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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Ernestine Ndzi

This paper aim to examine the implication of section 172(1)(b) on employment rights, particularly on workers on precarious employment contracts. The aim of the paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aim to examine the implication of section 172(1)(b) on employment rights, particularly on workers on precarious employment contracts. The aim of the paper is to analyse whether company directors have any liability for potential abuse of worker on precarious employment contracts. The paper examine the advantage of companies recruiting staff on precarious employment contracts and the effect of such contract on the worker.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews case law, statutory provisions and academic opinions on precarious employment contracts and its advantages and disadvantages to the company and the worker. The paper critically reviews the impact of Section 172(1)(b) of the Companies Act 2006 on precarious employment contract workers.

Findings

The paper argues that companies benefit more from precarious employment contracts than workers do. The Companies Act 2006 is silent on whether directors should factor the interest of precarious employment worker when making company decision, thereby leaving these workers in a vulnerable position and at the mercy of the employers.

Originality/value

The paper offers a different argument about why the use of precarious employment contracts is on the rise in the UK. It highlights the silence of the Companies Act 2006 as a driver for the increase in the use of precarious employment contracts in the UK.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Ana Carvalho and Carlos Cabral‐Cardoso

This paper aims to examine how functional and numerical flexibility can be successfully combined without workforce segmentation or flexible employment contracts, by…

5840

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how functional and numerical flexibility can be successfully combined without workforce segmentation or flexible employment contracts, by implementing a highly integrated human resource management (HRM) system.

Design/methodology/approach

Six case studies were conducted between January 2002 and June 2003 in Portuguese affiliates of multinational management consulting firms using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Evidence from the case studies showed that some of these companies were able to explore both functional and numerical flexibility in a combined and interdependent way, by operating a tightly run and highly coordinated set of HRM practices geared towards the development of internal labour markets.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a sample of large multinational companies in a single sector, which limits the scope of these findings.

Practical implications

It is suggested that a strategy combining numerical and functional flexibility through an integrated set of HRM policies and practices will be more effective than segmenting the workforce or choosing between those two sources of flexibility.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new breadth for the role of HRM in achieving flexibility. Theoretically, it challenges the established notion that commitment‐based HRM serves only functional flexibility and that numerical flexibility can only be achieved through precarious employment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Wen Wang and Roger Seifert

The study intends to examine employee relations with a changing workforce resulting from the business-like transformation in the charity sector. The authors investigated…

Abstract

Purpose

The study intends to examine employee relations with a changing workforce resulting from the business-like transformation in the charity sector. The authors investigated sector-specific employment practices that can alleviate job stress (as a given and which has been made worse by the transformation). Developed from the intrinsic and extrinsic motivation framework, the findings can inform human resource management practices in its new efficiency-seeking business model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected both quantitative (through a staff survey and administrative records of sick leave in the previous 12 months) and qualitative data (through interviews and focus groups) from one branch of an internationally well-established and UK-based religious charity between 2017 and 2018.

Findings

The quantitative results support a strong mediating effect of job satisfaction between job stress and staff sick leave. The negative correlation shown between job stress and job satisfaction is subject to paid staff perception of meaningful work and their level of involvement in decision-making, with the latter having a stronger moderating effect. The qualitative data provides further contextualized evidence on the findings.

Practical implications

It is important for charities to uphold and reflect their charitable mission towards beneficiaries and paid staff during the shift to an efficiency-seeking business model. Charities should involve their new professional workforce in strategic decision-making to better shape a context-based operational model.

Originality/value

The study examined employee relations in the non-profit charity sector with a changing workforce during the transition to a more business-oriented model. In particular, the authors revealed sector-specific factors that can moderate the association between job stress and absenteeism, and thereby contribute to the understanding of human resource management practices in the sector.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

David Biggs and Stephen Swailes

To investigate the level of organizational commitment in agency workers compared with permanent workers by taking into account relations between the two groups.

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Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the level of organizational commitment in agency workers compared with permanent workers by taking into account relations between the two groups.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods design was employed comprising of a quantitative survey of 157 call centre workers followed by 29 qualitative interviews with permanent workers, agency workers and employers.

Findings

Agency workers had a significantly lower level of organizational commitment compared with permanent workers once the relation between agency and permanent workers was controlled. Significant correlations were found within the sample between organizational commitment, being valued and job satisfaction further supported by a hierarchical multiple linear regression.

Research limitations/implications

As with all cross‐sectional research causality cannot be confirmed and difficulty accessing call centre workers led to a restricted sample size. The measurement of worker relations needs developing. Further research is proposed to address these limitations and extend the findings.

Practical implications

The implication for human resource management is that employers must be aware of the possible adverse influence that agency workers may have on permanent workers and as such try to incorporate agency workers within the organization to support their commitment.

Originality/value

Previous studies have found inconsistent variations in the relative organizational commitment of permanent and temporary employees; a counter‐intuitive finding given the precarious employment contract held by temporary workers. This study casts light on these results by controlling for the relation between agency workers and permanent workers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Srinath Jagannathan, Patturaja Selvaraj and Jerome Joseph

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the appropriation of the value generated by workers across the production networks of international business.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the engagement with crematorium workers, the narratives of workers are articulated, describing the insecurities and injustices experienced by them. The authors draw from six-month-long qualitative engagement with seven workers in a crematorium in Ahmedabad, India.

Findings

The experience of marginal subjects provides important insights into how international business, in conjunction with states, structures inequality for marginal subjects. Precariousness, social exclusion, low wages and subjectivities of humiliation are the experiences of marginal subjects. The reproduction of marginality in globalising cities is an important element of the funeralesque through which extraction and re-distribution of value across international networks is legitimised.

Practical implications

In understanding international business as the funeralesque, the authors demystify the power relations constituted by it. The authors provide a metaphor for dethroning the legitimacy of international business and indicate that its modern practices are similar to the practices of value appropriation that occur in a funeral.

Originality/value

The authors develop the metaphor of the funeralesque to gain insights into the experiences of workers on the margins of international business. The authors are, thus, able to theorise the underbelly of globalising cities in a poetic, subversive way.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Matilde Lafuente-Lechuga, Ursula Faura-Martínez and Olga García-Luque

This paper studies social inequality in the vital field of employment in Spain during the crisis period 2009-2014.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper studies social inequality in the vital field of employment in Spain during the crisis period 2009-2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Factor analysis is used to build a synthetic index of employment exclusion. The starting information matrix collects data from a wide set of employment variables for all 17 Spanish autonomous communities and the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla. Based on this information, four factors are extracted which explain employment exclusion in different situations of vulnerability, such as unemployment, temporality, poverty or low pay.

Findings

In the territorial ranking, Madrid, Basque Country, Aragon and Catalonia show the lowest risk of employment exclusion, whereas Ceuta, Andalusia, Extremadura and Canary Islands show the highest ones.

Originality/value

The main value of this research is that it confirms the need for coordination of public policies in order to foster social and territorial cohesion in Spain.

Details

Applied Economic Analysis, vol. 27 no. 80
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-7627

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Selling Our Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-239-4

Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Thomas Garavan, Geraldine Matthews-Smith, Ann Marie Gill and Fergal O’Brien

Purpose: Talent management and in particular strategic talent management (STM) has emerged as an important issue for hospitality organisations worldwide. In this chapter…

Abstract

Purpose: Talent management and in particular strategic talent management (STM) has emerged as an important issue for hospitality organisations worldwide. In this chapter, we address some of the complexities evident in hospitality organisations in relation to the practice of STM, the types of internal and external STM issues that arise and both the research and practice implications of pursuing STM in hospitality organisations.

Methodology/Approach: This chapter presents a review of the literature on the wider topic of STM, with particular focus on the integration of issues and themes identified in the hospitality management literature related to STM perspectives.

Findings: We find that STM is a topical issue for hospitality organisations irrespective of size, complexity, or geographic location. However, research that explicitly addresses STM in hospitality is nascent leaving many unanswered questions. The notion of what constitutes STM is shaped by the complexities and values of the hospitality industry itself and its meaning is not necessarily the same as in other industry contexts. However, as yet we do not have sufficient insights to reach conclusions as to what STM truly looks like in hospitality organisations.

Research Implications: Here, we add to the literature, highlighting the need for more research on the many dimensions of STM in hospitality organisations including its antecedents, processes, and outcomes and the extent to which it is different in hospitality organisations compared to multinational corporations and public sector organisations.

Practical Implications: We highlight a number of practical implications around roles, processes, practices, and skillsets to utilise a strategic approach to talent management in hospitality organisations.

Originality/Value: This chapter continues the debate as to the role of STM in hospitality organisations as well as providing a more focussed agenda for both future research and practice. We also analyse and critique the internal and external forces and pressures that shape STM in hospitality organisations.

Details

Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Andreas Diedrich

The integration of refugees into the labor market and society is widely seen as one of the most profound challenges of our times and many support initiatives are underway…

Abstract

The integration of refugees into the labor market and society is widely seen as one of the most profound challenges of our times and many support initiatives are underway to help refugees enter the labor market and the new society. This chapter explores the role of intermediary figures who are at home in more than one cultural context and mediate and support others in bridging cultural boundaries, so-called culture brokers, in these efforts. It deals with how cultural brokering is enacted as part of labor market integration support efforts for refugees and explores the potential consequences of such organizing efforts for the refugees targeted as well as the organizers. The chapter argues that the success or failure of culture brokering is better understood as the result of the actions of the many actors involved in organizing than as being dependent on the skills, attributes and experiences of the individual culture broker. It draws on observations from a qualitative field study undertaken between 2017 and 2019 of two integration support initiatives in Gothenburg, Sweden's second largest city.

Details

Intercultural Management in Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-827-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Usha Ajithkumar and Matthias Pilz

The purpose of this paper is to conduct the study in two states of India to covers the perception of students and their parents about the attractiveness of Industrial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct the study in two states of India to covers the perception of students and their parents about the attractiveness of Industrial Training Institutes (ITI) in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Three ITIs were selected each from the states Maharashtra and Haryana for data collection. Students pursuing trade fitter, electrical and beauty courses and their parents were selected. The instrument used to collect the data from students and parents was interviews with students and families.

Findings

The results show that the attractiveness of ITIs has shifted over time. The low status associated with these institutions is slowly fading away. The skills acquired at an ITI can provide the basis of successful careers. Once considered a last resort, today it is being considered as a possible career option. However, ITIs have yet to develop a better image and higher attractiveness within society for it to become an interesting option for young people and their parents when choosing educational pathways.

Originality/value

Some implications of this study are presented as suggestions in formulating policies to improve the image of technical education and vocational training.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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