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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Ebru Zeynep Mugaloglu and Zerrin Doganca

This study aims to enable preservice teachers to cooperate with teachers and to participate in solving classroom problems with the guidance of academic staff in an action…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enable preservice teachers to cooperate with teachers and to participate in solving classroom problems with the guidance of academic staff in an action research (AR) project.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight preservice teachers took an AR course and simultaneously participated in a collaborative AR project. While learning about the steps and nature of AR, preservice teachers worked with teachers and designed their own project proposals in order to solve classroom problems. A questionnaire about “doing” an AR and reports prepared by the preservice teachers were used as instruments.

Findings

Preservice teachers worked on different classroom problems together with the teachers and seven out of eight ARs were presented at a national teachers' conference. Moreover, all the preservice teachers reported that they were eager to apply AR in their future classrooms and they decided to apply their AR proposals even though the course had finished.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the participants and the instruments used here.

Practical implications

AR courses enable preservice teachers to take an active role in authentic workplaces, thereby encouraging them towards workplace learning.

Originality/value

The study shows that collaborative AR can enable preservice teachers to identify and solve classroom problems, thereby providing them with an environment in which to use their theoretical knowledge gained at university. Hence, AR courses could be integrated into teacher training programs in order to fulfil the missing link between theory and practice in teacher training.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Maria Eliophotou Menon

Compares the views of preservice and in‐service elementary school teachers regarding the effectiveness of school leaders in Cyprus. Data were collected from 66 in‐service

Abstract

Compares the views of preservice and in‐service elementary school teachers regarding the effectiveness of school leaders in Cyprus. Data were collected from 66 in‐service teachers, and 79 preservice teachers enrolled at the University of Cyprus. The findings indicate that in‐service teachers were significantly more positive than preservice teachers in their assessment of school principals. The former considered the weaknesses associated with principals to be mainly the result of the limitations of the educational system in Cyprus, whereas the latter expected their future superiors to be ineffective in their management of interpersonal relationships. The paper points to the need for better training and preparation of both school leaders and teachers before their appointments.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2017

David C. Young and Andrew Foran

Teaching professional literacy is a difficult endeavor, yet it is extremely important that educators are equipped with the required knowledge, skills, and attributes…

Abstract

Teaching professional literacy is a difficult endeavor, yet it is extremely important that educators are equipped with the required knowledge, skills, and attributes necessary to be engaged and responsible members of the profession. This chapter addresses the combined efforts of a university faculty of education working in concert with a provincial teacher union and school boards to assist pre-service teacher candidates in developing their own sense of professional identity. It will be demonstrated that this partnership assisted students in conceptualizing a professional identity by solidifying their understanding of ethical, legal, and organizational issues commonly associated with the teaching profession.

Details

University Partnerships for Pre-Service and Teacher Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-265-7

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Shane Lavery, Anne Coffey and Sandro Sandri

This chapter explores the value of a service-learning unit within a pre-service secondary teaching course. It does so through the perceptions of pre-service teachers. The…

Abstract

This chapter explores the value of a service-learning unit within a pre-service secondary teaching course. It does so through the perceptions of pre-service teachers. The purpose was to determine the potential of a service-learning program to prepare pre-service secondary teachers for the classroom, both personally and professionally. The context for the research is a social justice service-learning unit offered to pre-service secondary teachers undertaking a Bachelor of Education, Master of Teaching or Graduate Diploma of Education. There were 105 participants in the study. Data collection entailed a 25- to 30-minute survey, which participants completed at the conclusion of the unit. The survey contained qualitative and quantitative questions. Data were analysed through content analysis in the case of the open-ended questions while percentages and frequency column graphs were used for the multiple response questions. The results revealed that the personal and professional development of pre-service secondary teachers had been impacted significantly as a result of engagement in service-learning activities. Additionally, participants listed a range of ‘memorable’ experiences, highlighted various challenges associated with service-learning, indicated ways service-learning prepared them for their teaching practicum, and noted the importance of including service-learning as part of a teaching degree. An over-arching theme that emerged repeatedly in the comments of the pre-service teachers was the need to adopt an inclusive attitude in their teaching practice. The chapter concludes with the authors offering recommendations that focus on further research into the viability of service-learning programs in pre-service teaching courses.

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Glenda Cain

Many opportunities for a service-learning experience are available to education pre-service teachers at the University of Notre Dame Australia, and the Whale of a Tale

Abstract

Many opportunities for a service-learning experience are available to education pre-service teachers at the University of Notre Dame Australia, and the Whale of a Tale Reader Mentor Program is one of these. The Whale of a Tale developed as a service-learning experience as a result of a partnership between the University of Notre Dame Australia School of Education (UNDA) and the Western Australian Department for Child Protection and Family Support (DCPFS). The programme aimed to address some of the needs of children in out-of-home care (referred to as ‘children in care’) who have experienced trauma. This chapter initially describes how the Whale of a Tale Reader Mentor Program came into being. This description is followed by the rationale for basing the structure of the reading programme on a service-learning pedagogy. The results of a subsequent research study that evaluated the reading programme are then presented. Finally, the chapter discusses the concept of inclusion and how the Whale of a Tale Reader Mentor Program has facilitated a designated outreach approach to children on the margins. In particular, the programme focused on how these children could engage with reading stories that would hopefully inspire a lifelong love of reading and learning.

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Jenna Gillett-Swan and Deanna Grant-Smith

University-affiliated mentors serve as liaisons between schools and pre-service teachers during practicum placements, offering academic, administrative and relational…

Abstract

Purpose

University-affiliated mentors serve as liaisons between schools and pre-service teachers during practicum placements, offering academic, administrative and relational support. In the context of academic workload intensification, increasing student numbers and the need to respond to issues as they occur in time-pressured environments, the wellbeing of mentors can become compromised. Mentor wellbeing is explored, highlighting corollary impacts of threats to pre-service teacher wellbeing on those who support them.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive single case-study explored mentor lived experiences of wellbeing during the pre-service teacher practicum placement and mentoring process. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with mentors supervising pre-service teacher professional experience placements. Adopting a shadowed data approach, mentors shared their own experiences and reflected on the experiences of others. Data was analysed using thematic content analysis.

Findings

Mentor and pre-service teacher wellbeing experiences exhibited similar wellbeing indicators, including personal and professional stress, workload strains and ethical dilemmas. Many mentors felt invisible in terms of supports for their own self-care as the focus was on meeting practicum stakeholder and student support needs rather than their own wellbeing.

Originality/value

Changes to professional experience practices must consider potential impacts on pre-service teachers, in-school supervisors and the university-affiliated mentors as the wellbeing of each is potentially impacted the wellbeing of others in this professional experience triad. Increasing emphasis on work-integrated learning experiences across multiple disciplines invites future comparison and contrast of wellbeing experiences.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Glenn Rideout and Larry Morton

The puposes of this study is to examine the impact of primarily bureaucratic socialization; and demographic, experiential, and philosophical orientations (beliefs about…

Abstract

Purpose

The puposes of this study is to examine the impact of primarily bureaucratic socialization; and demographic, experiential, and philosophical orientations (beliefs about key educational concepts) variables on teacher candidates' pupil control ideology (PCI) during a preservice teacher education program. The relationship between philosophical orientations and changes to PCI is of particular interest.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected at the beginning and end of their teacher education program from 474 teacher candidates were analysed using multivariate analyses.

Findings

Practicum socialization experiences were more closely associated with participants' PCI at the end of the teacher education program than any of the demographic, experiential, or philosophical orientation variables.

Research limitations/implications

An examination of interaction effects among the variables revealed a limited number of situations where the interaction of particular beliefs, demographic, and experience variables appear to minimize the shift to a more custodial PCI. Specific implications are identified in relation to males and elementary teaching, urban practicum placements, and preservice teacher education curriculum units pertaining to authenticity of beginning teacher practices.

Originality/value

The study provides a framework within which educators may examine the authenticity of beginning teachers' practice. In particular, educators may wish to carefully consider the evidence suggesting that preservice teachers practice may be inauthentic, that is, primarily imitative as a result of custodializing socialization factors, but only in particular circumstances associated with their predominantly humanistic beliefs about education.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Amani K. Hamdan

Recently, various policies have been implemented in Saudi Arabia to reform science teaching at K-12 levels in order to focus on critical thinking, inquiry-based learning…

Abstract

Recently, various policies have been implemented in Saudi Arabia to reform science teaching at K-12 levels in order to focus on critical thinking, inquiry-based learning, and problem solving. Research is needed to explore the adequacy of teacher preparation programs to determine whether these programs sufficiently prepare Saudi science teachers to teach according to these new reforms. This study explores the challenges that Saudi pre-service science teachers face in these higher education programs. Results indicated that graduates of the programs studied were satisfied with their experiences; however, various concerns were expressed by some pre-service teachers regarding the theory-practice gap between their university coursework and field experiences, and the supervision structures and functions in place for the professional experiences component. Modifications to the teacher preparation programs are suggested in order to address these concerns and to successfully enact reforms in science education in Saudi Arabia.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Hui‐Yin Hsu

Although teacher educators have worked on improving preservice teachers' diversity awareness, researchers still face the challenge of pursuing a better approach to…

Abstract

Purpose

Although teacher educators have worked on improving preservice teachers' diversity awareness, researchers still face the challenge of pursuing a better approach to achieve the goal. In an era when educators are calling for evidence‐based practice, the purpose of this paper is to explore various ways in which both teacher‐education programs and general schools can integrate diversity issues into literacy teaching and learning. The paper undertakes this exploration on the basis of Gollnick and Chinn's cultural‐identity model and of weblog‐technology use.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants of this paper are 27 preservice teachers. The researchers set up a private group blog and invited all participants to be blog authors. The blog enabled the instructor to archive and categorize all posts and to continue to invite cohorts of preservice teachers to join the blog. Preservice teachers are placed in culturally and linguistically diverse classroom settings and are required to post their weekly reflections on the weblog. The researchers adopte mixed methodology to collect both qualitative data (field observation reports, discussion content on the blog, case studies, and focus groups) and quantitative data (pre‐post surveys).

Findings

The preservice teachers in this paper possessed positive and open‐minded attitudes toward English language learners. According to the pre‐ and post‐survey, preservice teachers are confident that they could resolve issues related to diversity in the classroom after participating in the paper. According to the results of the case‐scenario analysis, the instructor should use reading contexts to address diversity issues, especially those pertaining to exceptionality, geography, class, and gender. The preservice teachers' discussions and interactions on the blog were rich. Preservice teachers felt motivation to expand their diversity‐themed discussions from the classroom to the blog.

Originality/value

With the assistance of weblogs, the instructor can extend the in‐class discussion. In the paper, group blogs became a tool that helped the instructor and the preservice teachers not only link the in‐class discussion to their field observations but also share personal experiences and resources. For introverted preservice teachers, a group blog can serve as a channel through which the preservice teachers can comfortably express carefully organized opinions. In general, the commenting feature of the blog enriches interaction among preservice teachers and widens their discussion in a way in which limited class time cannot.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Tricia Denise Delk

The purpose of this study is to explore how multicultural curriculum and instruction in a teacher-credentialing program prepared pre-service teachers to work with diverse students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how multicultural curriculum and instruction in a teacher-credentialing program prepared pre-service teachers to work with diverse students.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method used was a qualitative approach. The research design was a descriptive single embedded case study to interview pre-service teachers who were in their second semester in a teacher-credentialing program at a university on the west coast and pre-service teachers who were in their final semester in the same teacher-credentialing program. Pre-service teachers discussed their disappointment in the program for their lack of training in how to work with culturally diverse students.

Findings

The findings from the study will add to the body of knowledge specific to teacher-credentialing programs, curriculum developers and universal design for learning on K-12 education.

Research limitations/implications

As schools become more diverse, an important role of teacher-credentialing courses is to train future teachers with the knowledge to assist culturally diverse students. If teachers were multicultural teachers, they would be better prepared to instruct culturally diverse students and could acknowledge sociocultural resources and information that students bring to the classroom.

Originality/value

The study is essential because training teachers to instruct culturally diverse students is critical as student demographics become more diverse.

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