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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Jaspreet Kaur, Vikas Kumar, Ankit Goyal, Beenu Tanwar, Yogesh Gat, Rasane Prasad and Sheenam Suri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the health effects and safety aspects regarding the consumption of energy drink (ED).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the health effects and safety aspects regarding the consumption of energy drink (ED).

Design/methodology/approach

A wide variety of publications was identified through electronic databases (ScienceDirect, PubMed, SciELO, Google Scholar, Link springer and ResearchGate) on the basis of different keyword such as composition, market status, consumption pattern, health effects, consequences and policies related to ED consumption.

Findings

Owing to its popularity, various brands of EDs have been introduced in the market along with a wide variety of modifications to attract the consumers of all age groups. EDs comprise majorly active ingredients such as caffeine, taurine, guarana, L-carnitine and glucoronolactone, ginseng and sweeteners. EDs are well known to have good taste, enhance energy levels, physical alertness and performance, but they also pose risk of certain health hazards, i.e. caffeine intoxication. Because of this, different policies have been formulated by various regulatory bodies of respective countries regarding the composition, labelling, distribution and sale of EDs.

Originality/value

This review will provide a brief overview of composition, market status, consumption pattern, health effects, consequences and policies related to ED consumption.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Sawinder Kaur, Paramjit S. Panesar, Sushma Gurumayum, Prasad Rasane and Vikas Kumar

The extraction of bioactive compounds such as pigments from natural sources, using different solvents, is a vital downstream process. The present study aims to investigate the…

150

Abstract

Purpose

The extraction of bioactive compounds such as pigments from natural sources, using different solvents, is a vital downstream process. The present study aims to investigate the effect of different variables, namely, extraction temperature, mass of fermented rice and time on the extraction process of orevactaene and flavanoid pigment from Epicoccum nigrum fermented broken rice.

Design/methodology/approach

Central composite rotatable design under response surface methodology was used for deducing optimized conditions. The pigments were extracted under conditions of extraction temperature (40-70°C), mass of fermented rice (0.5-1.5 g) and time (30-90 min), using water as the extraction media. The experimental data obtained were studied by analysis of variance. Data were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The optimum conditions generated by the software for aqueous extraction process, i.e. extraction temperature of 55.7°C, 0.79 g of fermented matter and extraction time of 56.6 min, resulted in a pigment yield of 52.7AU/g orevactaene and 77.2 AU/g flavanoid.

Research limitations/implications

The developed polynomial empirical model for the optimal recovery of the orevactaene and flavanoid pigments could be used for further studies in prediction of yield under specified variable conditions.

Practical implications

The response surface methodology helped in optimizng the conditions for the eco-friendly low-cost aqueous extarction process for orevactaene and flavanoid pigments, produced by Epicoccum nigrum during solid state fermentation of broken rice. This optimization can provide the basis for scaling up for industrial extraction process.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on optimizing the extraction conditions to get the maximum yield of orevactaene and flavanoid pigments, using water as the extracting media. No literature is available on the optimization of the extraction process of Epicoccum nigrum pigments, to the best of the authors’ knowledge.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2022

Simran Gogna, Jaspreet Kaur, Kartik Sharma, Vishesh Bhadariya, Jyoti Singh, Vikas Kumar, Prasad Rasane and Vipasha Vipasha

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the health benefits, functional role of alpha linolenic acid (ALA) in combating diet-related non-communicable diseases, absorption…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the health benefits, functional role of alpha linolenic acid (ALA) in combating diet-related non-communicable diseases, absorption, metabolism, toxicity and extraction of ALA.

Design/methodology/approach

A wide range of publications were identified through electronic databases (Google Scholar, PubMed, SciELO, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and ResearchGate) on the basis of different keywords such as dietary sources, functional role, metabolism, beneficial effects, toxicity and extraction.

Findings

ALA, an omega-3 fatty acid, is commonly found in dietary sources such as flaxseeds, rapeseed, pumpkin seeds, walnuts and fatty fish, with flaxseed being the richest among all the sources. Several convincing evidences depict the functional role of ALA in ameliorating cardiovascular functions, regulating systolic and diastolic blood pressure and improving neurological disorders, thus possessing anti-arrhythmic as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Its promising effect is also noticed on post-menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, insomnia and headache as well as in balancing the levels of sex hormones in women suffering from PCOS. Furthermore, it was also responsible for reducing the concentrations of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Its excess consumption may lead to gastrointestinal disturbances such as flatulence and bloating. Various extraction techniques, namely, medium pressure liquid chromatography, silver silica gel chromatography, silver ion-solid phase extraction and silver ion-high pressure liquid chromatography are used for the extraction of ALA from its sources.

Originality/value

This is a novel review which will provide a brief overview of dietary sources, functional role, absorption and metabolism, health benefits, toxicity and extraction of ALA.

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Sawinder Kaur, Vivek Mumbarkar, Paramjit S. Panesar, Sushma Gurumayum and Prasad Rasane

The purpose of this study is to isolate yellow pigment producing fungal strain and to determine the media requirement for growth and secondary metabolite production.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to isolate yellow pigment producing fungal strain and to determine the media requirement for growth and secondary metabolite production.

Design/methodology/approach

Fifteen soil samples were collected and studied for a pigment producing fungal sources. Selection of a fungus was based on pigment produced and further conditions, such as effect of media composition and light wavelength on pigment production and growth parameters were optimised.

Findings

Out of the isolates analysed, Epicoccum nigrum was selected for further study as this strain has the potential for pigment production. Among all the media evaluated, potato dextrose agar (PDA) was found to be the best media for growth and sporulation, whilst sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) was only 29 per cent as capable as the best medium. The radial growth rate in case of PDA was 3 ± 0.02 mm/day, while in case of SDA, it was only 1.09 mm/day. Whilst starch as a carbon source was found to increase the radial growth to 5.15 ± 0.02 mm/day, sucrose significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the sporulation (224,000 ± 1,550 spores/ml) of Epicoccum nigrum. Amongst the various nitrogen sources analysed, peptone significantly increased (p < 0.05) the radial growth (6.55 ± 0.02 mm/day) as well as sporulation (220,000 ± 2,100 spores/ml). The observations also indicated that E. nigrum is able to sense and differentiate between light in different wavelength ranges and respond differently in growth and sporulation. The light passing through a red colour sheet resulted in better radial growth (8.5 ± 0.02 mm/day) in comparison to unfiltered light (3 ± 0.02 mm/day). Yellow pigment production in terms of hue values was significantly influenced by the presence of dextrose, peptone and darkness.

Research limitations/implications

The isolated strain could be studied for variable conditions and stress factors for optimal production of the pigment. Recovery and purification studies could be carried out at pilot and industrial scale.

Practical implications

The isolation of a strain producing valuable microbial pigment will increase the alternatives of natural food colours and enhance the its commercial applications

Originality/value

This study identifies Epicoccum nigrum as a potential source of microbial pigment and facilitates its growth and production for possible applications in industrial pigment production.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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