Search results

1 – 10 of over 37000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2003

M.A.L.M van Assen

In this study negotiated exchange under the 1-exchange rule is considered in the whole population of 142,660 exchange networks up to size 9. A review shows that 51 of…

Abstract

In this study negotiated exchange under the 1-exchange rule is considered in the whole population of 142,660 exchange networks up to size 9. A review shows that 51 of these networks have been studied in the literature. Predictions for the whole population of networks are derived by parsimonious versions of power-dependence and exchange-resistance theory. All but 301 networks are classified similarly as equal, weak, or strong power networks by the power-dependence and exchange-resistance theory. Only 4% of the networks is classified as a strong power network, as opposed to the 43% of the networks studied in the literature.

Details

Power and Status
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-030-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Herman Aksom and Inna Tymchenko

This essay raises a concern about the trajectory that new institutionalism has been following during the last decades, namely an emphasis on heterogeneity, change and…

Downloads
1280

Abstract

Purpose

This essay raises a concern about the trajectory that new institutionalism has been following during the last decades, namely an emphasis on heterogeneity, change and agentic behavior instead of isomorphism and conformist behavior. This is a crucial issue from the perspective of the philosophy and methodology of science since a theory that admits both change and stability as a norm has less scientific weight then a theory that predicts a prevalence of passivity and isomorphism over change and strategic behavior. The former provides explanations and predictions while the latter does not.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers an analysis of the nature, characteristics, functions and boundaries of institutional theories in the spirit of philosophy and methodology of science literature.

Findings

The power of the former institutional theory developed by Meyer, Rowan, DiMaggio and Powell lies in its generalization, explanation and prediction of observable and unobservable phenomena: as a typical organizational theory that puts forward directional predictions, it explains and predicts the tendency for organizations to become more similar to each other over time and express less strategic and interest-driven behavior, conforming to ever-increasing institutional pressures. A theory of isomorphism makes scientific predictions while its modern advancements do not. Drawing on Popper's idea of the limit of domains of explanation and limited domains of theories we present two propositions that may direct our attention towards the strength or weakness of institutional theories with regard to their explanations of organizational processes and behavior.

Practical implications

The paper draws implications for further theory building in institutional analysis by suggesting the nature of institutional explanations and the place of institutional change in the theoretical apparatus. Once institutional theory explains the tendency of the system towards equilibrium, there is no need to explain the origins and causes of radical change per se. Institutional isomorphism theory explains and predicts how even after radical changes organizational fields will move towards isomorphism, that is, institutional equilibrium. The task is, therefore, not to explain agency and change but to show that it is natural and inevitable processes that organizational field will return to isomorphic dynamics and move towards homogenization no matter how much radical change occurred in this field.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the practical problems with instrumental utility of institutional theories. In order to be useful any theory must clearly delineate its boundaries and offer explanations and predictions and it is only the former 1977/1983 institutional theory that satisfies these requirements while modern advancements merely offer ambiguous theoretical umbrellas that escape empirical tests. For researchers therefore it is important to recognize which theory can be applied in a given limited domain of research and which one has little or no value.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside

A valuable, although little-used, case data analysis technique, degrees-of-freedom analysis (DFA), is the subject of Chapter 12. Given the richness of case data and its…

Abstract

Synopsis

A valuable, although little-used, case data analysis technique, degrees-of-freedom analysis (DFA), is the subject of Chapter 12. Given the richness of case data and its prevalence in business marketing research, DFA has the potential to become an important addition to one's “research workbench.” Donald Campbell (1975) first proposed this theory testing.

This chapter presents three business-to-business marketing applications; the first two involve use of the technique to compare the extent to which four theories of group decision making are manifested in organizations. The third application illustrates how the technique is useful for theory development in the context of manufacturer–distributor relationships. The contribution is in demonstrating how researchers can link “traditional” (i.e., logical positivistic) hypothesis testing procedures to examine theoretical propositions in case study research. This approach is one way of achieving a critical test (Carlsmith, Ellsworth, & Aronson, 1976), that is, testing the relative empirical strengths of competing theories. The chapter highlights the value of generalizing case data to theory versus the inappropriate attempt to generalize such data to a population (Yin, 1994). The explication and demonstration of this technique is not available elsewhere to the degree that Chapter 12 provides.

Details

Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Patrick J. Murphy

The author applies methodological concepts from The Poverty of Historicism to contemporary research in the area of entrepreneurship. This paper aims to explain why current…

Downloads
1370

Abstract

Purpose

The author applies methodological concepts from The Poverty of Historicism to contemporary research in the area of entrepreneurship. This paper aims to explain why current theoretic models do not adequately explain entrepreneurial phenomena and to present outlines of a distinct entrepreneurship research paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The author examines the essay from the perspective of a historian and then summarizes its concepts. Next, the author reviews the current state of entrepreneurship research and theory and applies concepts from the essay to its contemporary challenges. Finally, the author presents five implications.

Findings

The five implications are that entrepreneurship research should include designs that predict failure, strive to develop theory that is distinct from other areas, emphasize novel arrangements of empirical elements that are also novel, utilize nonparametric statistics and case studies more fully, and push for a paradigmatic shift.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is useful to entrepreneurship scholars interested in developing and distinguishing their research area in a substantial and lasting way alongside other established research areas in the domain of business studies.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kevin D Carlson and Donald E Hatfield

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the…

Abstract

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the absence of metrics for gauging research progress that is most limiting. We propose that research should focus on measures of effect size and that “precision” and “generalizability” in our predictions of important phenomena represent the core metrics that should be used to judge whether progress is occurring. We then discuss how to employ these metrics and examine why existing research practices are likely to hinder efforts to develop cumulative knowledge.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Chien Liu

The current crisis of sociological theory is due to our failure to do sociology as a positive science‐our failure to accept both explanation and prediction as the goal of…

Abstract

The current crisis of sociological theory is due to our failure to do sociology as a positive science‐our failure to accept both explanation and prediction as the goal of theorizing, and to use predictive power as the primary criterion for assessing theories. It is argued that sociology as a positive science can advance sociological theory. It is also argued that a positive science of sociology is possible by correcting four major fallacies‐i.e., fallacies concerning controlled experiments, realism of assumptions, subjectivity, and complexity.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Hugh V. McLachlan and J.K. Swales

In a recent article, Boland attacks critics of Friedman's methodology. He writes:

Abstract

In a recent article, Boland attacks critics of Friedman's methodology. He writes:

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Huang Chang Mei, Shen Wei Hua and Xiao Xiao Cong

The paper attempts to establish GM(1,1) grey prediction model group for the top three Olympic track and field sports performance, and to predict the 30th London Olympic…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to establish GM(1,1) grey prediction model group for the top three Olympic track and field sports performance, and to predict the 30th London Olympic track and field results and its tendency using grey systems theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Athletics sports achievements are influenced by many factors, such as the physical quality, athletes individual growth cycle, and injuring or retirement of excellent athletes, the outstanding performance of some athletes, the using of high‐tech sports training instrument, the implementation plan of scientific training guidance, the introduction of advanced technology, facilities and improvement, and so on. Those aspects can make the match result uncertain, which are running in a uncertain and continually changing environment, so sports achievements have obviously grey features. Combined with grey modeling methods, and aimed at the top three Olympic track and field sports performance, this paper established GM (1,1) grey prediction model group and analysed the trend of Olympic track and field. And in the end of the paper, the 30th Olympic men's and women's the top three athletic achievements prediction intervals are also predicted.

Findings

The results show that forecasting model group has high‐precision. In the 46 champions prediction models, three models have the forecast accuracy of 100 percent; 27 models' forecast accuracy are greater than 99.5 percent, and the rest of the models forecast accuracy are greater than 98.58 percent. In the 46 silver medalists prediction models, five models have the forecast accuracy of 100 percent; 33 models' forecast accuracy are greater than 99.5 percent and the rest of the models' forecast accuracy is greater than 98.48 percent. In the 46 bronze medalist prediction models, four models have the forecast accuracy of 100 percent; 25 models' forecast accuracy is greater than 99.5 percent and the rest of the models forecast accuracy is greater than 98.76 percent. The essay deeply analyzes the top three achievements' trend of Olympic Games Track and field. In the end, the paper predicts the 30th Olympic track and field results.

Practical implications

The method exposed in the paper can be used for the short‐term or long‐term prediction of sports scores metering in international competition (such as track and field, swimming, rowing, etc.), and also for personal athletic performance prediction.

Originality/value

The paper succeeds in realising both grey prediction model group for the top three Olympic track and field performance in all projects, and prediction of the 30th London Olympic track and field results by using the newest developed theories: grey systems theory.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Wynne Chin, Jun-Hwa Cheah, Yide Liu, Hiram Ting, Xin-Jean Lim and Tat Huei Cham

Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) has become popular in the information systems (IS) field for modeling structural relationships between latent…

Downloads
1056

Abstract

Purpose

Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) has become popular in the information systems (IS) field for modeling structural relationships between latent variables as measured by manifest variables. However, while researchers using PLS-SEM routinely stress the causal-predictive nature of their analyses, the model evaluation assessment relies exclusively on criteria designed to assess the path model's explanatory power. To take full advantage of the purpose of causal prediction in PLS-SEM, it is imperative for researchers to comprehend the efficacy of various quality criteria, such as traditional PLS-SEM criteria, model fit, PLSpredict, cross-validated predictive ability test (CVPAT) and model selection criteria.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted to understand empirical studies employing the use of the causal prediction criteria available for PLS-SEM in the database of Industrial Management and Data Systems (IMDS) and Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ). Furthermore, this study discusses the details of each of the procedures for the causal prediction criteria available for PLS-SEM, as well as how these criteria should be interpreted. While the focus of the paper is on demystifying the role of causal prediction modeling in PLS-SEM, the overarching aim is to compare the performance of different quality criteria and to select the appropriate causal-predictive model from a cohort of competing models in the IS field.

Findings

The study found that the traditional PLS-SEM criteria (goodness of fit (GoF) by Tenenhaus, R2 and Q2) and model fit have difficulty determining the appropriate causal-predictive model. In contrast, PLSpredict, CVPAT and model selection criteria (i.e. Bayesian information criterion (BIC), BIC weight, Geweke–Meese criterion (GM), GM weight, HQ and HQC) were found to outperform the traditional criteria in determining the appropriate causal-predictive model, because these criteria provided both in-sample and out-of-sample predictions in PLS-SEM.

Originality/value

This research substantiates the use of the PLSpredict, CVPAT and the model selection criteria (i.e. BIC, BIC weight, GM, GM weight, HQ and HQC). It provides IS researchers and practitioners with the knowledge they need to properly assess, report on and interpret PLS-SEM results when the goal is only causal prediction, thereby contributing to safeguarding the goal of using PLS-SEM in IS studies.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 37000