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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Carsten Christoph Schermuly, Victoria Büsch and Carolin Graßmann

The desired retirement age (DRA) becomes more important because some countries adapt their strict retirement regulations to it. A process is tested for how psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

The desired retirement age (DRA) becomes more important because some countries adapt their strict retirement regulations to it. A process is tested for how psychological empowerment influences the DRA mediated by psychological and physical strain and how the DRA is connected to the expected retirement age (ERA). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured interviews with 1,485 German employees (55 years and older) were conducted via telephone.

Findings

Psychological and physical strain mediated both the relationship between psychological empowerment and the DRA. DRA and ERA were positively associated. The control variables – age, net income, and organizational size – also significantly affected the DRA.

Research limitations/implications

The results are only valid for the German job market. All variables were collected at one measurement point.

Practical implications

The strengthening of psychological empowerment can be one measure to motivate older employees to delay their retirement and finally keep them longer in the labor force.

Originality/value

A large sample was collected and interviewed via telephone, which helps to overcome some limitations of questionnaire research. The process model helps to understand how job characteristics are connected with the DRA and the ERA.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

David S. Wolpert

As a result of the recent changes in world politics, especially in Eastern Europe (and between the United States and the Soviet Union), there has been a re‐evaluation of…

Abstract

As a result of the recent changes in world politics, especially in Eastern Europe (and between the United States and the Soviet Union), there has been a re‐evaluation of the United States military forces. There is a movement to develop a variety of ways to trim the numbers of those in the active duty military. At the same time, there is a recognised need to offer assistance to those departing the military and to enable them to make a smooth transition into the civilian world of work. Although the research reported here was conducted over two years ago and focused on those retiring from the military, the issues raised may be more relevant today.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Daniel C. Feldman and William H. Turnley

In light of significant changes over the past decade in the nature of the workforce, the workplace, and retirement itself, this article examines the factors that…

Abstract

In light of significant changes over the past decade in the nature of the workforce, the workplace, and retirement itself, this article examines the factors that predispose employees to retire. The study uses a sample of older workers who had attended pre‐retirement planning sessions open to employees over age 45. Results suggest that employment status of spouse (rather than marital status per se), continuous years of service (rather than salary), the physical demands of the job (rather than overall health), and certainty about the plans for retirement (rather than the content of those plans) are significantly related to intentions to retire.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Roberta Adami, Orla Gough and Angeliki Theophilopoulou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how changes in the distribution of pre retirement labour earnings affect post‐retirement income in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how changes in the distribution of pre retirement labour earnings affect post‐retirement income in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate a PROBIT model and perform a counterfactual simulation to assess the effects of changes in the earnings distributions on pensions in the UK. The paper uses data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS).

Findings

The distribution of labour earnings before retirement plays a considerable role in the pension distribution of current retirees, particularly for low and medium incomes in the period 1991‐2007 for the UK. Improvements in Social Security have lifted many out of poverty; however there is still a gender gap as it is found that the current system of public and private schemes has not substantially improved pension income dispersion among women. On the other hand, changes in labour earning distributions have benefited more poor female pensioners than male.

Originality/value

The paper uses BHPS data, which is a longitudinal panel of survey questions made to UK households between 1991 and 2007. The level of detail of such data allows the study of the complete distributions of pre and post retirement income rather than focussing only on some measures of dispersion.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Caroline Tynan

Older consumers, that is, those people nearingor at retirement age, are increasingly beingrecognised as an important market segment. Thissegment is reviewed and some ways…

Abstract

Older consumers, that is, those people nearing or at retirement age, are increasingly being recognised as an important market segment. This segment is reviewed and some ways for the marketer to approach it are suggested.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Caroline Tynan

Woopies (Well Off Older People), otherwise recognised as matureconsumers who are reasonably prosperous, have been largely ignored as amarket segment so far. As their…

Abstract

Woopies (Well Off Older People), otherwise recognised as mature consumers who are reasonably prosperous, have been largely ignored as a market segment so far. As their numbers increase, which they will do into and beyond the foreseeable future they will become an even more significant segment. Their views on money, holidays and transport are examined, and it is concluded that these people have specific needs which are not at present being met.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Bishakha Mazumdar, Amy M. Warren and Kathryne E. Dupré

Few studies aim to uniquely conceptualize the experiences of bridge employees after they enter the workforce. Supported by the psychological contract theory and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies aim to uniquely conceptualize the experiences of bridge employees after they enter the workforce. Supported by the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the bridge employment experience by examining how the expectations of bridge employees shape their experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first reviews the extant literature on bridge employment. It then discusses the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, and examines the expectations of bridge employees through the theoretical perspectives of these two theories, to examine experiences in bridge employment.

Findings

Discord in the bridge employment relationship may be attributed to a lack of understanding of the implicit expectations of bridge employees. More specifically, unmet expectations may be detrimental to the bridge employment experience, and ultimately jeopardize both employer and employee outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines expectations and experiences of bridge employees from a theoretical perspective. Theoretical tenets are utilized to analyze how and why implicit expectations may influence bridge employees in ways that result in detrimental outcomes for both employers and employees.

Practical implications

This paper sheds light on why bridge employment arrangements may result in adverse outcomes. Specifically, when there is a lack of understanding between bridge employees’ expectations and experiences, both individual and organizational outcomes may be impaired. An improved understanding of the bridge employment experience will likely result in an enhanced working relationship between bridge employees and employers, and minimize misunderstandings about this cohort of the workforce.

Originality/value

Using the guidelines of the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, we develop a model to examine how expectation of bridge employees may affect the experiences and ultimately, the outcomes of bridge employment. The authors also identify factors uniquely applicable to bridge employees. This is the first paper that examines the experiences of bridge employees through such theoretical perspectives.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Joanna Walker

Discusses the changing composition of the retired population interms of age and volume and the need for pre‐ and post‐retirementeducation programmes with counselling as an…

Abstract

Discusses the changing composition of the retired population in terms of age and volume and the need for pre‐ and post‐retirement education programmes with counselling as an important component. Policy making, employee learning and development, and employee assistance and counselling are discussed while some approaches to retirement education and the position of women and ethnic minorities are examined.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Francine Schlosser, Deborah Zinni and Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce since their retirement and those who had previously unretired.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey collected data from 460 recent retirees between the ages of 50 and 70.

Findings

Results of hierarchical regression indicated that retirees are more likely to remain retired if they feel financially secure and have a positive retirement experience. Conversely, they are more likely to intend to return to the workforce if they experience financial worries, wish to upgrade their skills or miss aspects of their former jobs.

Practical implications

Aging boomers who anticipate early retirement have created a dwindling labor pool. Simultaneously, the global pension crisis has impacted on the financial decisions of retirees. A trend to abolish mandatory retirement and/or increase mandatory age in various countries provides individuals with more freedom in their retirement decisions. Accordingly, managers must be creative in their HR planning strategies to retain or recruit skilled retirees.

Originality/value

Previous research has addressed retirement as a final stage, however, given simultaneous global demographic changes and economic concerns, this study provides new knowledge regarding the factors that push and pull retirees to participate in the labor market.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged workers' preferences to enter different retirement employment options within the contingent and the flexible work arrangements (FWA) types of bridge employment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study was collected in 2008 using a questionnaire with 31 items. A total of 144 mature aged workers from multiple firms, aged 50 years and over, working full‐time, in the construction industry participated in the study. The collected data was analysed using correlation and regression analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that the study variables have positive and negative influences on pre‐retirees' preference for the retirement employment options within the contingent and the FWA bridge employment. It was also found that while income failed to moderate, social retirement anxieties did significantly moderate the relationship between perceived financial preparedness and the different employment options within the contingent bridge employment.

Practical implications

This study clearly provides practitioners and career counsellors a new insight that the work and non‐work predictors for the retirement employment options within each of the contingent and the FWA bridge employments vary between factors of perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties and level of income.

Originality/value

In contradiction to the existing literature that “comfortable” social retirement adjustment as a determinant for bridge employment, this study's findings revealed that if pre‐retirees perceive that they are not adequately financially prepared for retirement, they would opt for bridge employment irrespective of levels of social retirement anxieties.

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