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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Laura Davies

This paper explores service provision for young fathers through analysis of data from the three-year ESRC funded project Following Young Fathers. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores service provision for young fathers through analysis of data from the three-year ESRC funded project Following Young Fathers. The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea that young fathers are a “hard to reach” group. It begins with a discussion of literature and research evidence on this theme. The empirical discussion draws on data collected in interviews and focus groups with practitioners, service managers and those working to develop and deliver family support services.

Design/methodology/approach

The ESRC Following Young Fathers study used qualitative longitudinal methods to research the perspectives of fathers under the age of 25, mapping the availability of services to support them and investigating professional and policy responses to their needs. The strand reported on here focussed on the perspectives of a range of practitioners, service managers and those involved in developing and commissioning services.

Findings

The research findings, and those of other projects discussed in the paper, challenge the idea that young fathers are “hard to reach”, suggesting that we should, conversely, consider that many services are actually hard to access. Thus, increasing young fathers’ engagement requires better understanding of their often complex needs and a reshaping of service design and delivery to account for them. The paper highlights how the configuration, funding and delivery of services can inhibit young fathers’ use of them, and identifies ways in which they could be made more accessible.

Originality/value

The ESRC Following Young Fathers Study filled an important gap in knowledge about the lives of young fathers, developing understandings of their experiences and support needs. The strand reported on here draws on research with practitioners to provide an in-depth discussion of how services currently support young fathers, and how they could be better configured to address their often complex and diverse needs.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Jon Fieldhouse and Anne‐Laure Donskoy

This paper reports on action research which explored assertive outreach service users’ experiences of community participation and then fed this learning into a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on action research which explored assertive outreach service users’ experiences of community participation and then fed this learning into a multi‐agency forum – where it was used in joint‐planning between mental health services and community partners, aiming to maximise social inclusion locally.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research methodology was chosen to examine the forum's work because it brings together different perspectives to reveal an issue in its entirety and effect change in practice. Service users’ experiences were explored using semi‐structured qualitative interviews.

Findings

Engagement in mainstream community‐based activities re‐connected service users with cherished life roles and developed feelings of self‐efficacy, belonging, and wellbeing. Effective inter‐sectoral working in the forum was based on a shared agenda and collective action planning.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst every effort was made to ensure an authentic service user voice informed service development, it is unfortunate – in action research terms – that no service user interviewees were able to participate directly in the work of the forum. Community development work can build on micro‐level, person‐centred mental health care and extend outwards to collective community activity, aiming to harness social capital.

Practical implications

Assertive outreach – harnessing mainstream occupations through care‐planning – achieved outcomes that institutional rehab could not, and did so with a minimum of stigmatisation.

Social implications

This inquiry highlights that social inclusion is the responsibility of the community as a whole.

Originality/value

This inquiry appreciated service users as evaluators of the services they used and aimed to bring that knowledge to bear on service development.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

John Woolham, Paul Freddolino, Grant Gibson and Sarah Daniels

This paper aims to report on a structured attempt to develop new directions for research into telecare. Current research evidence suggests that telecare in the UK is not…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a structured attempt to develop new directions for research into telecare. Current research evidence suggests that telecare in the UK is not optimally cost-effective and does not deliver better outcomes than more traditional forms of care and support. To address this problem, an analysis of expert opinion about future directions for research is provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Two electronic surveys of UK based academic experts were conducted. Participants were drawn from a range of professional disciplines, including medicine, social care, occupational therapy and social policy and identified were by their contribution in this, or allied fields. The first survey included nine questions intended to identify at least one new research question that could form the basis of a funding proposal to the Nuffield Foundation, which provided “seedcorn” funding to support this work. Ten themes were identified following thematic analysis. The second survey asked participants to prioritise three of these themes.

Findings

Key themes emerging as priority areas for future research were as follows: the role of assessment in ensuring technology deployment meets the needs of service users; ethical implications of technology and how these might be addressed in the future; and the use of end user co-production/co-creation approaches in the development of new assistive technologies and digital enabled care.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on academic expert opinion; perspectives of practitioners, service users and family members are unrepresented.

Practical implications

The findings of this study could contribute to development of new directions for telecare research, and future strategic funding decisions in this rapidly changing field.

Originality/value

Evidence for sub-optimal outcomes for telecare requires new thinking. The authors are not aware of any other study that offers an analysis of expert opinion of fruitful areas for new research into telecare.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Keith Ford

The purpose of this paper is to provide a social construction of remission in relation to schizophrenia by the people affected most. The qualitative perspective utilised…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a social construction of remission in relation to schizophrenia by the people affected most. The qualitative perspective utilised is a contrast to the majority of papers around, which have been quantitative when addressing the concept of remission for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. This paper acknowledges and demonstrates evidence of listening to the stakeholder groups affected by the issues associated with remission and recovery, and delivers clarity around the phenomena of remission in relation to recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed, exploring participants’ interpretation of the concept of remission in schizophrenia. A purposive sample, of nine professionals, ten service users and seven carers, was recruited from two community mental health teams in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were employed to yield the data and all interview transcripts were analysed utilising “qualitative codes” thereby defining what is seen in the data. Diagramming and concept mapping was employed. Theoretical sensitivity was applied to demonstrate remission in abstract terms and to illustrate the openness, transparency and intention of the study.

Findings

The findings resulted in a conceptual map of the themes generated from the data. From this map four possible trajectories were developed, each highlighting a route which could be taken and the issues faced along the way. Positive and negative aspects of the trajectories offer discussion points for service users and practitioners alike to consider in their professional relationship. In addition a representation of the current interplay between recovery and remission is highlighted to offer clarity in relation to present service provision.

Research limitations/implications

The perspective and opinion from practitioners in Primary Care services was not proposed or included within this study. To gain an improved and realistic insight into this perspective a range of practitioners from primary care could provide valuable data for any future study as this would prove to be a valuable enhancement. This study offered a broad overview of professional groups with the ability to discuss mental health services, although it did not allow for a concentration from specific professional groups and therefore they were not able to fully represent their professional group.

Practical implications

This paper has illuminated the area of remission for people with schizophrenia and will therefore have practical implications in respect of on-going service development. In particular the interface between primary and secondary services which have struggled to employ consistent terminology serving only to confuse service users and service providers alike. The trajectories illustrated in this study offer clarity and understanding and direction for improved practice to facilitate recovery for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Shared understanding of concepts between service users and providers could be a large move in a positive direction.

Social implications

The movement of people formerly diagnosed with schizophrenia from secondary mental health services back to primary care may have huge social implications. Resistance, stigma and ignorance play a large part in services “having to” retain people within secondary mental health services. Misunderstandings around diagnosis, and terms such as remission and recovery fuel such confusion resulting in a risk averse position for most. This study clarifies some of the issues in relation to the transition back to society and citizenship for people and offers scope for further research of a qualitative nature too.

Originality/value

Previous studies around the concept of remission for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia have centred on medication efficacy, utilising remission criteria to determine changes in symptomolotolgy. These quantitative papers have not addressed service users, carers or practitioners in healthcare in relation to their understanding of the term remission, in relation to recovery; or whether they feel it would be of use in clinical practice. This study addressed those issues gaining valuable in-depth data from participants, deriving the social construction of remission and the impact it may have in clinical practice in a non-pathologising perspective.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jill Manthorpe and Helen Alaszewski

This article reports on the findings of a small research study exploring provision at local level for people with dementia. The study involved a survey of practitioners…

Abstract

This article reports on the findings of a small research study exploring provision at local level for people with dementia. The study involved a survey of practitioners and managers, and the difficulties of this approach are illustrated and explored. Responses contained a range of relevant opinions about service delivery, particularly perceived levels of quality and adequacy. Those providing care pointed to the unfulfilled potential of services for people with dementia, and their views provide a perspective on the workings of local services and their inter‐relationships. The views of staff may be helpful to the development of planning and quality mechanisms. While they cannot substitute for those of users and carers, they are views emanating from experience and concern.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Ian McGonagle

This paper will review aspects of current policy in mental health with specific reference to policy that has a values focus. In this context, values refers to the…

Abstract

This paper will review aspects of current policy in mental health with specific reference to policy that has a values focus. In this context, values refers to the standards and expectations we hold and which we use to guide aspects of practice performance. Service users state that core values that support, respect choice, collaboration, and customer service are critical foundation stones of a trusting therapeutic relationship. Attending to these foundations for practice has merit in ensuring the quality of care delivery in mental health. This paper will analyse what this means for the mental health workforce in their engagement with service users and delivery of policy priorities. Finally, the paper will explore resources, such as the Ten Essential Shared Capabilities (see Appendix 1), which support engagement and ongoing promotion of person‐centred mental health care.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Vanessa Pinfold, Paulina Szymczynska, Sarah Hamilton, Richard Peacocke, Shirley Dean, Naomi Clewett, Jill Manthorpe and John Larsen

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of co-producing mental health research where work was shared between university academics, charity-based researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of co-producing mental health research where work was shared between university academics, charity-based researchers and a Lived Experience Advisory Panel.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors express the opinions of a research team made up of people with experience of using mental health services, being carers and being academically trained researchers from a range of health and social science disciplines. Some had experience in several areas. The paper is co-produced to provide collective reflection and recommendations.

Findings

Co-production of research is not well documented in published literature. The authors believe there is scope to develop co-production approaches, but further conceptual and theoretical work is needed alongside empirical studies. A socially situated complex research project, possibly involving multi-stakeholder groups, demands flexibility in approach. Similarly to user-controlled and other emancipatory methodologies, co-production makes the democratisation of research a primary objective in order to produce better quality and more relevant studies. Co-production also addresses inequalities in power and control within research projects; this way of working does provide a healthy challenge to traditional research hierarchies.

Practical implications

Lessons learned should be honestly shared to develop co-production research methods. Projects need to have a strategy for how to value different contributions and facilitate constructive relationships if discord emerges. Establishing clear project roles, expectations and process for payment are essential in developing genuine collaborative partnerships.

Originality/value

It is a viewpoint paper.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Mary Acton

The evidence‐based approach to social services will deliver higher quality only if the necessary evidence on what works is there and available to managers. Success will…

Abstract

The evidence‐based approach to social services will deliver higher quality only if the necessary evidence on what works is there and available to managers. Success will also require an organisational change, away from the ‘culture of action’ and towards one of assessment, reflection and training; evidence is of no value unless it is understood and digested.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Stephen Peckham

Examines the evidence on the extent to which young people’s sexual health services contribute to the prevention of teenage pregnancy. Reports the findings of a survey of…

Abstract

Examines the evidence on the extent to which young people’s sexual health services contribute to the prevention of teenage pregnancy. Reports the findings of a survey of health, education, youth and social services, and providers of services, which was undertaken for the Department of Health. Summarizes other recent reviews of evaluations of services and young people’s sexual health services. Provides guidance for health, education, youth and social services purchasers and providers on good practice for young people’s services and identifies gaps in our knowledge where further research is needed. Argues for closer working with young people in identifying their sexual health needs and in the development and monitoring of services.

Details

Health Education, vol. 97 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Louise Thomson, Justine Schneider and Nicola Wright

The purpose of this paper is to review the role of social networks in the translation of research into practice, propose a broader model of communities of practice (CoPs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the role of social networks in the translation of research into practice, propose a broader model of communities of practice (CoPs) involving practitioners, researchers and service users, and describe a case report which adopts this broader model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the evidence on both knowledge transfer and the use of CoPs to share practice, this work presents an approach to supporting and developing CoPs around the specific context of an applied research programme in health and social care.

Findings

The development of CoPs across the professional and organisational boundaries of researchers, practitioners, and service users has the potential to enhance the translation of evidence into practice. It requires bringing together the right people and providing a supportive infrastructure to facilitate exchanges. Methods of engaging and involving the different stakeholder groups vary according to the specific context and pre‐existing networks, but developing closer working relationships and sharing common values is an important step in this process. Within the applied health research partnership of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire (CLAHRC‐NDL), the role of Diffusion Fellows, Engagement Fellows and CLAHRC Associates provides a way of engaging with its diverse stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper builds on existing evidence about CoPs and the role of social networks in knowledge transfer.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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