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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

S. Mostafa Rasoolimanesh, Christian M. Ringle, Marko Sarstedt and Hossein Olya

This study aims to propose guidelines for the joint use of partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose guidelines for the joint use of partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to combine symmetric and asymmetric perspectives in model evaluation, in the hospitality and tourism field.

Design/methodology/approach

This study discusses PLS-SEM as a symmetric approach and fsQCA as an asymmetric approach to analyze structural and configurational models. It presents guidelines to conduct an fsQCA based on latent construct scores drawn from PLS-SEM, to assess how configurations of exogenous constructs produce a specific outcome in an endogenous construct.

Findings

This research highlights the advantages of combining PLS-SEM and fsQCA to analyze the causal effects of antecedents (i.e., exogenous constructs) on outcomes (i.e., endogenous constructs). The construct scores extracted from the PLS-SEM analysis of a nomological network of constructs provide accurate input for performing fsQCA to identify the sufficient configurations required to predict the outcome(s). Complementing the assessment of the model’s explanatory and predictive power, the fsQCA generates more fine-grained insights into variable relationships, thereby offering the means to reach better managerial conclusions.

Originality/value

The application of PLS-SEM and fsQCA as separate prediction-oriented methods has increased notably in recent years. However, in the absence of clear guidelines, studies applied the methods inconsistently, giving researchers little direction on how to best apply PLS-SEM and fsQCA in tandem. To address this concern, this study provides guidelines for the joint use of PLS-SEM and fsQCA.

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Saalem Sadeque, Mohammad Shahidul Hasan Swapan, Sanjit K. Roy and MD Ashikuzzaman

This study aims to investigate how city dependence and city social bonding determine city brand love. In addition, the study examines whether there are different resident…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how city dependence and city social bonding determine city brand love. In addition, the study examines whether there are different resident segments that exhibit distinct behaviour in relation to city brand formation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on primary responses collected from 595 residents from Khulna city in Bangladesh. The research model is tested using partial least square (PLS) structural equation modelling. The resident segments were identified using PLS prediction-oriented segmentation method.

Findings

Results show that city dependence (i.e. dependence on urban facilities and services provided by the city) and city social bonding (i.e. social interactions amongst residents in the city) lead to city brand love through city satisfaction and city identification. In addition, the study finds that city social bonding and city satisfaction are important for the relationship-reliant residents, whereas city dependence and city identification are important for the resource-reliant residents.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can investigate the relationship between the length of residence and native vs non-native residents’ influence on city brand love formation.

Practical implications

The city brand managers and planners should adopt a resident-inclusive approach that considers the different needs of the residents to engender city brand love.

Originality/value

The study contributes to city branding literature by empirically investigating the under-researched topic of city brand love by identifying the key constructs and their role in determining city brand love. Further, it shows that the route to city brand love formation is different based on residents’ needs.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Kanak Patel and Ricardo Pereira

This chapter analyses the ability of some structural models to predict corporate bankruptcy. The study extends the existing empirical work on default risk in two ways…

Abstract

This chapter analyses the ability of some structural models to predict corporate bankruptcy. The study extends the existing empirical work on default risk in two ways. First, it estimates the expected default probabilities (EDPs) for a sample of bankrupt companies in the USA as a function of volatility, debt ratio, and other company variables. Second, it computes default correlations using a copula function and extracts common or latent factors that drive companies’ default correlations using a factor-analytical technique. Idiosyncratic risk is observed to change significantly prior to bankruptcy and its impact on EDPs is found to be more important than that of total volatility. Information-related tests corroborate the results of prediction-orientated tests reported by other studies in the literature; however, only a weak explanatory power is found in the widely used market-to-book assets and book-to-market equity ratio. The results indicate that common factors, which capture the overall state of the economy, explain default correlations quite well.

Details

Econometrics and Risk Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-196-1

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Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Jörg Henseler, Christian M. Ringle and Rudolf R. Sinkovics

In order to determine the status quo of PLS path modeling in international marketing research, we conducted an exhaustive literature review. An evaluation of double-blind…

Abstract

In order to determine the status quo of PLS path modeling in international marketing research, we conducted an exhaustive literature review. An evaluation of double-blind reviewed journals through important academic publishing databases (e.g., ABI/Inform, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Emerald Insight, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, Swetswise) revealed that more than 30 academic articles in the domain of international marketing (in a broad sense) used PLS path modeling as means of statistical analysis. We assessed what the main motivation for the use of PLS was in respect of each article. Moreover, we checked for applications of PLS in combination with one or more additional methods, and whether the main reason for conducting any additional method(s) was mentioned.

Details

New Challenges to International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-469-6

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Edward E. Rigdon, Christian M. Ringle and Marko Sarstedt

Alongside structural equation modeling (SEM), the complementary technique of partial least squares (PLS) path modeling helps researchers understand relations among sets of…

Abstract

Alongside structural equation modeling (SEM), the complementary technique of partial least squares (PLS) path modeling helps researchers understand relations among sets of observed variables. Like SEM, PLS began with an assumption of homogeneity – one population and one model – but has developed techniques for modeling data from heterogeneous populations, consistent with a marketing emphasis on segmentation. Heterogeneity can be expressed through interactions and nonlinear terms. Additionally, researchers can use multiple group analysis and latent class methods. This chapter reviews these techniques for modeling heterogeneous data in PLS, and illustrates key developments in finite mixture modeling in PLS using the SmartPLS 2.0 package.

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-475-8

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Teresa M. McCarthy‐Byrne and John T. Mentzer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural and process integration mechanisms used by firms to form a hybrid mode of supply chain governance referred to as…

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2936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural and process integration mechanisms used by firms to form a hybrid mode of supply chain governance referred to as supply chain value integration (SCVI).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a multi‐method approach, conducting depth interviews following the grand touring technique to develop the model, and survey methodology to test the model using partial least squares approach for structural path estimation.

Findings

SCVI is a multi‐dimensional concept comprised of two second‐order constructs, SCVI infrastructure and SCVI process, each comprised of three first‐order constructs, that lead to joint value creation and improved supply chain performance.

Practical implications

Dependent suppliers striving to compete on value creation can adopt bonding behavior by establishing an integrative infrastructure comprised of people, technology, and knowledge components, which balances the level of dependence and motivates the customer to engage in integrative processes.

Originality/value

The authors expand on previous models of integration by developing and testing a comprehensive multi‐dimensional theory of SCVI that explains the relationships between resource dependency theory, resource‐based view of the firm, and relational exchange theory.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Hanna Salminen, Mika Vanhala and Pia Heilmann

The purpose of this paper is to the debate on employees’ subjective performance evaluations by examining how organisational commitment and job satisfaction are related to…

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1270

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to the debate on employees’ subjective performance evaluations by examining how organisational commitment and job satisfaction are related to perceived performance at the individual, unit and organisation levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative survey data were collected from two large corporations in Finland: one operating in the field of information and communications technology and the other in the forestry industry. The partial least squares (PLS) method was used for the data analyses.

Findings

Both job satisfaction and organisational commitment had a positive effect on employees’ perceived individual-, unit- and organisation-level performance. These effects were the strongest at the organisation level.

Originality/value

To date, limited attention has been paid to perceived individual-, unit- and organisation-level performance as a consequence of organisational commitment and job satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Firdaus Basbeth, Roselina Ahmad Saufi and Khaeruddin Bin Sudharmin

Assessing the impact of hygiene factors on faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching will advance the literature. It will especially demystify that both…

Abstract

Purpose

Assessing the impact of hygiene factors on faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching will advance the literature. It will especially demystify that both factors (hygiene factors and motivator) can cause job satisfaction in online education. The purpose of this paper is to firstly determine the level of faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching. Secondly, this study analyses the extent to which hygiene factors affect motivation and faculty satisfaction with online teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of this study consists of university faculty in Indonesia and Malaysia. The sample is randomly chosen in 50 higher education institutions in Indonesia and Malaysia. The sample size is 206. The participants completed a survey, including perceived student engagement, institutional support, motivation, faculty satisfaction and demographical questions. To test the model, PLS-SEM was used using SmartPLS3 software. The hygiene factors construct was operationalized as a second-order construct consisting of first-order construct: student engagement and institutional support.

Findings

There were no statistically significant differences concerning institutional support and motivation by country of residence. However, there were significant differences in student engagement and faculty satisfaction by country residence. Concerning satisfaction and motivation, the most satisfied and motivated was the faculty member in Indonesia. Hygiene factors were found as the antecedent to faculty motivation and faculty motivation multiplying hygiene factors' effect on job satisfaction. The results showed that student engagement has the highest impact on faculty satisfaction, followed by motivation. Work motivation mediates the relationship between hygiene factors and faculty satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study has limitations; firstly, causal inferences are not warranted as the data is cross-sectional. However, a future direction is to analyse the causal relationship between the hygiene factors, and motivation factors on faculty satisfaction using a formative first-order construct through a longitudinal study. Secondly, the results’ generalizability is another limitation of this study because the sample comprised only Indonesia and Malaysia faculty across 51 higher education institution in big cities in the island of Java in Indonesia and Malaysia peninsular only; however, the factors determined in this study represent the job-related aspects taken from the literature and the researchers’ experiences; other parts influence faculty satisfaction with online teaching. Therefore, identifying other elements is a future path.

Practical implications

When managers aim at increasing faculty satisfaction, the priority should be given to improve the performance of indicators with the highest effect but a relatively low in performance. All of this implies that higher education institution first needs to find ways to increase motivation by rewarding faculty in many forms, and improve the quality of instruction. Secondly, implementing policies and make some decisions that require an investment such as providing a learning management system.

Social implications

Indonesia and Malaysia higher education institutions may ameliorate faculty satisfaction with online teaching in several ways. Firstly, before the online course begins, higher education institutions should attempt to have faculty believe teaching online is worthwhile and understand the institution itself also believes it is significant. Administer training for faculty, especially regarding increasing connections with and between students, gives faculty the time needed to design an online course and provide faculty with a course management system with multiple capabilities. Secondly, during the online course, higher education institutions should support technical issues and try to have faculty believe they have an accommodating work schedule and independence with the online course.

Originality/value

This research firstly contributes to the literature by establishing the relationship between hygiene factors and motivation, and hygiene factors and satisfaction, which did not exist according to the two-factor theory in the past. Secondly, the authors provide evidence of motivation constructs as a mediating variable. Thirdly, this study broadens the literature scope by including faculty in two countries (Indonesia and Malaysia). It includes faculty from 51 higher education systems (e.g. public and private four-year universities), incudes graduate school in seven big cities in two countries, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Maha Mohammed Yusr, Sany Sanuri Mohd Mokhtar, Abdul Rahim Othman and Yaty Sulaiman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of applying total quality management (TQM) on enhancing knowledge management processes. It also examine the…

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1343

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of applying total quality management (TQM) on enhancing knowledge management processes. It also examine the relationship between knowledge management and innovation performance in the Malaysian manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey method to test the formulated hypotheses. Therefore, the adopted questionnaire was used as an instrument to collect the needed data. The population of the study consisted of 800 big and medium manufacturing companies listed in Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers (2012).

Findings

The results of this paper support a positive and significant impact of TQM practice on knowledge management processes. Furthermore, the relationship between knowledge management and innovation performance has been a proved. However, further analysis on dimension level indicates that knowledge acquisition failed to show significant relationship with innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study addresses one of the recent issues within the Malaysian context of becoming a developed nation, which is innovation performance, specifically for manufacturing companies. To do so, the overlapping relationships among TQM practices, knowledge management, and innovation performance have been tested.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Abdullahi Hassan Gorondutse, Gamal Abdualmajed Ali and Haim Hilman

Total quality management (TQM) must include orientation towards quality awareness in the overall organisational processes in a firm. A successful TQM needs a supportive…

Abstract

Purpose

Total quality management (TQM) must include orientation towards quality awareness in the overall organisational processes in a firm. A successful TQM needs a supportive culture that can adapt to alterations and strengthen innovation. This study aims to confirm the association between the style of management known as organisational culture (OC) and TQM practices in manufacturing Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data-driven research was drawn from self-assessment inquiries among 772 managers/owners of manufacturing SMEs of the Saudi Arabia Kingdom (KSA). The dominant culture was detected by means of a cross-sectional technique.

Findings

The findings enrich the literature by revealing a positive effect of OC on TQM execution in the manufacturing SMEs of KSA.

Research limitations/implications

Prior to the execution of TQM operations, administrators of manufacturing SMEs should be aware of the culture within organisations so that TQM may be implemented.

Practical implications

The study suggests that organisations, particularly manufacturing SMEs, should constantly strive to enhance the TQM culture.

Social implications

Amid intense competition among manufacturing SMEs, it is crucial to guarantee their high performance. This research assists society in evaluating the strength of a particular SME sector and further enables it to assess which SMEs really have a good OC–TQM relation.

Originality/value

The paper creates and presents various platforms of the OC and TQM as a unified body of knowledge.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

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