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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Ezra Shiloba Gbaje and Zakari Mohammed

The study aims to examine availability, coverage of digital preservation policy and the structures put in place by National Information Centres in Nigeria to preserve…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine availability, coverage of digital preservation policy and the structures put in place by National Information Centres in Nigeria to preserve digital information.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research methodology using a case study approach was adopted. Documentary sources, a semi‐structured questionnaire for the focus group, and interviews were the instruments used to collect data. While a homogeneous sampling of five staff in the digitisation/digital preservation unit was adopted for the focus group interview, only one top management staff member from the rank of Assistant Director of each of the selected three National Information Centres was interviewed.

Findings

The National Bureau of Statistics and the National Library of Nigeria have digital preservation policies. However, the area of coverage of the available policies is not adequate enough to ensure the long‐term preservation of digital information. Similarly, the study revealed that the lack of institutional support from the National Information Centres studied is one of the challenges in the implementation of the digital preservation policy.

Practical implications

For any National Information Centre to ensure the accessibility and reuse of its digital information, it must have a digital preservation policy, without which the active management of digital information will be very challenging and can result in the loss of vital digital information of significant importance.

Originality/value

There is currently no research work addressing issues on digital preservation policy with a particular focus on Nigeria. This paper therefore highlights shortcomings of the available digital preservation policy and proposes a national digital preservation policy that will chart a road map for effective digital preservation activities in any National Information Centre.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Virginia A. Dressler

Digital preservation is a term that is a bit of an enigma to many people both in and out of the digital arena, but it will undoubtedly be important in an increasingly…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital preservation is a term that is a bit of an enigma to many people both in and out of the digital arena, but it will undoubtedly be important in an increasingly all-digital world. The underlying work relating to digital preservation is essential to the long-term care of digital media, but who is charged with addressing this type of work, and can policy serve to structure and also reflect this complex concept? The main point of interest for this study is to examine existing digital preservation policies at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) institutions and analyze the content of the policies. The purpose will be to determine if these policies are able to provide a robust framework for true digital preservation work at this point in time. First, an introduction is made to provide the structure of the study and background. Next, a literature review is provided, followed by an outline of the methods and results of the study, and finally a conclusion with recommendations for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of digital preservation policy at ARL institutions is conducted, with recommendations provided for further research.

Findings

This study was an attempt to highlight the current state of digital preservation policies, reviewing both the positive elements and the shortcomings of policies at ARL member institutions. The call for policies made for this study resulted in finding that 32 (26 per cent) ARL institutions currently have a digital preservation policy in place, from the institutions that responded (58 per cent response rate). In total, 23/40 institutions without a current policy indicate there is, or will be, work to complete a policy within the coming year (2016-2017). A call can be made at this time for more in-depth research and analysis of the policies for further inquiry. Both effective (University of Houston, University of Florida, York University) and ineffective (Colorado State University, University of Texas, Virginia Tech) digital preservation policies were discovered during the course of the study, with many policies falling somewhere in the middle. Many institutions provided a good template for digital preservation but lacked details for how this work would be addressed and who would be completing such work.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to ARL member institutions at the time of the study (January 2016).

Originality/value

There is currently a gap in analysis and research of digital preservation policies. This is an area of active policy creation for many institutions, and it will likely be a growing area for researchers to examine.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Paul Eden, John Feather and Graham Matthews

Discusses the results of a questionnaire survey into preservationpolicies and practice in British libraries, focusing on responsibilityfor preservation, preservation

Abstract

Discusses the results of a questionnaire survey into preservation policies and practice in British libraries, focusing on responsibility for preservation, preservation policies, disaster control planning, staff training and user education, co‐operative initiatives, factors inhibiting preservation activity and spending on preservation. Findings indicate that preservation is considered most applicable to special collections and to rare or valuable items, and that funding is a major problem even in libraries with a strong commitment to preservation. Increased activity in areas such as disaster control planning indicate a greater awareness of preservation issues than in the past. Highlights the advantages of written preservation policies and the success of co‐operative initiatives such as Newsplan, suggesting that a national preservation policy would enable libraries to take a more rational approach to problems such as what to preserve and funding allocation, while helping to clarify their national heritage responsibilities.

Details

Library Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Laerte Pereira da Silva Júnior and Maria Manuel Borges

This paper aims to verify the implementation of digital preservation policies at the institutional repositories (IRs) of Brazilian Federal Universities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to verify the implementation of digital preservation policies at the institutional repositories (IRs) of Brazilian Federal Universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used involved the verification of the information available in the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR) and on the websites of the IRs, to confirm the existence of published digital preservation policies. In this study, a sample of the 26 IRs of Brazilian Federal Universities registered with OpenDOAR, which represents 68 per cent of these repositories, was used.

Findings

The main conclusion is that the IRs of these universities do not have any published digital preservation policies, even though some repositories state their intention of preserving digital material in their institutional information policy.

Originality/value

The stakeholders of IRs need to implement a programme to guide their activities to preserve digital materials in the long term. In fact, similar to examples worldwide, this programme should take the form of an institutional commitment outlined in a digital preservation policy. IRs at Brazilian Federal Universities still have a long way to go to guarantee access to digital materials in the long term.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Christoph Becker, Luis Faria and Kresimir Duretec

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of…

Abstract

Purpose

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of content over time. This article identifies a number of gaps in the systems and mechanisms currently available and presents a new, innovative architecture for scalable decision-making and control in such environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates the state of the art in preservation planning and monitoring, highlights the key challenges faced by repositories to provide scalable decision-making and monitoring facilities, and presents the contributions of the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite to provide such capabilities.

Findings

The presented architecture makes preservation planning and monitoring context-aware through a semantic representation of key organizational factors, and integrates this with a business intelligence system that collects and reasons upon preservation-relevant information.

Research limitations/implications

The architecture has been implemented in the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite. Integration with repositories and external information sources provide powerful preservation capabilities that can be freely integrated with virtually any repository.

Practical implications

The open nature of the software suite enables stewardship organizations to integrate the components with their own preservation environments and to contribute to the ongoing improvement of the systems.

Originality/value

The paper reports on innovative research and development to provide preservation capabilities. The results enable proactive, continuous preservation management through a context-aware planning and monitoring cycle integrated with operational systems.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Vasily Bunakov, Catherine Jones, Brian Matthews and Michael Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to suggest an approach to data value considerations that is related to the generalized notion of authenticity and can be applied to the design…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest an approach to data value considerations that is related to the generalized notion of authenticity and can be applied to the design of preservation policies. There has been considerable progress in the scalable architectures for policy-driven digital collection preservation as well as in modeling preservation costs. However, modeling the value of both digital artifacts and collections seems a more elusive topic that has yet to find a proper methodology and means of expression.

Design/methodology/approach

A top-down conceptual analysis was developed and the principles of information technology service management and quality management were applied to the domain of digital preservation. Then, in a bottom-up analysis, the various notions of authenticity in digital preservation projects, reference models and conceptual papers were reviewed.

Findings

The top-down and bottom-up analyses have a meeting point, establishing a close relation between the concepts of data authenticity and data value.

Originality/value

The generalized understanding of authenticity can support the design of sensible preservation policies and their application to the formation and long-term maintenance of digital collections.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Kirsty Fenn and Adrienne Muir

Presents case studies of preservation management policies and practice in six independent libraries. The nature of the library buildings, collections, finance and…

Abstract

Presents case studies of preservation management policies and practice in six independent libraries. The nature of the library buildings, collections, finance and management, preservation policies and practice were investigated. The libraries face similar preservation problems and constraints as other libraries, including a lack of awareness, lack of space, unfavourable environmental conditions and a lack of resources. However, the central role of members, and the fact that many independent libraries are housed in listed buildings, pose additional constraints that make current preservation standards difficult to achieve. User education is essential to understanding the need for preservation activities and to overcome resistance to activities that affect member privileges. Communication and co‐operation between independent libraries is also recommended. Independent Libraries have to engage more with the outside world to gain access to sources of funding and assistance.

Details

Library Management, vol. 24 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Paul Eden and John Feather

Introduces a one‐year research project, based on a questionnaire survey of nearly 300 archives and record offices, and interviews with librarians, archivists and…

Abstract

Introduces a one‐year research project, based on a questionnaire survey of nearly 300 archives and record offices, and interviews with librarians, archivists and conservationists. Posits that the research will gather and analyse information on written preservation policies and strategies; reprography policies; environmental control; housekeeping routines; staff training; user education; security; disaster management; and statistics for preservation planning. Initial findings highlight concern regarding the increasing emphasis on user services and damage caused by photocopying; the problem of disintegrating collections printed or written on poor quality paper; the central role of microform as a surrogate medium; interest in the feasibility of establishing a central repository for microfilm; and interest in the surrogacy potential of digitization. Expects that the research will produce good practice guidelines for libraries, archives and record offices and will result in detailed recommendations as to what a national preservation policy might contain and the issues it should consider, thus pointing the way towards a national preservation policy and significantly strengthening the case for it.

Details

Library Review, vol. 45 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Ebele N. Anyaoku, Anthonia U. Nwabueze Echedom and Ebikabowei Emmanuel Baro

The purpose of the study is to investigate the digital preservation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the digital preservation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the IRs developed in university libraries in Africa, and it was done in two phases. The phases are website investigation to identify the university libraries in Africa that have developed IR and online questionnaire.

Findings

Results from the study showed that the majority of IRs in Africa used DSpace software to manage their digital contents, and more than half of the IRs engage in information migration. The study also revealed that the majority of the responding institutions provide long-term digital preservation in their IR. Interestingly, the majority of the IRs has developed digital preservation policy to guide the implementation of digital preservation for IR contents. Finally, the majority of the respondents indicated that they do not have long-term funding and lack the necessary technical staff with required skills to handle and manage the IR.

Research limitations/implications

Because of language barriers, data were collected from only universities in English speaking countries in Africa.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will make librarians in universities in Africa and other developing countries understand the key issues relating to digital preservation and longevity.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will inform information professionals, librarians in developing countries that are planning to create IRs and provide long-term digital preservation of electronic resources in their institution.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Maria Luisa Calanag, Koichi Tabata and Shigeo Sugimoto

The long‐term preservation of digital resources is one of the most important issues facing the library community. In particular, libraries need a preservation strategy for…

Abstract

The long‐term preservation of digital resources is one of the most important issues facing the library community. In particular, libraries need a preservation strategy for digital objects, since digitization alone provides access but not preservation. The digital library community is also focusing on the problem of designing and implementing long‐term archives or repositories. Digital repository management includes the development and enforcement of policies for tasks such as managing access to collection contents and preserving items in the collection. Comprehensive standards and best practices are currently starting to emerge, and ongoing work has deepened the understanding of the needs and requirements that must be met to carry out effective digital preservation. One of these requirements is the creation and maintenance of metadata in support of the preservation process. This paper would like to share findings from earlier and ongoing work that serve as “groundwork” for the current directions leading to the idea of making metadata a more useful and powerful tool to contribute to the technical solution of digital preservation.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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