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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Xi-Ning Li, Xiao-Gang Dang, Bao-Qiang Xie and Yu-Long Hu

– The purpose of this paper is to develop digital flexible pre-assembly tooling system for fuselage panels.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop digital flexible pre-assembly tooling system for fuselage panels.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper analyzes the technological characteristics of fuselage panels and then determines the pre-assembly object. Second, the pre-assembly positioning method and assembly process are researched. Third, the panel components pre-assembly flexible tooling scheme is constructed. Finally, the pre-assembly flexible tooling system is designed and manufactured.

Findings

This study shows the novel solution results in significantly smaller tooling dimensions, while providing greater stability. Digital flexible assembly is an effective way to reduce floor space, reduce delivery and production lead times and improve quality.

Practical implications

The tooling designed in this case is actually used in industrial application. The flexible tooling can realize the pre-assembly for a number of fuselage panels, which is shown as an example in this paper.

Originality/value

The paper suggests the fuselage panel pre-assembly process based on the thought including pre-assembly, the automatic drilling and riveting and jointing, and constructs a flexible tooling system for aircraft fuselage panel component pre-assembly.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Margareta Oudhuis

The Volvo Bus Plant at Borås, Sweden, is one of the largest bus‐chassis assembly plants in the world. Some years ago a new organization model, FLiSa, was implemented as an…

Abstract

The Volvo Bus Plant at Borås, Sweden, is one of the largest bus‐chassis assembly plants in the world. Some years ago a new organization model, FLiSa, was implemented as an attempt to construct well‐functioning teams consisting of multi‐functional individuals, eager to learn, be flexible and to take on more responsibilities. Moreover, the FLiSa‐model with its line‐organization, was expected to bring about higher levels of productivity and quality. However, by the end of 2003 it is evident that the FLiSa‐model is facing serious problems as regards expected results. What factors contributed to this outcome? In this paper the author argues that imbalances or different competitive socio‐technical aspects inherent in the FLiSa‐model have been decisive. Moreover, the author suggests that difficulties to find productive solutions to these imbalances have – as an unintended consequence – brought about what she defines as “the individualised team”.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Xianliang Zhang, Weibing Zhu, Xiande Wu, Ting Song, Yaen Xie and Han Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to propose a pre-defined performance robust control method for pre-assembly configuration establishment of in-space assembly missions, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a pre-defined performance robust control method for pre-assembly configuration establishment of in-space assembly missions, and collision avoidance is considered during the configuration establishment process.

Design/methodology/approach

First, six-degrees-of-freedom error kinematic and dynamic models of relative translational and rotational motion between transportation systems are developed. Second, the prescribed transient-state performance bounds of tracking errors are designed. In addition, based on the backstepping, combining the pre-defined performance control method with a robust control method, a pre-defined performance robust controller is designed.

Findings

By designing prescribed transient-state performance bounds of tracking errors to guarantee that there is no overshoot, collision-avoidance can be achieved. Combining the pre-defined performance control method with a robust control method, robustness to disturbance is guaranteed.

Originality/value

This paper proposed a pre-defined performance robust control method. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed controller can achieve a pre-assembly configuration establishment with collision avoidance in the existence of external disturbances.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Ruqin Ren, Bei Yan and Lian Jian

The purpose of this paper is to examine how communication practices influence individuals’ team assembly and performance in open innovation contests.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how communication practices influence individuals’ team assembly and performance in open innovation contests.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed behavioral trace data of 4,651 teams and 19,317 participants from a leading open innovation platform, Kaggle. The analyses applied weighted least squares regression and weighted mediation analysis.

Findings

Sharing online profiles positively relates to a person’s performance and likelihood of becoming a leader in open innovation teams. Team assembly effectiveness (one’s ability to team up with high-performing teammates) mediates the relationship between online profile sharing and performance. Moreover, sharing personal websites has a stronger positive effect on performance and likelihood of becoming a team leader, compared to sharing links to professional social networking sites (e.g. LinkedIn).

Research limitations/implications

As team collaboration becomes increasingly common in open innovation, participants’ sharing of their online profiles becomes an important variable predicting their success. This study extends prior research on virtual team collaboration by highlighting the role of communication practices that occur in the team pre-assembly stage, as an antecedent of team assembly. It also addresses a long-standing debate about the credibility of information online by showing that a narrative-based online profile format (e.g. a personal website) can be more powerful than a standardized format (e.g. LinkedIn).

Practical implications

Open innovation organizers should encourage online profile sharing among participants to facilitate effective team assembly in order to improve innovation outcomes.

Originality/value

The current study highlights the importance of team assembly in open innovation, especially the role of sharing online profiles in this process. It connects two areas of research that are previously distant, one on team assembly and one on online profile sharing. It also adds new empirical evidence to the discussion about online information credibility.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

W. Eversheim, P. Kettner and K.P. Mertz

Construction of devices is not the most important element of flexible assembly systems; the true value lies in the realisation of systematic and need‐oriented planning.

Abstract

Construction of devices is not the most important element of flexible assembly systems; the true value lies in the realisation of systematic and need‐oriented planning.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Anna Azzi, Daria Battini, Maurizio Faccio and Alessandro Persona

The purpose of this paper is to apply group assembly (GA) considerations to the construction industry and to provide evidence of construction sector industrialization with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply group assembly (GA) considerations to the construction industry and to provide evidence of construction sector industrialization with quantitative results. Moreover, a flexible assembly system is proposed, especially designed to cope with variability: this can be easily extendable to other industrial sectors, especially when dealing with extremely variable environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study conducted at an Italian company leader in the design, manufacture and installation of architectural claddings and lightweight continuous facades.

Findings

The research empirically demonstrates how the application of GA and the creation of project families lead to consistent enhancement also within the construction industry. The case study reveals great improvement in terms of both operating and ergonomic performances, agile assembly system reconfiguration design and make span reduction. The possibility of correlating a new project to an identified family gives the opportunity to understand the best assembly line layout configuration which should be assigned to the project, to improve the throughput time and the controllability of the assembly process and to guarantee efficient floor space utilization, lead‐time control, accuracy and reliability.

Originality/value

The novelty of the study lies in the way the assembly layout is designed to cope with variability: the assembly line, which is dedicated to more stable processes, is coupled with pre‐assembly stations, easily reconfigurable, meant to be “variability absorbers”. As far as the authors know, this is also the first time GA is applied to the construction industry. Moreover, a timely topic such as construction sector industrialization is confirmed by quantitative results.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

María J. Paz and María E. Ruiz Gálvez

This paper analyzes the effects on local suppliers of the adoption of a modular platform, taking into account different supply-chain relations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes the effects on local suppliers of the adoption of a modular platform, taking into account different supply-chain relations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ research follows an interpretive case study methodology based on a theoretical approach that seeks to validate the approach while making conclusions about the case study.

Findings

The traditional pyramidal structure of automotive supply chains has been altered by the consolidation of a much more complex structure, mostly in spatial and geographical terms. The authors find a strong hierarchy resulting from the reinforced market power of the carmaker under study and the respective fragile structural positioning of logistics companies and pre-assemblers. The increased versatility of the assembly plant, considered a consequence of its transition to modular platforms, finds a counterpart in the necessary re-configuration of certain supply relationships.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is to connect the defining elements of supply-chain relations with those technical and organizational changes associated with the transition to modular platforms, as well as to analyze changes in the pyramidal structure of the supply chain, from both a spatial and relational perspective.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

P.M Pelagagge, G. Cardarelli and M. Palumbo

This article presents a study on assembly automation in small subcontracting enterprises. In this scenario the evaluated production volumes of each product limit the…

Abstract

This article presents a study on assembly automation in small subcontracting enterprises. In this scenario the evaluated production volumes of each product limit the competitiveness of flexible assembly systems. At the same time the uncertainty of the economic life of the product causes high risk factors in the use of assembly transfer lines. The proposed solution is characterized by the employment of an asynchronous line with single‐purpose automatic stations and manual stations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Alex Opoku and Sarah A. Mills

As part of the UK Government’s strategy to address the current shortage of primary school places is the construction of standardised designed schools. The UK Government…

Abstract

Purpose

As part of the UK Government’s strategy to address the current shortage of primary school places is the construction of standardised designed schools. The UK Government has been facing an uphill battle to meet the demand for the ever-increasing number of school places it requires. This paper aims to explore the use of standardised school design in addressing the problem of primary school places in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the exploratory nature of this investigation, a pragmatic research philosophy is utilised and mixed-method data collection techniques are used. Quantitative data collection is in the form of a survey involving 306 construction professionals and stakeholders; this has been consolidated using qualitative data collection in the form of nine purposefully selected semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The research highlighted the influence that people and their perceptions have on the successful implementation of standardisation. The results show that a high level of misunderstanding exists around the concept of standardisation and its definition. Standardised design has shown to have a remarkable influence in reducing the cost and time required for delivering the construction of new schools.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the exploratory nature of this research, the results obtained have not been wholly conclusive but have instead provided a contribution to the area of standardisation in construction.

Originality/value

The research has uncovered that, to truly promote and drive standardisation in the delivery of schools, a joint approach is required with designers, contractors, clients and manufacturers, working in partnership to develop successful solutions. The paper will, therefore, help the key stakeholders delivering standardised schools in UK to fully understand the concept and turn the challenges into opportunities.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Peter Fredriksson

To identify operations and logistics issues which are critical for the operational performance in modular assembly processes.

Abstract

Purpose

To identify operations and logistics issues which are critical for the operational performance in modular assembly processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on case studies of Volvo Cars, Toyota, and Saab, the paper identifies operations and logistics issues that are critical for the operational performance of modular assembly processes. The issues are used for extending our understanding of the design and operation of modular assembly processes.

Findings

The issues identified concern production planning, deviation handling, assembly flow balance, small unit disadvantages, and module flow control. They reveal that a modular assembly process design brings structural disadvantages related to the dispersion of activities and resource needs. The issues also demonstrate the need for extensive coordination across the interfaces of the decoupled parts of the process.

Research limitations/implications

The findings will mainly be relevant for firms that design and produce complex products involving several technologies and that use company‐specific modules as is the case in the automotive industry, for instance.

Practical implications

Operations and logistics managers may use the findings in order to design and operate modular assembly processes, provide input to the design of modular products, analyze operations and logistics issues before the firm decides to go modular, or not.

Originality/value

Complements existing research on modular assembly processes by outlining structural disadvantages and explaining the need for extensive coordination in such processes.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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