 1.791–37.670, p < 0.01) or a master's degree student (Exp (β) = 7.568, 95% CI: 1.598–35.835, p < 0.05) and having positive attitudes toward preventive behavior of COVID-19 predicted the adoption of those preventive behavior (Exp (β) = 1.340, 95% CI: 1.189–1.510, p < 0.001).

Originality/value

This study provides useful data to plan health education programs about COVID-19 among higher education students. The continuous investment by universities in preventive campaigns is essential to promote good preventive behaviors in the next academic year.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 December 2019

Jacquie McGraw, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Katherine M. White

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of masculine identity in generating value destruction and diminished well-being in a preventative health service.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of masculine identity in generating value destruction and diminished well-being in a preventative health service.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used five focus groups with 39 Australian men aged between 50 and 74 years. Men’s participation in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program informed the sample frame. In total, 12 Jungian male archetypes were used to identify different masculine identities.

Findings

Thematic analysis of the data revealed three themes of masculinity that explain why men destroy value by avoiding the use of a preventative health services including: rejection of the service reduces consumer disempowerment and emasculation, active rejection of resources creates positive agency and suppressing negative self-conscious emotions protects the self.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the single context of bowel cancer screening. Future research could investigate value destruction in other preventative health contexts such as testicular cancer screening, sexual health screening and drug abuse.

Practical implications

Practical implications include fostering consumer empowerment when accessing services, developing consumer resources to create positive agency and boosting positive self-conscious emotions by promoting positive social norms.

Originality/value

This research is the first known study to explore how value is destroyed in men’s preventative health using the perspective of gender identity. This research also is the first to explore value destruction as an emotion regulation strategy.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Nadia Zainuddin, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Josephine Previte

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of multiple actors in the value creation process for a preventative health service, and observe the subsequent impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of multiple actors in the value creation process for a preventative health service, and observe the subsequent impact on key service outcomes of satisfaction and customer behaviour intentions to use a preventative health service again in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

An online self-completion survey of Australian women (n=797) was conducted to test the proposed framework in the context of a free, government-provided breastscreening service. Data were analysed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM).

Findings

The findings indicate that functional and emotional value are created from organisational and customer resources. These findings indicate that health service providers and customers are jointly responsible for the successful creation of value, leading to desirable outcomes for all stakeholders.

Practical implications

The results highlight to health professionals the aspects of service that can be managed in order to create value with target audiences. The findings also indicate the importance of the resources provided by users in the creation of value, signifying the importance of customer education and management.

Originality/value

This study provides a significant contribution to social marketing through the provision of an empirically validated model of value creation in a preventative health service. The model demonstrates how the creation and provision of value can lead to the achievement of desirable social behaviours – a key aim of social marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Jessica Mayer, Nadia Zainuddin, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Rory Francis Mulcahy

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of perceived threat, brand congruence, and social support on consumer coping strategies for a preventative health service.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of perceived threat, brand congruence, and social support on consumer coping strategies for a preventative health service.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 570 women aged over 50 in one Australian state was conducted (users and non-users of the service). The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

A competing models approach reveals that threat on its own is associated with avoidance coping; however, when brand congruence is high, there is an association with active coping. Social support appears to have a buffering effect on threat and is associated positively with active coping and negatively with avoidance coping.

Originality/value

The study findings suggest that threat appeals should be used with caution in increasing participation in transformative preventative health services due to its double-edged sword effect (increasing both avoidance and active coping). When consumers have social support, this results in active coping and buffers avoidance coping. This research offers useful insights for social marketing and transformative service research.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Yam B. Limbu, C. Jayachandran, Christopher McKinley and Jeonghwan Choi

People living on poverty-level incomes in developing nations face unique health challenges as compared to those in developed nations. New insights emerge from a bottom of…

Abstract

Purpose

People living on poverty-level incomes in developing nations face unique health challenges as compared to those in developed nations. New insights emerge from a bottom of the pyramid context (India) where culture-based health notions, preventive orientation and health resources differ from developed western health orientations and resources. The purpose of this paper is to explore how structural and cognitive social capital indirectly influence preventive health behavior (PHB) through perceived health value.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants for this study include rural people from Tamil Nadu, a state of India who are classified as those living below poverty level based on a per capita/per day consumption expenditure of Rupees 22.50 (an equivalent of US$0.40 a per capita/per day) (Planning Commission, Government of India, 2012). The study included a total number of 635 participants (312 males and 323 females). Relatively a high response rate (79 percent) was achieved through personal contacts and telephone solicitation, cash incentive and multiple follow-ups. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing structural and cognitive social capital, preventative health behavior, perceived health value, and health locus of control (HLC).

Findings

The results show that perceived health value mediates the relationship between cognitive social capital and PHB. Specifically, cognitive social capital influences BoP people’s assessment of benefits of engaging in PHB, that, in turn, influences PHB. In addition, the findings showed that HLC moderates the effect of social capital on PHB. Social capital positively related to enhanced PHB only among those who believe that health outcomes are controllable.

Originality/value

The authors findings indicate that cognitive social capital has enormous potential in promoting health intervention and the health of poor communities, a sentiment shared by prior researchers (Glenane-Antoniadis et al., 2003; Fisher et al., 2004; Martin et al., 2004; Weitzman and Kawachi, 2000). Overall, from a theoretical, empirical and methodological perspective, the current study offers a unique contribution to the social capital and PHB literature. First, drawing from the HBM and HLC, the findings provide a more nuanced explanation of how distinct aspects of social capital predict PHB. Specifically, the relationship between social capital and PHB is qualified by the extent one perceives personal control over her health. In addition, the cognitive component of social capital influences PHB through perceptions of health value.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Manel Ben Ayed and Nibrass El Aoud

As the emotional/experiential aspect is still marginalized in the literature, this paper aims to explore the role of negative emotions associated with past experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

As the emotional/experiential aspect is still marginalized in the literature, this paper aims to explore the role of negative emotions associated with past experiences (PEs) in explaining the preventive health behavior (PHB) of the consumers with a chronic disease.

Design/methodology/approach

From the perspective of experiential marketing, a multi-method exploratory study was conducted among consumers with type 2 diabetes. The investigation process applied phenomenological interviews, visual projections and consumer diaries to adequately capture the emotional responses related to consumer experience of healthy diet behavior.

Findings

The results of a methodological triangulation show that the generation of negative emotions associated with PE with the PHB stimulates adopting healthy eating behavior rather than restraining it.

Research limitations/implications

The multi-method protocol chosen for this experiential study is a response to the methodological requirements for a broader conception of consumer experience in the context of chronic diseases. This protocol can be used for further empirical investigation of emotional reactions experienced in consumer behavior in the broad sense.

Practical implications

Managerial implications are provided for health-care professionals on how to implement marketing strategies and practices based on the identified consumer profiles.

Originality/value

This study highlights the significant role of experienced emotional responses in explaining the adoption of the PHB and underlines that not all decisions are rational. It also contributes to the literature by specifying a mixed-method approach of data collection for deeper investigation of the consumer’s emotional responses to the health behavior experience.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Suku Bhaskaran and Felicity Hardley

Builds on past studies in the USA and assesses the market potential for functional goods through investigating consumer needs and attitudes. Aims to add to past research…

Abstract

Builds on past studies in the USA and assesses the market potential for functional goods through investigating consumer needs and attitudes. Aims to add to past research through: assessing consumer knowledge and beliefs on nutrition and diet‐health relationships; analysing the influence of such knowledge and beliefs of information and sources of information; and evaluating the effectiveness and implications of government preventative health campaigns on purchase behaviour. Concludes that issues regarding personal and national health are extremely important because of the financial costs and human suffering that could be involved; and that functional goods, as a relatively new phenomenon, still need to be examined further with regard to their influence on trust and legitimacy in buyer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Janet Davey, Judith Herbst, Raechel Johns, Joy Parkinson, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Nadia Zainuddin

Despite the availability and accessibility of standardized screening services, such as preventative health services, many individuals avoid participation. The extant health

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the availability and accessibility of standardized screening services, such as preventative health services, many individuals avoid participation. The extant health literature has indicated that health locus of control (HLOC) influences engagement and uptake of health services. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the microfoundation, HLOC, contributes to value co-creation via service-generated and self-generated activities in standardized screening services.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 25 consumers who have experienced one of the three standardized screening services in Australia was undertaken, followed by thematic analysis of the data.

Findings

Service-generated activities elicit reactive responses from consumers – compliance and relinquishing control – but when customers lead co-creation activities, their active responses emphasize protecting self and others, understanding relationship needs and gaining control. Consumers with high internal HLOC are more likely to take initiative for their health, take active control of the process and feel empowered through participating. Consumers with low internal HLOC, in contrast, require more motivation for participation, including encouragement from powerful others through promotion or interpersonal dialogue.

Social implications

These findings can be used by policymakers and providers of preventative health services for the betterment of citizen health.

Originality/value

The integration of the DART framework, customer value co-creation activities, and the delineation of self-generated and service-generated activities provides a holistic framework to understand the influence of HLOC on the co-creation of value in standardized screening services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Tse-Chuan Yang, I-Chien Chen and Aggie J. Noah

Recently, the institutional performance model has been used to explain the increased distrust of health care system by arguing that distrust is a function of individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the institutional performance model has been used to explain the increased distrust of health care system by arguing that distrust is a function of individuals’ perceptions on the quality of life in neighborhood and social institutions. We examined (1) whether individuals assess two dimensions of distrust consistently, (2) if the multilevel institutional performance model explains the variation of distrust across neighborhoods, and (3) how distrust patterns affect preventive health care behaviors.

Methodology

Using data from 9,497 respondents in 914 census tracts (neighborhoods) in Philadelphia, we examined the patterns of how individuals evaluate the competence and values distrust using the Multilevel Latent Class Analysis (MLCA), and then investigated how neighborhood environment factors are associated with distrust patterns. Finally, we used regression to examine the relationships between distrust patterns and preventive health care.

Findings

The MLCA identified four distrust patterns: Believers, Doubters, Competence Skeptics, and Values Skeptics. We found that 55 percent of the individuals evaluated competence and values distrust coherently, with Believers reporting low levels and Doubters having high levels of distrust. Competence and Values Skeptics assessed distrust inconsistently. Believers were the least likely to reside in socioeconomically disadvantaged and racially segregated neighborhoods among these patterns. In contrast to Doubters, Believers were more likely to use preventive health care, even after controlling for other socioeconomic factors including insurance coverage.

Practical implications

Our findings suggest that distrust patterns are a function of neighborhood conditions and distrust patterns are associated with preventive health care. This study provides important policy implications for health care and future interventions.

Details

Education, Social Factors, and Health Beliefs in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-367-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Ana Paola Sanchez-Lezama, Judith Cavazos-Arroyo, Cidronio Albavera-Hernández, Aarón Salinas-Rodríguez, Mario Lagunes-Pérez and Beatriz Perez-Armendariz

– The purpose of this paper is to determine which socioecological factors encourage rural women to participate in mammographies rather than avoiding taking the test.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine which socioecological factors encourage rural women to participate in mammographies rather than avoiding taking the test.

Design/methodology/approach

The study mainly uses data from the 2007 Rural Households Evaluation Survey (ENCEL-2007). These crossover data are analyzed using the framework proposed in the Spatial-Interaction Model of Mammography Use (SIMMU), through a three-level logistic regression model to examine the likelihood that a woman will choose to participate in a mammography.

Findings

At the woman-household level, the completion of the Pap smear and the asset index is the strongest determinant of mammography participation. Obtaining preventive medicine services or being enrolled in the Popular Insurance System prevent women from undergoing screening. At the interpersonal level, the probability of screening use decreases with lower social coverage. At the intermediate level, availability of health centers is negatively related to the use of screening.

Research limitations/implications

The study fails to take into account the fact that women’s propensity to have a mammography may vary over time relatively to life changes. Moreover, findings were restricted to women ages from 40 to 49 and limited due to the lack of published data or data quality issues.

Practical implications

The results of this research can give health planners, policymakers and social marketers a platform for how to approach social change and promote the cancer screening health behavior through the marketing mix (price, place, promotion and product) in the design of their programs.

Originality/value

In addition to be informative and persuasive with people to change their behavior, this paper also seeks to provide a direction for using commercial marketing tools through social marketing to “sell” the health behavior. Due to target population variation, this paper addresses the health behavior change strategy by audience segmentation, regarded as essential to successful health communication campaigns.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000