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Article

Christoph Becker, Luis Faria and Kresimir Duretec

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of…

Abstract

Purpose

Preservation environments such as repositories need scalable and context-aware preservation planning and monitoring capabilities to ensure continued accessibility of content over time. This article identifies a number of gaps in the systems and mechanisms currently available and presents a new, innovative architecture for scalable decision-making and control in such environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates the state of the art in preservation planning and monitoring, highlights the key challenges faced by repositories to provide scalable decision-making and monitoring facilities, and presents the contributions of the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite to provide such capabilities.

Findings

The presented architecture makes preservation planning and monitoring context-aware through a semantic representation of key organizational factors, and integrates this with a business intelligence system that collects and reasons upon preservation-relevant information.

Research limitations/implications

The architecture has been implemented in the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite. Integration with repositories and external information sources provide powerful preservation capabilities that can be freely integrated with virtually any repository.

Practical implications

The open nature of the software suite enables stewardship organizations to integrate the components with their own preservation environments and to contribute to the ongoing improvement of the systems.

Originality/value

The paper reports on innovative research and development to provide preservation capabilities. The results enable proactive, continuous preservation management through a context-aware planning and monitoring cycle integrated with operational systems.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article

Christoph Becker, Luis Faria and Kresimir Duretec

This article aims to evaluate a new architecture for scalable decision-making and control in preservation environments for its ability to address five key goals: scalable…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to evaluate a new architecture for scalable decision-making and control in preservation environments for its ability to address five key goals: scalable content profiling; monitoring of compliance, risks and opportunities; efficient creation of trustworthy plans; context awareness; and loosely coupled preservation ecosystems. Scalable decision support and business intelligence capabilities are required to effectively secure content over time.

Design/methodology/approach

We conduct a systematic evaluation of the contributions of the SCAPE Planning and Watch suite to provide effective and scalable decision support capabilities. We discuss the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of advancing the state of art and report on a case study with a national library.

Findings

The system provides substantial capabilities for semi-automated, scalable decision-making and control of preservation functions in repositories. Well-defined interfaces allow a flexible integration with diverse institutional environments. The free and open nature of the tool suite further encourages global take-up in the repository communities.

Research limitations/implications

The article discusses a number of bottlenecks and factors limiting the real-world scalability of preservation environments. This includes data-intensive processing of large volumes of information, automated quality assurance for preservation actions, and the element of human decision-making. We outline open issues and future work.

Practical implications

The open nature of the software suite enables stewardship organizations to integrate the components with their own preservation environments and to contribute to the ongoing improvement of the systems.

Originality/value

The paper reports on innovative research and development to provide preservation capabilities. The results of the assessment demonstrate how the system advances the control of digital preservation operations from ad hoc decision-making to proactive, continuous preservation management, through a context-aware planning and monitoring cycle integrated with operational systems.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Library Technical Services: Operations and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-795-0

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Article

Rebecca Leshinsky

Sustainable values and implementation tools are now more widely included in Australian land use planning and development. Planning agreements are one instrument by which…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable values and implementation tools are now more widely included in Australian land use planning and development. Planning agreements are one instrument by which environmental values and preservation can be made more enduring, particularly as planning agreements run with the land. Little has been said about these agreements and the purpose of this paper is to strive to add to the body of knowledge in this area. The aim of this paper is to introduce a contextual framework for planning agreements, drawing on collaborative planning theory and practice. It also demonstrates how planning agreements can been used as a tool to preserve environmental values and principles generally, and more particularly the rich flora and fauna in the surrounding housing estate adjacent to the Royal Botanical Gardens in Cranbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on a case study from the municipality of Casey located in the state of Victoria and introduces measures taken, via planning agreements between the municipality and estate developers, to preserve green values and the flora and fauna located in the surrounds of the Royal Botanical Gardens in Cranbourne.

Findings

The case study suggests that, whilst the planning agreements may have established excellent procedure and practice to preserve the flora and fauna at the botanic gardens and in its surrounds, the effectiveness of the planning agreements as an environmental preservation tool has limitations. This may be due to the lack of resources for more effective information dissemination and enforcement. Ultimately, it may have to be left to the goodwill of residents to ensure environmental protection of the botanic gardens and its surrounds is maintained.

Research limitations/implications

As the housing estate is still a young development, the case study is an exploratory approach. This leaves open the opportunity for further data to be gathered from estate residents into the effectiveness of the preservation and enforcement of the green values and principles raised in the planning agreements. There is also the opportunity to take the study further to ascertain longitudinally, how respectful original and subsequent owners are of the green values planted in the planning agreements.

Originality/value

The analysis of the case study is instructive, particularly as there is a dearth of literature on how effective planning law agreements are as an environmental preservation and sustainability tool.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

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Article

Beth Oehlerts and Shu Liu

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of digital archiving and preservation practices and processes successfully implemented at an academic institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of digital archiving and preservation practices and processes successfully implemented at an academic institution.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study chronicles the planning and actions taken to identify, select, package, and archive local digital assets for long‐term access and migration. It includes a literature review and offers selected resources as a starting point for other institutions investigating digital preservation tools and practices.

Findings

Digital preservation is a broad, evolving, and important facet of digital asset management, yet often overlooked by library administration and understated in library operations. Collaborative approaches should be considered in implementing digital preservation tools and processes with limited resources.

Practical implications

What is successfully in operation at CSUL may be learned by other institutions. An effective preservation plan and established workflows will give an organization the capability to maximize limited funds and staff time.

Originality/value

The majority of the current literature provides theories, technologies, conceptual models, and large‐scale collaborations, with relatively little describing needs, practices, operations, and experiences at a specific academic library. This paper will contribute to the literature by discussing digital preservation from actual experience, based on the work we perform, the needs we face, and the solutions we reach within our current environment.

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Article

Samuel Demas

A systematic, disciplinary approach to setting preservation priorities developed at Mann Library is described. The Core Agricultural Literature project, under the…

Abstract

A systematic, disciplinary approach to setting preservation priorities developed at Mann Library is described. The Core Agricultural Literature project, under the direction of Wallace C. Olsen, has identified the core historical literature in seven disciplines comprising the agricultural sciences. Specific applications and adaptations of the core literature methodology in three other biology and agriculture preservation projects are discussed. Two of the four preservation projects briefly described here have been undertaken as part of a national preservation plan for agricultural sciences literature. The application of digital technology in a national cooperative effort to preserve core historical literature of agriculture represents the culmination of Mann Library's work in developing a disciplinary approach to national preservation planning.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Paul Eden, Nancy Bell, Naomi Dungworth and Graham Matthews

Reports a British Library Research and Innovation Centre funded research project which aims to develop a method for assessing preservation needs in UK libraries and…

Abstract

Reports a British Library Research and Innovation Centre funded research project which aims to develop a method for assessing preservation needs in UK libraries and archives, and to develop the method in such a way as to facilitate an assessment of national preservation needs and priorities. Discusses what is meant by a preservation needs assessment, provides an overview of recent and ongoing preservation surveys and presents preliminary findings relating to key practical issues. Highlights the primary importance of good preparation and planning, the need to concentrate on “asking the right questions” to meet stated aims and objectives and the need to ensure that the assessment is not planned and carried out in isolation. The development of a national preservation needs assessment ‐ fundamental to the development of a UK national preservation strategy ‐ is considered in the light of these findings.

Details

Library Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Maja Krtalić and Damir Hasenay

This paper aims to explore a theoretical and methodological approach to preservation management in libraries, relying on the basic presumption that preservation is a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore a theoretical and methodological approach to preservation management in libraries, relying on the basic presumption that preservation is a complex and comprehensive process that involves many different and seemingly diverse aspects whose efficiency lies in preservation management.

Design/methodology approach

Using a case study of Croatia, the paper describes a methodology for exploring the general preservation management context and presents a preservation management model that comprises five key components.

Findings

The paper offers insight into preservation management issues in a specific national context.

Research limitations/implications

Although this paper focuses primarily on written heritage in libraries, it is applicable to other types of heritage and to other types of information institutions.

Practical implications

The theoretical and methodological approach presented in this paper and described in the example of Croatia can be useful for exploring similar issues in other countries. It can be expanded to other types and forms of heritage and heritage institutions.

Originality/value

The paper describes a model of organising preservation activities into an efficient and successful preservation system, and establishes a methodology for exploring diverse preservation issues on national and institutional levels.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part

Whitney Pape and Eric C. Shoaf

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many…

Abstract

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many different departments. Not until the 1970s did library organizations begin to add preservation to organizational charts on a departmental or middle management level, along with its new administrative costs. At that time, libraries were struggling with early efforts at automation and the many changes it would bring to their organizations. Preservation department functions, formerly decentralized from an administrative and budgetary standpoint under the headings of commercial binding, book repair, special collections, or circulation, were now identified as a budget line forced to compete for funds with newly formed library systems departments as well as other traditional library functions. This was particularly difficult given that a large portion of the costs of a comprehensive preservation department were new and additive (Fasana and Baker, 1992, p. 132), yet provided few immediately evident benefits. A burgeoning library systems unit could place libraries on the cutting edge of technology; automated card catalogs could improve productivity and efficiency for staff, and also provide for better patron access to collections. Needless to say, systems departments were much better funded than preservation units at this time.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Article

Ebele N. Anyaoku, Anthonia U. Nwabueze Echedom and Ebikabowei Emmanuel Baro

The purpose of the study is to investigate the digital preservation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the digital preservation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the IRs developed in university libraries in Africa, and it was done in two phases. The phases are website investigation to identify the university libraries in Africa that have developed IR and online questionnaire.

Findings

Results from the study showed that the majority of IRs in Africa used DSpace software to manage their digital contents, and more than half of the IRs engage in information migration. The study also revealed that the majority of the responding institutions provide long-term digital preservation in their IR. Interestingly, the majority of the IRs has developed digital preservation policy to guide the implementation of digital preservation for IR contents. Finally, the majority of the respondents indicated that they do not have long-term funding and lack the necessary technical staff with required skills to handle and manage the IR.

Research limitations/implications

Because of language barriers, data were collected from only universities in English speaking countries in Africa.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will make librarians in universities in Africa and other developing countries understand the key issues relating to digital preservation and longevity.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will inform information professionals, librarians in developing countries that are planning to create IRs and provide long-term digital preservation of electronic resources in their institution.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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