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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Kirsten A. Way, Nerina J. Jimmieson and Prashant Bordia

Groups’ perceptions of their supervisors’ conflict management styles (CMSs) can have important implications for well-being. Rather than being examined in isolation…

Abstract

Purpose

Groups’ perceptions of their supervisors’ conflict management styles (CMSs) can have important implications for well-being. Rather than being examined in isolation, supervisor CMSs need to be considered in the context of supervisors’ emotional ability and the amount of conflict in workgroups. This paper aims to investigate the three-way interactions between group-level perceptions of supervisor CMSs (collaborating, yielding, forcing), supervisor emotion recognition skills and group relationship conflict in predicting collective employee burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Group-level hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted with 972 teaching professionals nested in 109 groups.

Findings

The positive association between supervisor yielding climate and collective employee burnout was evident when supervisor emotion recognition was low but absent when supervisor emotion recognition was high. Groups with high supervisor forcing climate and high supervisor emotion recognition experienced lower group burnout, an effect evident at high but not low relationship conflict.

Practical implications

Supervisors have a critical – and challenging – role to play in managing conflict among group members. The detrimental effects of supervisor yielding and forcing climates on collective employee burnout are moderated by personal (supervisor emotion recognition) and situational (the level of relationship conflict) variables. These findings have practical implications for how supervisors could be trained to handle conflict.

Originality/value

This research challenges traditional notions that supervisor yielding and forcing CMSs are universally detrimental to well-being.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Liz Jones, Bernadette Watson, Elizabeth Hobman, Prashant Bordia, Cindy Gallois and Victor J. Callan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of organizational level on employees' perceptions and reactions to a complex organizational change involving proposed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of organizational level on employees' perceptions and reactions to a complex organizational change involving proposed work force redesign, downsizing and a physical move to a new hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included executives, supervisory and non‐supervisory staff in a major tertiary hospital. Recorded in‐depth interviews were conducted with 61 employees about the positive and negative aspects of the change.

Findings

A total of 12 themes were identified from content coding, including emotional responses and attitudes toward the change, issues about the management of the change process and about change outcomes. Supervisory and non‐supervisory staff referred more to conflict and divisions, and expressed more negative attitudes toward the change, than did executives. Executives and supervisory staff focused more on planning challenges and potential outcomes of the change than did non‐supervisory staff. Finally, compared to other staff, executives focused more on participation in the change process and communication about the change process.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the organizational change at only one time point in one organization. Perceptions of the change may change over time, and other identities like professional identity may influence perceptions.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that change agents should consider the needs of different organizational groups in order to achieve effective and successful organizational change.

Originality/value

This study clearly shows the impact of organizational level, identifying similarities and differences in perceptions of change across level.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Kirsten A. Way, Nerina L Jimmieson and Prashant Bordia

This study aims to investigate the extent to which employee outcomes (anxiety/depression, bullying and workers’ compensation claims thoughts) are affected by shared…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the extent to which employee outcomes (anxiety/depression, bullying and workers’ compensation claims thoughts) are affected by shared perceptions of supervisor conflict management style (CMS). Further, this study aims to assess cross-level moderating effects of supervisor CMS climate on the positive association between relationship conflict and these outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Multilevel modeling was conducted using a sample of 401 employees nested in 69 workgroups.

Findings

High collaborating, low yielding and low forcing climates (positive supervisor climates) were associated with lower anxiety/depression, bullying and claim thoughts. Unexpectedly, the direction of moderation showed that the positive association between relationship conflict and anxiety/depression and bullying was stronger for positive supervisor CMS climates than for negative supervisor CMS climates (low collaborating, high yielding and high forcing). Nevertheless, these interactions revealed that positive supervisor climates were the most effective at reducing anxiety/depression and bullying when relationship conflict was low. For claim thoughts, positive supervisor CMS climates had the predicted stress-buffering effects.

Research limitations/implications

Employees benefit from supervisors creating positive CMS climates when dealing with conflict as a third party, and intervening when conflict is low, when their intervention is more likely to minimize anxiety/depression and bullying.

Originality/value

By considering the unique perspective of employees’ shared perceptions of supervisor CMS, important implications for the span of influence of supervisor behavior on employee well-being have been indicated.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Kirsten A. Way, Nerina L. Jimmieson and Prashant Bordia

The purpose of this paper is to test a multilevel model of the main and mediating effects of supervisor conflict management style (SCMS) climate and procedural justice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a multilevel model of the main and mediating effects of supervisor conflict management style (SCMS) climate and procedural justice (PJ) climate on employee strain. It is hypothesized that workgroup-level climate induced by SCMS can fall into four types: collaborative climate, yielding climate, forcing climate, or avoiding climate; that these group-level perceptions will have differential effects on employee strain, and will be mediated by PJ climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Multilevel SEM was used to analyze data from 420 employees nested in 61 workgroups.

Findings

Workgroups that perceived high supervisor collaborating climate reported lower sleep disturbance, job dissatisfaction, and action-taking cognitions. Workgroups that perceived high supervisor yielding climate and high supervisor forcing climate reported higher anxiety/depression, sleep disturbance, job dissatisfaction, and action-taking cognitions. Results supported a PJ climate mediation model when supervisors’ behavior was reported to be collaborative and yielding.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research design places limitations on conclusions about causality; thus, longitudinal studies are recommended.

Practical implications

Supervisor behavior in response to conflict may have far-reaching effects beyond those who are a party to the conflict. The more visible use of supervisor collaborative CMS may be beneficial.

Social implications

The economic costs associated with workplace conflict may be reduced through the application of these findings.

Originality/value

By applying multilevel theory and analysis, we extend workplace conflict theory.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Vikas Goyal and Prashant Mishra

The purpose of this paper is to develop a nuanced framework for evaluating a channel partner’s performance in distribution channel relationships. Given a channel partner’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a nuanced framework for evaluating a channel partner’s performance in distribution channel relationships. Given a channel partner’s task environment characteristics (high/low munificence, dynamism and complexity), the study examines which performance metrics (output, activity or capability) are most relevant for evaluating its performance levels effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts self-administered cross-sectional survey-based research design. Matched data were collected from 252 channel partners – manager relationship dyads. The latent change score (LCS) model within SEM framework provides mean paired-differences of the relevance ratings for each metrics. This was used to assess the empirical validity of the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The study demonstrates the importance of calibrating performance evaluation metrics to a channel partner’s task environment state, made possible by its holistic approach to performance evaluation. Based on an extensive analysis, it shows that no single metric is relevant within all environmental states; rather, it could be dysfunctional, a result that differs from vast majority of the literature.

Research limitations/implications

Investigates individual linkages between task environment dimensions and performance metrics to provide a fuller understanding of these relationships. Also provides a theoretical framework to support further research on the topic.

Practical implications

The study provides managerial guidelines (and extensive graphical analysis) for nuanced and dynamic evaluation of channel partners’ performance that can enable firms to identify and promote their most valuable channel partners and prevent the deterioration of others.

Originality/value

First one to develop and empirically validate a nuanced framework for evaluating performance of exchange partners that operate under diverse task environment states.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Nor Shahriza Abdul Karim and Robert Heckman

This paper reports a study conducted longitudinally to investigate group communication media choice and the use of a web‐based learning tool, as well as other types of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports a study conducted longitudinally to investigate group communication media choice and the use of a web‐based learning tool, as well as other types of communication media, such as e‐mail, telephone, and face‐to‐face, for communication and collaboration to complete given tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was designed following the case study research methodology and design of Yin. Longitudinal observation was made on groups in their naturalistic research setting. Twenty‐three groups of four or five students working on five similar tasks were selected as the unit of analysis.

Findings

The findings showed that groups' choice‐making process of communication media evolved over a period of time. A pattern of group communication emerged, namely face‐to‐face, virtual, and mixed (the use of both face‐to‐face and virtual communication). The three group communication categories were significantly different in performance, with the mixed category performing the highest in terms of grade.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are related to the case study methodology and the subjectivity of some interpretations.

Practical implications

The findings should assist in the design of both on‐campus and distance learning course modules to facilitate learning through group project or assignment. The findings should also assist the design and implementation of the e‐learning systems and tools that are acceptable to users.

Originality/value

The study provides insight into how such ICT applications can be made useful and effective, and why, when given the freedom to choose, the use of a web‐based tool is the least attempted for communication.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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