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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

S. Sarkar

Optimum balance of intestinal microbiota can be modulated by such dietary means as probiotics and prebiotics. Combination of probiotics and prebiotics could improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

Optimum balance of intestinal microbiota can be modulated by such dietary means as probiotics and prebiotics. Combination of probiotics and prebiotics could improve the survivality of probiotic candidate due to availability of substrate for its fermentation and confer greater advantages to the host. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential of prebiotics as functional foods.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the selection criteria for prebiotic, their postulated health benefits and safety aspects for their inclusion in infant formula. Potentiality of prebiotics for their exploitation as functional foods has also been delineated.

Findings

Probiotics, when applied in conjugation with prebiotics give rise to another possibility in microflora management technique known as synbiotics, which could improve the survivality of probiotic candidate and confer greater advantages to the host. Inclusion of prebiotics like fructo‐oligosaccharide and galacto‐oligosaccharide as infant formula ingredients is suggested. Health benefit properties of prebiotics suggest their application as functional foods.

Originality/value

Ingestion of cultured milk products containing probiotic cultures and prebiotics may provide health benefits in terms of colonization and normalization of intestinal flora and could be recommended for consumption as functional foods.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Silvia Marina González-Herrera, Raul Rodriguez Herrera, Mercedes Guadalupe López, Olga Miriam Rutiaga, Cristobal Noe Aguilar, Juan Carlos Contreras Esquivel and Luz Araceli Ochoa Martínez

The purpose of this paper is to explore the variety of food in which it has been applied as a prebiotic and functional ingredient, the concentrations used there in, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the variety of food in which it has been applied as a prebiotic and functional ingredient, the concentrations used there in, the tests that have been conducted on these fortified foods and briefly reviews the history and characteristics of inulin.

Design/methodology/approach

The review included articles from 1999-2013. The papers which reported inulin concentrations used, the purpose of the application and tests on final product, were mainly selected. Articles were collected in electronic databases such as Elsevier-Science Direct, Emerald, Springer Link, Wiley and Redalyc.

Findings

The interaction inulin-food with different food matrices is complex, and is not always technologically favorable for the product. Moreover, additional to evaluations of sensory, physicochemical and rheological characteristics, it is essential to carry out measurements in the food, of such characteristics as prebiotic content, and prebiotic activity in vivo and in vitro, and assess potential adverse reactions in order to define suitable doses of consumption.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of conducting in vitro and in vivo testing of potential prebiotic inulin-supplemented food in order to define dose that benefit health and do not cause unacceptable gastrointestinal distress.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Zahra Mohebbi, Maryam Azizi-Lalabadi, Sayyed Javad Hosseini, Sajjad Abdi Nowrouzani, Mohammad Alizadeh and Aziz Homayouni

The enrichment of bread with non-digestible prebiotic ingredients may exert health-promoting effects and provide healthier food choices for those suffering from metabolic…

Abstract

Purpose

The enrichment of bread with non-digestible prebiotic ingredients may exert health-promoting effects and provide healthier food choices for those suffering from metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ß-glucan and resistant starch incorporation on the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of white bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven different formulations of prebiotic bread were produced using different proportions of ß-glucan (0.8, 1 and 1.2 per cent), resistant starch (5.5, 8 and 10.5 per cent) and the combination of resistant starch and ß-glucan in a ratio of 4:0.5.

Findings

The GI and GL of the prebiotic bread prepared with 1 per cent ß-glucan (w/w) were 55.7 and 7.8, respectively, whereas those of the prebiotic bread prepared with 8 per cent resistant starch (w/w) were 64.8 and 8.42, respectively, with both breads having significantly lower GI and GL values than the control (P < 0.05). It was concluded that the incorporation of 1 per cent ß-glucan may be beneficial in producing prebiotic bread with both low GI and low GL.

Originality/value

Although white bread is a main food source in human diet, its high GI and GL make it an unhealthy food choice. The incorporation of ingredients with prebiotic effects, such as ß-glucan and resistant starch, can improve the nutritional value of this product by lowering its GI and GL.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Angelica Carreira dos Santos, Daniel Araki Ribeiro, Jessica Almeida da Cruz Ferreira, Odair Aguiar, Dan Linetzky Waitzberg and Claudia Cristina Alves

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on liver histopathology and TLR-4, NFκB and TNF-α gene…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on liver histopathology and TLR-4, NFκB and TNF-α gene expression involved in the inflammatory cascade and pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Design/methodology/approach

Wistar male adult rats (n = 40) were submitted to hypercholesterolemic conditions (60 days). On Day 30 of hypercholesterolemic conditions, rats were subdivided in five groups: negative control (NC), positive control (PC), prebiotic (PRE), probiotic (PRO) and synbiotic (SYN). All rats were sacrificed on Day 60. Liver tissue was used to verify histopathological changes and gene expression. Gene expression of TLR-4, TNF-α and NFκB was evaluated in liver tissue using RT-qPCR.

Findings

Histopathological analysis: PC showed more changes than NC, and PRE and SYN showed fewer alterations than PC. Gene expression analysis: PRE showed higher TLR-4, and NFκB and TNF-α compared to PC. Also, PRE showed higher TLR-4 when compared to PRO and SYN. SYN group revealed higher TLR-4 and NFκB expressions compared to PC. PRO group also showed higher NFκB expression compared to PC.

Originality/value

NAFLD is a significant health concern, and it found that prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic supplementation could have positive effects as a nonpharmacological approach to control this disease.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Richard Frank Tester and Farage H. Al-Ghazzewi

This paper aims to focus on the utilisation of pre- and probiotics for oral care and the state of knowledge at this time.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the utilisation of pre- and probiotics for oral care and the state of knowledge at this time.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre- and probiotics describe beneficial carbohydrates and microbiota, respectively, for optimal gut health. Carbohydrates provide energy selectively for the gut-friendly bacteria. The use of both carbohydrates and bacteria is, however, being expanded into other areas of the body – including the skin, vagina and oral cavity – for health-related applications.

Findings

There is increased interest in both pre- and probiotics for oral care products. The importance of oral microflora and their selective substrates is discussed against a background of contemporary oral care approaches. The issues and benefits are discussed in this review.

Originality/value

It is clear that consumption of prebiotics and probiotics may play a role as potential prophylactic or therapeutic agents for reducing the presence of organisms in the mouth associated with tooth decay. To confirm a beneficial effect of pre- and probiotics further in vivo studies involving healthy human volunteers should be considered.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Amir Reza Moravejolahkami, Zamzam Paknahad and Ahmad Chitsaz

Dietary fiber and energy intakes seem to be related to disability and anthropometric indices in multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central…

Abstract

Purpose

Dietary fiber and energy intakes seem to be related to disability and anthropometric indices in multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. So, this study was designed to investigate the association between dietary fiber and energy intakes with systemic inflammation, disease severity and anthropometric measurements in MS subjects.

Design/methodology/approach

Four subtypes of 261 MS volunteers were recruited (female = 210, male = 51; mean age 38.9 ± 8.3). A 168-item food frequency questionnaire and nutritionist IV software were used to estimate the amounts of dietary, insoluble, soluble, crude fiber and energy intakes. Serum hs-CRP, extended disability status scale (EDSS), height, weight and Deurenberg equation were also used to evaluate systemic inflammation, disease severity, body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat, respectively.

Findings

Mean differences among the three hs-CRP and EDSS subgroups for dietary fibers and energy intake were significant (p <0.001). Dietary fiber intake (M = 19.9 ± 4.3 g/day) was a good predictor for EDSS (B = −0.196, p =0.012), and insoluble fiber intake was introduced as the best predictor of hs-CRP (B = −3.293, p <0.001). Energy intake predicted both BMI (B = 0.007, p <0.001) and percentage body fat (B = 0.015, p <0.001).

Originality/value

Hypocaloric and high prebiotic fiber diet may suppress systemic inflammation and thereby modulate disease severity, as well as control anthropometric indices.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Amel Ibrahim, Sameh Awad and Mahmoud El-Sayed

The effect of pomegranate whole and inside peels before and after extraction of the tannic acid have been carried out in stimulated media and in gastrointestinal conditions

Abstract

Purpose

The effect of pomegranate whole and inside peels before and after extraction of the tannic acid have been carried out in stimulated media and in gastrointestinal conditions

Design/methodology/approach

Adding pomegranate peels with and without tannins at different levels to bio-stirred yoghurt to study its effect as prebiotic, in addition to evaluating the effect on physiochemical, sensorial and rheological properties

Findings

The results reveal that pomegranate peels before and after removing tannins had no effect on the viability of a single strain of Lb. acidophilus in stimulated media, while the growth of mixed probiotic culture (Lb.acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum) was enhanced when pomegranate peels (whole and inside part) free from tannins were used. Tannin-free pomegranate peels enhanced the viability of probiotic culture under gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, all probiotic cultures were maintained counts around log 8 cfu /g in stirred bio-yoghurt supplements with pomegranate peels after 21days. Bio-yoghurt supplemented with pomegranate peels at 0.5% gained high scores for overall acceptability.

Originality/value

Pomegranate has been recognized as a good source of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Some researchers have utilized pomegranate peel in fermented milk, but most of the studies have found that tannins inhibit the bacterial culture. This study recommended that the supplementation of low-fat bio-yoghurt with tannin-free pomegranate peels enhanced the texture properties, viscosity of the product, as well as the viability of probiotic culture during shelf life. Therefore, the tannin-free pomegranate peel could be used as a prebiotic in functional fermented dairy products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Driene Gomes Gonzaga, Rafaela Corrêa Pereira, Andressa Alvarenga Silva, Soraia Vilela Borges, João de Deus Souza Carneiro, Raimundo Vicente de Sousa and Michel Cardoso de Angelis-Pereira

The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam, containing marolo, sweet passion fruit and soursop, enriched with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam, containing marolo, sweet passion fruit and soursop, enriched with polydextrose and fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and evaluate in vivo the effect of consumption of this product.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 48 male rats were divided into six groups and fed a AIN-93M rodent diet supplemented with 10% jam enriched with different proportions of FOS and polydextrose. The effects on glycemic response, mineral utilization and fecal and histological characteristics were evaluated.

Findings

The addition of the jams enriched with the fibers in different levels based on current legislation, in the diet of the rats, for 30 days, did not affect significantly (p = 0.05) parameters such as daily mean consumption (DMC) and daily weight gain (DWG), fecal weight, mineral absorption, glycemic responses and glycemic index of the diets and histological parameters. Moisture and ether extract contents of the stool, however, were positively affect by these ingredients. These parameters were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in groups treated with FOS and polydextrose.

Originality/value

The sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam besides to increase availability and add value to exotic Brazilian fruits could be an alimentary source of interest. However, more specific studies, aimed at questioning and confirming the optimal doses of prebiotics to normal and dysglycemic individuals and with longer duration, are needed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Marilyn G.F. Kuntz, Giovanna M.R. Fiates and Evanilda Teixeira

The purpose of this paper is to identify food products being developed with the addition of the prebiotic inulin (a soluble, fermentable dietary fibre that stimulates the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify food products being developed with the addition of the prebiotic inulin (a soluble, fermentable dietary fibre that stimulates the growth of beneficial bacteria in the colon), in order to determine how its addition modifies their probiotic, physicochemical and sensory characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is a systematic review of the Web of Science, Medline/Pubmed and Scielo‐Br electronic databases, from 2001 to 2011. Of the 256 abstracts initially retrieved, those reporting development of products containing inulin were included, while those regarding literature review, clinical investigations, inulin extraction and effects on the human body were excluded. Full papers of all the 28 studies identified as relevant to the aims of the review were then obtained.

Findings

Inulin quantities added to products varied from 1 to 32 per cent. Products containing inulin had improved microorganism counts and received either equal or better scores in sensory analysis tests. pH and colour of high fat content products were not significantly altered by inulin addition. Texture profile of high protein and carbohydrate content products was irregularly altered by inulin addition. Food composition was found to determine the necessary amount of inulin to induce the desired changes. Highest added quantities were observed in the group of products with high carbohydrate content.

Originality/value

The paper presents a compilation of information regarding inulin percentage needed to alter physicochemical and sensory characteristics of products with different protein, fat and carbohydrate content.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Maede Mohseni, Mohamad Reza Ehsani and Ali Mohamadi Sani

The aim of this study is to produce non‐fermented symbiotic milk with natural taste and to evaluate the effect of prebiotics including inulin, lactolose and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to produce non‐fermented symbiotic milk with natural taste and to evaluate the effect of prebiotics including inulin, lactolose and galacto‐oligosaccharides (respectively in 0.6, 0.4 and 1.6% w/w) on probiotics count of Lactobacillus acidophilus (La‐5) and Bifidobacterium bifidus (lactis) (Bb‐12) in cooled pasteurized milk.

Design/methodology/approach

The probiotic cultures (count: 109 CFU/mL, dosage: 0.01% w/v) and prebiotics were added to 2.5% fat milk in Pegah pasteurized milk factory. The chemical properties of milk and the survival of La5 and Bb12 were studied at 4°C during ten days.

Findings

Results of sensory evaluation tests showed that none of the symbiotic samples were acceptable after ten days. So the minimum acceptance time of the samples was seven days except for the lactolose one. When compared to the control sample, at day 0, the viable counts for both L. acidophilus La‐5 and B. bifidus(lactis) Bb‐12 significantly increased in the symbiotic milk by addition of lactolose (P<0.05) due to possible probiotic effects of this source.

Originality/value

No research had been done to produce non‐fermented symbiotic milk in Iran. The minimum shelf life of the product was one week.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 173