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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Christoph Becker, Luis Faria and Kresimir Duretec

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of…

Abstract

Purpose

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of content over time. This article identifies a number of gaps in the systems and mechanisms currently available and presents a new, innovative architecture for scalable decision-making and control in such environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates the state of the art in preservation planning and monitoring, highlights the key challenges faced by repositories to provide scalable decision-making and monitoring facilities, and presents the contributions of the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite to provide such capabilities.

Findings

The presented architecture makes preservation planning and monitoring context-aware through a semantic representation of key organizational factors, and integrates this with a business intelligence system that collects and reasons upon preservation-relevant information.

Research limitations/implications

The architecture has been implemented in the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite. Integration with repositories and external information sources provide powerful preservation capabilities that can be freely integrated with virtually any repository.

Practical implications

The open nature of the software suite enables stewardship organizations to integrate the components with their own preservation environments and to contribute to the ongoing improvement of the systems.

Originality/value

The paper reports on innovative research and development to provide preservation capabilities. The results enable proactive, continuous preservation management through a context-aware planning and monitoring cycle integrated with operational systems.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Ria Groenewald and Amelia Breytenbach

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the awareness about digital preservation and what must be done towards preserving valuable original digital material. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the awareness about digital preservation and what must be done towards preserving valuable original digital material. The paper also aims to discuss the use of metadata principles and the implementation of tools for the preservation of documents stored on personal computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data loss prevention starts with the creation of a digital object. However, methods to minimize the loss of digital data are often ignored, the use of metadata structures embedded in digital objects from the outset thereof are recommended as a starting point towards good preservation principles. The need to create awareness on the issue of digital preservation was promoted by the authors at various occasions during 2008, as the number of incidents of data loss and costs involved continue to be of concern to all involved. Whether the loss occurs by a malicious attempt, or an inadvertent mistake, it can be diminishing either personally or to the institute/company where it occurs. Data were collected through a digital questionnaire and literature studies were done on several strategies, policies and best practices. Personal visits to libraries actively working on digital preservation and curation formed a basis for conducting the study. The implementation of tools that can be used to preserve and retrieve digital content by individuals was also investigated.

Findings

Digital objects should be archived with metadata about the object and the creation thereof. Metadata need not necessarily be structured and controlled when used by individuals or small groups for preservation of self owned data. The metadata content, however, should describe the object, the method of creation and technologies used in the creation. All changes to the document should be captured in the preservation metadata. Future access to digital content does not only depend on one preservation method but on a sequence of strategies and methods applied to the digital content.

Originality/value

The paper provides a broad overview of certain aspects that must be considered when implementing digital preservation strategies. The value of metadata needs to be widely accepted and implemented and the use thereof promoted to creators of personal digital objects.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

David Maynard Gerrard, James Edward Mooney and Dave Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to consider how digital preservation system architectures will support business analysis of large-scale collections of preserved resources…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how digital preservation system architectures will support business analysis of large-scale collections of preserved resources, and the use of Big Data analyses by future researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the architecture of existing systems, then discusses experimental surveys of large digital collections using existing digital preservation tools at Big Data scales. Finally, it introduces the design of a proposed new architecture to work with Big Data volumes of preserved digital resources – also based upon experience of managing a collection of 30 million digital images.

Findings

Modern visualisation tools enable business analyses based on file-related metadata, but most currently available systems need more of this functionality “out-of-the-box”. Scalability of preservation architecture to Big Data volumes depends upon the ability to run preservation processes in parallel, so indexes that enable effective sub-division of collections are vital. Not all processes scale easily: those that do not require complex management.

Practical implications

The complexities caused by scaling up to Big Data volumes can be seen as being at odds with preservation, where simplicity matters. However, the sustainability of preservation systems relates directly to their usefulness, and maintaining usefulness will increasingly depend upon being able to process digital resources at Big Data volumes. An effective balance between these conflicting situations must be struck.

Originality/value

Preservation systems are at a step-change as they move to Big Data scale architectures and respond to more technical research processes. This paper is a timely illustration of the state of play at this pivotal moment.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Economics of Art and Culture Invited Papers at the 12th International Conference of the Association of Cultural Economics International
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-995-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Beth Oehlerts and Shu Liu

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of digital archiving and preservation practices and processes successfully implemented at an academic institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of digital archiving and preservation practices and processes successfully implemented at an academic institution.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study chronicles the planning and actions taken to identify, select, package, and archive local digital assets for long‐term access and migration. It includes a literature review and offers selected resources as a starting point for other institutions investigating digital preservation tools and practices.

Findings

Digital preservation is a broad, evolving, and important facet of digital asset management, yet often overlooked by library administration and understated in library operations. Collaborative approaches should be considered in implementing digital preservation tools and processes with limited resources.

Practical implications

What is successfully in operation at CSUL may be learned by other institutions. An effective preservation plan and established workflows will give an organization the capability to maximize limited funds and staff time.

Originality/value

The majority of the current literature provides theories, technologies, conceptual models, and large‐scale collaborations, with relatively little describing needs, practices, operations, and experiences at a specific academic library. This paper will contribute to the literature by discussing digital preservation from actual experience, based on the work we perform, the needs we face, and the solutions we reach within our current environment.

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Amy Rudersdorf

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the “Capture, Ingest, and Checksum” (CINCH) tool, developed by the State Library of North Carolina with funding from a 2011 IMLS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the “Capture, Ingest, and Checksum” (CINCH) tool, developed by the State Library of North Carolina with funding from a 2011 IMLS Sparks! Ignition grant.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes the needs assessment, development, and use cases for the CINCH tool in the digital preservation community. A special emphasis is put on the possible wider adoption of the tool for small and mid‐sized institutions and the call for community building around it.

Findings

CINCH does not relate directly to storage or access, but it does address the need for appropriately formatted SIPs to ensure the fixity, authenticity, and long‐term manageability of our digital assets. As a broadly accessible tool with generalized purpose, its greatest impact will be on small and mid‐sized institutions and organizations that do not now have access to an application of this nature.

Research limitations

CINCH 2.0 planning is already underway. Improving the quality and range of metadata, exploring DRM restrictions, and expanding the types of harvestable files are at the top of the development list.

Practical implications

CINCH will create a Submission Information Package (SIP) to certify that the files ingested are ready for whatever preservation action the institution is capable of performing on them.

Originality/value

CINCH was developed by the State Library of North Carolina and is the only tool of its kind available to the digital preservation community.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Jaana Pinnick

The aim of this paper was to explore digital preservation requirements within the wider National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) organisational framework in preparation for…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper was to explore digital preservation requirements within the wider National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) organisational framework in preparation for developing a preservation policy and integrating associated preservation workflows throughout the existing research data management processes. This case study is based on an MSc dissertation research undertaken at Northumbria University.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed methods case study used quantitative and qualitative data to explore the preservation requirements and triangulation to strengthen the design validity. Corporate and the wider scientific priorities were identified through literature and a stakeholder survey. Organisational preparedness was investigated through staff interviews.

Findings

Stakeholders expect data to be reliable, reusable and available in preferred formats. To ensure digital continuity, the creation of high-quality metadata is critical, and data depositors need data management training to achieve this. Recommendations include completing a risk assessment, creating a digital asset register and a technology watch to mitigate against risks.

Research limitations/implications

The main constraint in this study is the lack of generalisability of results. As the NGDC is a unique organisation, it may not be possible to generalise the organisational findings, although those relating to research data management may be transferrable.

Originality/value

This research examines the specific nature of geoscience data retention requirements and looks at existing NGDC procedures in terms of enhancing digital continuity, providing new knowledge on the preservation requirements for a number of national datasets.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Priscilla Caplan

This paper aims to describe the Florida Digital Archive (FDA), a long‐term preservation repository for the use of the public university system of Florida, and the DAITSS…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the Florida Digital Archive (FDA), a long‐term preservation repository for the use of the public university system of Florida, and the DAITSS preservation repository application used by the FDA. It seeks to explain requirements that shaped DAITSS design, outline functions of the current software, and describe how DAITSS is being rearchitected as a series of Web Services (DAITSS 2). It also endeavours to place the FDA and DAITSS in the context of various models for implementing digital preservation functions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study of one model of digital preservation implementation that includes some comparison with examples of other models. The preservation protocol implemented by DAITSS combines bit‐level preservation, format normalization, and forward format migration; extensive preservation and format‐specific metadata are supported, and authenticity of content is maintained through application design and a complete record of digital provenance.

Findings

The formal OAIS model has much to offer, and DAITSS could be part of a preservation solution for large academic/research libraries and for consortia who can share central computing facilities and staff.

Practical implications

When DAITSS 2 is completed and implemented by the Florida Digital Archive, the code will be released for use under an open source license. Institutions, consortia and third party service providers looking for a more complete preservation solution than simple replication can consider using DAITSS 2 as their digital preservation repository application.

Originality/value

There are very few preservation repository applications that do nothing but digital preservation, do it well, and formally implement the OAIS model. The Florida Digital Archive's DAITSS was the first of its kind in the USA. DAITSS 2 will conform to the same requirements as DAITSS and will retain the same functionality, but it will be easier to implement and manage in production, and easier to maintain and enhance.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Andreas Stanescu

To describe INFORM, a new methodology for investigating and measuring the risk factors of digital formats and providing guidelines for preservation action plans.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe INFORM, a new methodology for investigating and measuring the risk factors of digital formats and providing guidelines for preservation action plans.

Design/methodology/approach

Construction of a model which aims to discover specific threats to preservation and measure their possible impact on preservation decisions. The methodology defines: risk categories of digital formats and their dependencies; risk factors for each category; scales to measure probability of occurrence and impact; and methods to collect, report and interpret the results.

Findings

While individuals are biased and subjective in their aversion to risk, collating the assessments of many individuals should generate group‐consensus or group‐averaged objective results. Hence, preservation plans can be based on objective analysis of risk trends instead of individuals’ opinions developed in the relative isolation of their institutions. The methodology takes into consideration individuals’ aversion to risk, therefore refraining from imposing specific courses of action, but simply making suggestions of possible actions.

Research limitations/implications

A comprehensive approach to the format assessment must also consider, in addition to the risk factors, two other considerations, reflecting the quality of the digital format specification: significant properties of the format under consideration; the features of the format as defined in the format specification. These two aspects will be defined at a later time.

Practical implications

Digital archives, institutional repositories and digital libraries can take advantage of the measurements offered by the INFORM method to select digital formats most apt for long‐term viability. Moreover, by repeating the process, involved parties can detect changes in the threat model over time, to which digital collections managers can act accordingly.

Originality/value

Risk management has been previously used to detect the potential of loss of web resources and has been inspirational to this author. However, this method is the first to use risk factors to measure digital preservation viability of digital formats. The results of the measurements described here can be used by: content creators and publishers, to suggest best formats to use; content curators, to restrict what is collected; content managers, to know in advance how difficult to handle a certain collection may be; and preservation planners, to define and implement preservation plans, in the form of either, migration strategies or short‐term emulation solutions.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Sharon Adam

In this increasingly digital world, archivists have had to reconsider early definitions and measures of authenticity in order to ensure their applicability to the process…

Abstract

Purpose

In this increasingly digital world, archivists have had to reconsider early definitions and measures of authenticity in order to ensure their applicability to the process of preserving digital records. This paper sets out to explore the complexities involved in defining and preserving the authenticity of digital files.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on literature from the field to present a comprehensive overview of traditional definitions of authenticity and highlight the shifting nature of those definitions in the digital age. The discussion begins with a look at traditional archival understandings of authenticity as they relate to physical objects. The paper goes on to examine these challenges and efforts and includes a look at the resource demands and technology tools currently used to evaluate digital authenticity. The paper conducted extensive research on the subject to compile source materials and draw conclusions.

Findings

This paper highlights the inherent challenge of establishing and maintaining pertinent criteria for authenticity when archivists are, for the most part, electing to reformat and effectively change digital records in order to ensure their long‐term preservation.

Practical implications

This paper includes practical implications for redefining, measuring, and preserving the authenticity of digital records.

Social implications

This paper has social implications in that it asserts a need to question the well‐established understanding of what it means to be authentic.

Originality/value

The paper brings together a range of information and presents a comprehensive yet succinct view of the issues involved in defining and preserving digital authenticity, not otherwise found in the literature serving the archive community.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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