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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Frank Wiengarten, Huashan Li, Prakash J. Singh and Brian Fynes

This paper aims to explore the performance implications of supply chain integration (SCI) taking a strategic perspective. Thus, this paper is set to provide answers to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the performance implications of supply chain integration (SCI) taking a strategic perspective. Thus, this paper is set to provide answers to the following research questions: Does a higher degree of SCI always lead to greater firm performance improvements? As the answer to this question is likely to be no, the authors explore the performance implications from a strategic perspective: Is the SCI–performance relationship contingent on a company’s competitive priorities (i.e. operations strategy)?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explore their questions through multiple quasi-independent data sets to test the impact of SCI on firm performance. Furthermore, the authors provide a more nuanced conceptual and empirical view to explore the previously uncovered contradictory results and contingent relationship challenging the “more integration equals higher firm performance” proposition.

Findings

The results only provide partial support for the proposition that more integration is always beneficial in the supply chain context. The authors also identified that the impact of SCI on financial performance is contingent on a company’s competitive priorities.

Originality/value

This study provides a much-needed comprehensive assessment of the SCI–performance relationship through critically re-evaluating one of the most popular propositions in the field of supply chain management. The results can be extrapolated beyond the dyad, as the authors conceptualise integration simultaneously from an upstream and downstream perspective.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Prakash J. Singh and Alan J.R. Smith

It is generally acknowledged that organisations need to be innovative in order to survive and prosper. Some advocates of total quality management (TQM) have suggested that…

Abstract

It is generally acknowledged that organisations need to be innovative in order to survive and prosper. Some advocates of total quality management (TQM) have suggested that it provides the necessary platform for inculcating innovation in organisations. Intuitively, TQM components involving sound and effective practices on leadership, customer focus, relations with suppliers, employee inter‐relationships, information/communication systems and management of processes and products do appear to enable organisations develop culture of innovation. A robust TQM‐innovation relationship appears to be conceptually plausible, but little empirical evidence has so far been offered to support this proposition. In this paper, this relationship is explored. Empirical data were taken from a survey of 418 Australian manufacturing organisations. Structural equation modelling technique was used for statistical analysis. Results show that there is insufficient statistical evidence to suggest that TQM is related to innovation. There could well be a more complex relationship between these concepts.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Prakash J. Singh and Damien Power

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a model of collaboration based on the notion of firms having strong working relationships with their suppliers and customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a model of collaboration based on the notion of firms having strong working relationships with their suppliers and customers. Whilst issues associated with collaborative relationships between firms and their trading partners are a key theme currently being addressed in the supply chain management literature, there appears to be a lack of clear guidelines as to how such capability can be developed in a practical sense.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 418 Australian manufacturing plants are used to test the model. Two key constructs, customer relationship and supplier involvement, are developed. For predictive validity purposes, these constructs are regressed against firm performance construct.

Findings

Results of structural equation modeling analysis show, inter alia, that there is some support for this collaboration model, with both collaboration‐based constructs influencing performance.

Originality/value

The results provide an insight into how firms can develop a level of collaboration capability.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Alka Ashwini Nand, Prakash J. Singh and Damien Power

The purpose of this paper is to test the integrated model of operations strategy as proposed by Schmenner and Swink to explain whether firms trade‐off or accumulate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the integrated model of operations strategy as proposed by Schmenner and Swink to explain whether firms trade‐off or accumulate capabilities, taking into account their positions relative to their asset and operating frontiers.

Design/methodology/approach

The four major airlines based in Australia were studied. The paper is based on longitudinal data obtained from secondary sources. The four operations capabilities cost, quality, delivery and flexibility, and asset and operating frontiers, were all measured with proxy variables.

Findings

The study provides some support for the integrated model. Firms do appear to trade‐off capabilities when their asset and operating frontiers are close to each other. Firms show signs of accumulation when the asset frontiers are expanding significantly over time. There is indirect evidence that firms could be accumulating capabilities when the gap between the two frontiers is large.

Practical implications

The study provides insights into when firms trade‐off or accumulate capabilities. A good understanding of asset and operating frontiers is important in this regard. Managers need to better identify, establish and combine their firms' capabilities in response to varying internal and external contingencies.

Originality/value

The paper provides an original and detailed empirical validation of Schmenner and Swink's integrated model. In doing so, this study contributes to informing and clarifying the debate in the operations strategy area relating to the circumstances in which firms trade‐off and/or accumulate capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Prakash J. Singh and Peter Mansour‐Nahra

Public sector organisations have been relatively late in adopting ISO 9000 quality management standards in comparison with those from the private sector. While the…

Abstract

Purpose

Public sector organisations have been relatively late in adopting ISO 9000 quality management standards in comparison with those from the private sector. While the standards have the potential to provide many benefits, they could also reinforce certain detrimental orthodoxies. How suitable ISO 9000 is to public sector organisations is not clear. This paper aims to assess the suitability of ISO 9000 through the experiences of a public sector organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The organisation is a prominent Australian federal government agency operating in the maritime safety area. The experiences of this organisation were captured through interviews with key personnel and publicly available data. Specific issues analysed included the motivation for implementation, the registration process involved, the difficulties faced and the benefits derived.

Findings

Overall, it is clear that ISO 9000 has been a success in this organisation. It had the “right” attitude in terms of its motivation for implementation, used a pragmatic approach to the registration process, took practical steps to minimise problems and had realised meaningful benefits.

Originality/value

Results suggest that the approach taken by this organisation can be exemplary to other similar organisations. The paper supports the contingent view of ISO 9000 where organisations need to customise the standards to their requirements. Finally, this paper provides empirical insights into the diffusion of a significant management phenomenon in a sector that does not appear to have had much experience with it.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Kevin Burgess and Prakash J. Singh

Organisations need to have a profound level of understanding of their supply chains if they are to successfully find sources of competitive advantage within them. Current…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations need to have a profound level of understanding of their supply chains if they are to successfully find sources of competitive advantage within them. Current methodologies for analysing supply chains, such as the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model, are not sufficiently comprehensive, particularly when it comes to understanding the complex social and political factors that are an integral part of any supply chain. This paper aims to use a case study of a supply chain from the public utility industry sector in Australia to develop an integrated framework for analysing supply chains within a multi‐disciplinary and multi‐method research paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study supply chain was mapped with the SCOR modelling tool which provided insights into the physical characteristics and value points along the supply chain.

Findings

Analysis of the SCOR model map also helped identify 31 key “actors” in the chain, who were then interviewed in depth. These interviews provided insights into the social and political factors which determined the supply chain performance.

Originality/value

The outcome of this study is a framework that provides two primary benefits. First, it shows the relationships between relevant variables from different disciplines (i.e. corporate governance, infrastructure, operations knowledge, social climate and innovation), and how they impact on performance. Second, the framework provides a way forward in synthesising multi‐disciplinary and multi‐method research into a coherent whole.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Prakash J. Singh and Alan Smith

To develop a quality management (QM) measurement instrument that has sound psychometric properties and recognizes a key feature of the field, i.e. QM is currently…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a quality management (QM) measurement instrument that has sound psychometric properties and recognizes a key feature of the field, i.e. QM is currently characterized by three competing approaches: standards‐based; prize‐criteria; and, elemental implementation approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The three disparate approaches were analyzed to identify sets of key constructs and associated items. The assembled instrument was empirically validated through a survey of 418 Australian manufacturing organizations. A full set of reliability and validity tests were performed. Wherever applicable, confirmatory approach using structural equation modeling was used.

Findings

The results of psychometric tests suggest that the constructs of the three approaches have good empirical support. In the manner in which the instrument is presented, it is possible to separately measure constructs related to each of the three approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The measurement instrument has been validated with manufacturing organizations from Australia. It is applicability to other industry sectors or country contexts needs to be verified.

Practical implications

Practitioners and consultants can use the measurement instrument for conducting QM benchmarking exercises within and across organizations. Researchers can use the instrument in future studies for, inter alia, theory development in the area.

Originality/value

The measurement instrument overcomes the shortcomings of the existing instruments by explicitly including all three practical approaches to quality management. Also, a rigorous psychometric validation process is adopted that provides credible outcomes.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Boaz Bernstein and Prakash J. Singh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the social and behavioral actions, activities and practices in order to group them together to create behavior‐based profiles that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the social and behavioral actions, activities and practices in order to group them together to create behavior‐based profiles that characterize the various stages of the innovation generation processes within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from nine Australian companies from the biotechnology sector. Using the grounded theory approach to data analysis, labels from Rogers' adopter categorization model were used to broadly identify and classify typical actions, activities, practices and behaviors exhibited within organizations that can be described as being “innovator”, “early adopter”, “early majority”, “late majority” or “laggard” types. Further, Moore's metaphor of “chasm” was applied to explore the nature of difficulties that organizations face in converting innovative ideas into commercially successful products and services.

Findings

The use of the labels from the categories of the adopter categorization model enabled suitable behavior‐based profiles to be developed.

Originality/value

The use of the adopter categorization model provides a fuller and richer insight into the innovation generation process. The model can also be used to assess more holistically the viability of innovations as they progress from inception to commercialization.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Damien Power, Victoria Hanna, Prakash J. Singh and Danny Samson

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of the use of electronic markets (e‐markets), access to online data and trading partner collaboration on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of the use of electronic markets (e‐markets), access to online data and trading partner collaboration on operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved survey data from 233 Australian firms. Data were provided by members of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply Australia, who reflected upon relevant practices and performances of their firms. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results show that whilst all three direct effects are non‐significant, when the indirect effects are taken into account, the total effects are significant in strength. This suggests that use of e‐markets, access to online data and collaboration with trading partners, when taken in isolation, are not as effective as could be expected. However, when these factors are implemented together, their value and impact becomes significant.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to Australian firms.

Practical implications

The results highlight that investments in information and communication technology must be deployed in an holistic manner, for example, by combining use of web‐based applications and market mechanisms with effective data sharing and collaboration, if they are to produce significant improvements in operations.

Originality/value

While e‐markets may have been viewed as a mechanism for reducing the costs of inputs and/or as a new demand channel, this study establishes that more value can be extracted when this technology is viewed and exploited in a more strategic manner. E‐markets should be used in concert with access to data and collaboration with trading partners who are able to exploit the opportunities for mutual benefit.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Prakash J. Singh, Mei Feng and Alan Smith

While manufacturing organisations were early adopters of ISO 9000, lately, many service sector organisations have also pursued adoption. The aim of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

While manufacturing organisations were early adopters of ISO 9000, lately, many service sector organisations have also pursued adoption. The aim of this paper is to compare the experiences with the standard of the two sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The research collected data from 149 service and 160 manufacturing organisations using a common survey measurement instrument.

Findings

Results show that there are no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of time and cost of obtaining registration. Also, there are only small points of differences in motivation for registration and difficulties faced. There are greater differences between the groups in terms of benefits gained and management practices associated with the standard.

Originality/value

These results provide interesting insights into how the two groups perceive and engage with the standard, how cross‐industry diffusion could be taking place, and the veracity of the claims made about the universal applicability of the standard. These findings imply that service organisations can learn from the experiences of the manufacturing sector, but copying carte blanche the implementation strategies is fraught with risks. Further, the standard is not universally applicable and may need industry‐specific tailoring.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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