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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Janice Miller, Brian Vivona and Gene Roth

Several issues are reported in the literature regarding the preparation and training of nurses for the preceptor role. The purpose of this study is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Several issues are reported in the literature regarding the preparation and training of nurses for the preceptor role. The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences, growth and development of nurses transitioning to the preceptor role in allied health contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A basic interpretive qualitative research method was used for this study. In total, 20 preceptors who were practicing in a variety of healthcare settings participated in in-depth interviews.

Findings

The preceptors of this study found meaning through their teaching and learning encounters with novice nurses. Their meaning making led to identity development and new perspectives on both the nursing and preceptor roles.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the literature on informal learning and training by focusing on the unique work role of nurse precepting. Conclusions of this study call for additional research that examines other occupational areas in which workers have transitioned from expert to novice again, and how training can enhance these transitions

Practical implications

Participants described several areas of improvement for preceptorships: additional administrative support, guidelines and standards for preceptor training and preparation and additional time and support for transitioning to the preceptor role

Originality/value

Work role transition theory was used in this study to examine the preparation and training of preceptors. This study features the voices of nursing preceptors who have experienced changes in their employment status and major shifts in their work roles transitioning from expert to novice to expert again.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Seth A. Kessler, Karissa D. Horton, Nell H. Gottlieb and Robin Atwood

The purpose of this study is to describe preceptors' implementation experiences after implementing a workplace learning program in Texas WIC (women, infant, and children…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe preceptors' implementation experiences after implementing a workplace learning program in Texas WIC (women, infant, and children) agencies and identify implementation best practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used qualitative description methodology. Data collection consisted of 11 semi‐structured interviews lasting approximately one hour with all preceptors who piloted a workplace learning program in five Texas local agencies to examine barriers, facilitating factors, best practices, and the workplace learning program's impact.

Findings

This research identified several workplace learning implementation best practices, including the importance of planning at multiple organizational levels, candidate selection, flexible implementation design, managerial buy‐in, preceptor knowledge and availability, open communication, and the establishment of clear expectations and timelines.

Originality/value

Examining implementation of a workplace learning program across a multi‐level public health service organization using a multi‐theoretical approach contributes to the existing workplace learning literature. Recommendations regarding implementation best practices are discussed.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Yee Mun Jessica Leong and Joanna Crossman

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of new nurses in Singapore of their experiences of role transition and to examine the implications for managers in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of new nurses in Singapore of their experiences of role transition and to examine the implications for managers in terms of employee training, development and retention.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was conducted using a constructivist grounded theory approach. In total 26 novice nurses and five preceptors (n=31) from five different hospitals participated in the study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and reflective journal entries and analysed using the constant comparative method.

Findings

The findings revealed that novice nurses remained emotionally and physically challenged when experiencing role transition. Two major constructs appear to play an important part in the transition process; learning how to Fit in and aligning personal with professional and organisational identities. The findings highlight factors that facilitate or impede Fitting in and aligning these identities.

Originality/value

Although the concept of Fitting in and its relation to the attrition of novice nurses has been explored in global studies, that relationship has not yet been theorised as the dynamic alignment of multiple identities. Also, whilst most research around Fitting in, identity and retention has been conducted in western countries, little is known about these issues and their interrelationship in the context of Singapore. The study should inform decision making by healthcare organisations, nurse managers and nursing training institutions with respect to improving the transition experience of novice nurses.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Mark Hecimovich and Simone Volet

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional confidence in health care students, with a view to identifying its impact on the development of professional confidence.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and ERIC (1980‐2009), which identified guided practice into the profession as being the most commonly examined educational opportunity increasing professional confidence. Empirical studies that had rigorous research design and methods were selected for in‐depth review. However, in light of the paucity of the extant research, a few studies reporting anecdotal accounts of the development of professional confidence through guided practice were also included.

Findings

The review revealed how guided practice into the profession can contribute significantly to students' development of professional confidence. The review also points to arguable relationships between confidence and competence and the importance of better understanding and addressing the issue of under‐ and over‐confidence. The review highlights when evidence of the effectiveness of learning opportunities was insufficient or unreliable, with some directions for future research.

Research limitations/implications

The review was based on a selection of papers most representative of research examining the effectiveness of guided professional practice learning opportunities to promote the development of professional confidence, and therefore is not a systematic review of all the extant literature.

Originality/value

It provides insight into the conditions under which guided practice into the profession can contribute to enhancing professional confidence, which is important, given the nature of its relationship with professional competence.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Geraldine R. MacCarrick

This paper aims to describe the educational philosophy and practice underpinning the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators (RACMA) program and how it is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the educational philosophy and practice underpinning the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators (RACMA) program and how it is aligned with the needs of the Australian and New Zealand health care systems. Preparing future doctors as medical leaders requires keeping pace with developments in medical education and increased sophistication on the part of teaching and supervising faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a descriptive case study. The data are complemented by workforce data and excerpts from the RACMA Management and Leadership Curriculum.

Findings

The RACMA has developed a program informed by current best practices in medical education. The educational underpinnings and instructional practices of the RACMA emphasize leadership as a collaborative social process and the importance of relational leadership in successful modern day practice. The ongoing development of the program has a focus on setting of clear learning objectives, regular and continuous feedback to trainees and reflective practice facilitated by the close relationship between trainees and their preceptor.

Research limitations/implications

Although a site-specific case study, the application of relational models of teaching can be applied in other settings.

Practical implications

The application of relational models of teaching can be applied in other settings.

Social implications

This paper fulfils a social need to describe successful competency models used for medical leadership development.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to define competency models used as a foundation for medical leadership development.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Challenges are inherent with any transition to a new work role. With appropriate training and support mechanisms in place, anxieties can be reduced so that individuals become better prepared to meet objectives and make the transition successful.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Jeremy Sebastian Chitpin and Stephanie Chitpin

Through a series of critical discussions on Karl Popper’s evolutionary analysis of learning and the non-authoritarian values it promotes, the purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Through a series of critical discussions on Karl Popper’s evolutionary analysis of learning and the non-authoritarian values it promotes, the purpose of this paper is to advocate a Popperian approach for building medical student knowledge. Specifically, it challenges positivist assumptions that permeate the design and management of many educational institutions, including teaching hospitals, by considering what does and does not happen when learning takes place.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate how Popper’s approach differs from such a conception of learning, the paper examines the exchange between a preceptor (Sam) and a medical student (Lisa). The following exchange is based on the observations during a team meeting in a Canadian teaching hospital. The authors sent the transcript of the observation to Lisa for her comments. The statements in italics represent Lisa’s additions. Pseudonyms are used to protect the identity of participants in the exchange.

Findings

Popper’s evolutionary analysis of learning and the Objective Knowledge Growth Framework provide a means of managing specific aspects of one’s education through engaging in this learning process. Although this approach to teaching and decision making takes time to master, it does not require reconstituting existing institutional arrangements before it can be implemented in hospitals. Instead, it asks medical students, teachers and practitioners to be open to the theoretical underpinnings of the approach and to view knowledge growth as a process of systematic trial and error elimination.

Originality/value

This paper is original in its conceptualisation and may well become a classic in education circles. It draws on Popper’s philosophical arguments and enters into a much needed discourse for teaching and learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Sine Lehn-Christiansen and Mari Holen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how clinical nurse education and nursing students’ care practices are shaped by different logics of care.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how clinical nurse education and nursing students’ care practices are shaped by different logics of care.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by Mol’s work on care, the paper explores care practices connected to the clinical education of nurses. The empirical data were generated from longitudinal, multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork among nursing students in clinical practice combined with follow-up interviews with the students and their supervisors.

Findings

The paper illustrates how three logics of care shape clinical education: the logic of relational care, the logic of care education and the logic of care production. The paper demonstrates how the logics unfold and entangle in everyday clinical education. On the one hand, care of patients based on the relationship between patient and nurse is highly valued. On the other hand, this logic is not institutionalized in the same way as practices induced by the logic of care production and the logic of care education.

Originality/value

The paper may be of value to scholars and practitioners in clinical education, as well as to health educational policy makers. The findings focus on paradoxes produced by conflicting logics in practice, thus offering new reflections and alternative sensemaking of well-known problems connected to clinical education.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Joyce Weil, Gwyneth Milbrath, Teresa Sharp, Jeanette McNeill, Elizabeth Gilbert, Kathleen Dunemn, Marcia Patterson and Audrey Snyder

Integrated transitions of care for rural older persons are key issues in policy and practice. Interdisciplinary partnerships are suggested as ways to improve rural-care…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated transitions of care for rural older persons are key issues in policy and practice. Interdisciplinary partnerships are suggested as ways to improve rural-care transitions by blending complementary skills of disciplines to increase care’s holistic nature. Yet, only multidisciplinary efforts are frequently used in practice and often lack synergy and collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of a partnership model using nursing, gerontology and public health integration to support rural-residing elders as a part of building an Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner program.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland/O’Sullivan framework to examine the creation of an interdisciplinary team. Two examples of interdisciplinary work are discussed. They are the creation of an interdisciplinary public health course and its team-based on-campus live simulations with a panel and site visit.

Findings

With team-building successes and challenges, outcomes show the need for knowledge exchange among practitioners to enhance population-centered and person-centered care to improve health care services to older persons in rural areas.

Practical implications

There is a need to educate providers about the importance of developing interdisciplinary partnerships. Educational programming illustrates ways to move team building through the interdisciplinary continuum. Dependent upon the needs of the community, other similarly integrated partnership models can be developed.

Originality/value

Transitions of care work for older people tends to be multi- or cross-disciplinary. A model for interdisciplinary training of gerontological practitioners in rural and frontier settings broadens the scope of care and improves the health of the rural older persons served.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

A Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence Approach to Institutional Effectiveness in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-900-8

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