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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Danielle Bessett

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two…

Abstract

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two generations. Based on longitudinal, in-depth interviews with a diverse group of 64 pregnant women and 23 grandmothers-to-be, this chapter explores how different generations of women negotiate the idea of a disconnect and its implications for the medicalization of pregnancy. My findings showed limited support for the generational disconnect. Nearly all of the pregnant women I interviewed who were in contact with their mothers consulted them to assess issues related to pregnancy embodiment. Black and Latina women and white women with less than a college degree disregarded or even rejected the disconnect; they tended to frame their mothers’ advice as relevant. Their mothers attended prenatal care appointments and frequently expressed skepticism about medical directives. By contrast, I found that highly educated white women tended to endorse the generational disconnect when it came to matters related to pregnancy health behaviors – what to eat, how much to exercise – and their obstetric care. The mothers of these women not only largely supported the generational disconnect, but also bonded with their daughter over a shared appreciation for scientific understandings of pregnancy. Foregrounding women’s perspectives provides insights into meaning-making in pregnancy and the ways that mothers of pregnant women can both stymie and deepen medicalization of childbearing.

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Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Katarzyna Ługowska and Wojciech Kolanowski

The purpose of this study was to assess the nutritional behavior regarding the frequency of consumption of the main types of food by pregnant women attending antenatal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess the nutritional behavior regarding the frequency of consumption of the main types of food by pregnant women attending antenatal classes in comparison to non-attendees.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted in Poland among 200 women in the first pregnancy, 100 of whom were attending antenatal classes and 100 were non-attendees.

Findings

Women attending antenatal classes exhibited more favorable health-related nutritional behaviors in comparison with those not attending. Attendees eat more vegetables and milk products whereas non-attendees declared more processed meat and sweets consumption. Three-fourth of non-attendees and two-fourth of attendees considered their diet as good. It was also found that the level of physical activity of pregnant women attending antenatal classes was significantly higher than among those who did not attend such classes.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study was that it took place in Poland and voices from women of other European countries as well as diverse ethnicities were not represented. In addition, women were interviewed only during their pregnancy, and therefore it was not possible to investigate women's nutritional behaviors after delivery.

Practical implications

This research shows clearly that attending antenatal classes may involve with a beneficial effect on the nutritional behavior of pregnant women. It is expected that once established healthy nutritional habits should be practiced further.

Originality/value

This research is the indication of the important role of antenatal classes in developing more favorable health-related dietary behavior expressed by the participants. To our knowledge in Poland, it is the first time that the nutritional behavior of pregnant women attending and not attending antenatal classes were examined and compared. So far in Poland, the extent and type of nutritional education received by pregnant women across antenatal care has not been examined. This research can contribute to a broader recognition of nutritional knowledge and practice of pregnant women important for the health of mother and her baby.

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British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

David J. Hutson

In the contemporary US, pregnant women must navigate competing ideas about their bodies, including expectations for weight gain. Given that there are few social spaces…

Abstract

In the contemporary US, pregnant women must navigate competing ideas about their bodies, including expectations for weight gain. Given that there are few social spaces where women may gain weight without disapproval, pregnancy represents a period when women are allowed to put on weight. However, gaining weight means doing so within the context of the obesity “epidemic” and increased medical surveillance of the body. To explore how women navigate the medicalization of pregnancy weight, I draw on data from in-depth interviews with 40 pregnant and recently pregnant women. Findings indicate that women reframe the meaning of pregnancy weight as “baby weight,” rather than body weight. This allows them to view it as a temporary condition that is “for the baby,” while holding two concurrent body images – a pregnant and a non-pregnant version of themselves. Women also resist the quantification of their maternity weight, either by not keeping track or not looking at scales in the doctor’s office. Doing so prevented baby weight from turning back into body weight – a concrete and meaningful number on the scale. Such resistance to quantification is often accomplished with the help of doctors and healthcare professionals who do not explicitly discuss weight gain with their patients. These findings suggest that women rely on a variety of strategies to navigate the medicalization of pregnancy weight, and provides another lens through which to understand how and why women may make similar choices about other medicalized aspects of their pregnancy (or pregnancy experiences).

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Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Kaylee J. Hackney and Pamela L. Perrewé

Research examining the experiences of women in the workplace has, to a large extent, neglected the unique stressors pregnant employees may experience. Stress during…

Abstract

Research examining the experiences of women in the workplace has, to a large extent, neglected the unique stressors pregnant employees may experience. Stress during pregnancy has been shown consistently to lead to detrimental consequences for the mother and her baby. Using job stress theories, we develop an expanded theoretical model of experienced stress during pregnancy and the potential detrimental health outcomes for the mother and her baby. Our theoretical model includes factors from multiple levels (i.e., individual, interpersonal, sociocultural, and community) and the role they play on the health and well-being of the pregnant employee and her baby. In order to gain a deeper understanding of job stress during pregnancy, we examine three pregnancy-specific organizational stressors (i.e., perceived pregnancy discrimination, pregnancy disclosure, and identity-role conflict) that are unique to pregnant employees. These stressors are argued to be over and above the normal job stressors experienced and they are proposed to result in elevated levels of experienced stress leading to detrimental health outcomes for the mother and baby. The role of resilience resources and learning in reducing some of the negative outcomes from job stressors is also explored.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2016

Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel, Antonio Sifuentes-Alvarez and Carlos Salas-Martinez

We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in…

Abstract

We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4th Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

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Mental Illness, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Beth Sundstrom

Theories of prosumption offer social marketers an opportunity to improve market segmentation strategies and health campaigns by improving understanding of audiences. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Theories of prosumption offer social marketers an opportunity to improve market segmentation strategies and health campaigns by improving understanding of audiences. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to understand how women produce and consume ideologies of pregnancy.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 19 pregnant women ages 24‐38 years completed qualitative, in‐depth interviews. Data analysis included a grounded theory approach and constant‐comparative method using open and axial coding to reduce the data and identify themes across the data.

Findings

This study addressed prosumption in three meaning‐making sites: the physiological basis of pregnancy; perceptions of medicine and the biomedical model during pregnancy; and perceptions of media surrounding pregnancy.

Research limitations/implications

This study applied prosumption theory in a new social context: pregnant women. Findings articulate the importance of gender and the necessity of incorporating women's lived experiences into theories of prosumption.

Practical implications

Social marketers benefit from improved understandings of pregnant women's body identity, perceptions, and opportunities for empowerment and agency in reproductive health. The proposed “purist pregnant woman” myth impacts effective strategies in social marketing and health communication campaigns. Findings suggest that pregnant women may serve as a receptive audience for a range of health issues.

Social implications

This study extends our understanding of prosumers, suggesting that prosumption of pregnancy reduces alienation, humanizes and demedicalizes health care and the birthing process.

Originality/value

This study offers theoretical and practical implications for social marketing and health communication campaigns to improve pregnancy health outcomes through an improved understanding of prosumers.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Criminal Justice Responses to Maternal Filicide: Judging the failed mother
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-621-1

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2012

Deborah A. Potter

Purpose – Using Foucault's concepts of biopolitics and governmentality along with sociological constructions of risk, this chapter asks, “What definitions and procedures…

Abstract

Purpose – Using Foucault's concepts of biopolitics and governmentality along with sociological constructions of risk, this chapter asks, “What definitions and procedures have states used in their legislation about FAS to justify state intervention? What are the social and policy implications?”

Methodology/approach – Qualitative content analysis of state legislation enacted into law.

Findings – Against a backdrop of child abuse which justifies intervention, states use different techniques of biopolitics to secure governance over pregnant women and their developing fetuses, including (a) a social history of prenatal alcohol consumption; (b) a diagnosis of FAS in the child; and/or (c) a visible or measurable physiological characteristic of the newborn/child associated with FAS.

Social implications – This chapter extends the analysis of alcohol consumption by pregnant women to a policy level and examines central questions about the government's role in the biopolitical framing of prenatal alcohol use and the differential assignment of risk and responsibility.

Originality/value of chapter – This chapter contributes to work on maternal–fetal conflict, risk, and governmentality in women's reproductive health.

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Critical Perspectives on Addiction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-930-1

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2018

Faruk Anıl Konuk

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of health consciousness, environmental concern and customer innovativeness on pregnant women’s purchase intentions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of health consciousness, environmental concern and customer innovativeness on pregnant women’s purchase intentions and willingness to pay (WTP) a premium for organic food.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to collect data, a field study was conducted using administrated questionnaires from a convenience sample of pregnant women in Istanbul, Turkey. A structural equations model was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicated positive effects of health consciousness, environmental concern and customer innovativeness on both purchase intentions and WTP a premium toward organic food. Specifically, it was found that health consciousness had the greatest influence on purchase intentions and WTP a premium.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, this research focused on pregnant women and aimed to understand the role of health consciousness, environmental concerned and customer innovativeness on purchase intentions and WTP a premium for organic food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Lydia Boampong Owusu, Charles Apprey, Abigail Kusi-Amponsah Diji and Atinuke Adebanji

The purpose of the study was to assess the association between iron intake and anaemia during pregnancy as well as estimate the prevalence and magnitude of anaemia in pregnancy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to assess the association between iron intake and anaemia during pregnancy as well as estimate the prevalence and magnitude of anaemia in pregnancy.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective case-control study was conducted on 383 postnatal women at four health-care facilities. Data on iron supplementation and haemoglobin (Hb) levels during pregnancy was collected from the respondents. Spearman, Pearson Chi-square tests of independence were used to measure associations between variables, whereas a log-linear model was adopted to ascertain the level of interaction among variables. All p-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Findings

Results show 54.3% prevalence of anaemia at registration and 33.6% at 36 weeks of pregnancy, p < 0.001. Iron supplement intake during pregnancy was 96.3%. The log-linear analysis model retained the Parity × Marital Status interaction across the levels of anaemia (p < 0.001). Relative to married pregnant women, single pregnant women were 6.38% more likely to be anaemic (OR = 1.06).

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of retrospective studies is recall bias; however, this was likely to be minimal, as participants were approached within 8 days after delivery. Despite this, this study still holds promise as it reports a rather high prevalence of anaemia at 36 weeks even with the high intake of iron.

Originality/value

Anaemia in pregnancy is a major public health issue because of the consequential outcomes on maternal and child health. The study identified a high prevalence of anaemia at registration; which could be the basis for intensifying pre-natal iron supplementation before pregnancy.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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