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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Elly Philpott and David Owen

The chapter evaluates the value of practice-based teaching and learning on a UK postgraduate unit and describes the development of conceptual models for the student…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter evaluates the value of practice-based teaching and learning on a UK postgraduate unit and describes the development of conceptual models for the student practice-based experience.

Methodology/approach

Student experience is explored through the use of an in-depth case study. Student understanding is explored through an exit survey of students.

Findings

Student experience of the unit was positive and negative. Positive experiences stem from good client communications, a motivated student team, and the buzz of a real project. Positive experiences appear to lead to a perception of pride in outcomes and personal transferrable skills. Negative experiences stem from the lack of life experience, language difficulties, client unavailability, lack of subject knowledge, and literature gaps which left students feeling ill-equipped to deal with the international group context. Negative experiences lead to stress and poor group development.

Research limitations

The study is based on a single simple case. The methodology has sought to reduce problems with internal validity and bias. The data collection and analysis methods are repeatable and we encourage other academics to test our conceptual models and conclusions.

Originality/value

Conceptual models for positive and negative experience are proposed.

The study suggests there is a balance to be sought between providing a positive student experience and practical learning. Practice-based learning adds significant value to the student in terms of improved understanding of hard and soft tools, but may need to be based upon positive and negative experience.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Airi Rovio-Johansson

The paper aims to examine, within the context of professional practice and learning, how designers collaboratively working in international teams experience practice-based

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine, within the context of professional practice and learning, how designers collaboratively working in international teams experience practice-based learning and how such occasions contribute to professional development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces the cooperation project between Tibro Training Centre and Furniture Technology Centre Trust and its workshop context organized as practice-based learning. Participants’ learning context consisted of a mixture of professional practices allowing different logics and different cultures make up an innovative working site. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interview data suggests that three phenomenographic hierarchical categories constitute the learning process: getting a recognized professional identity; perceiving new elements and expanding knowledge and seeing new aspects of design work and new steps of development in profession.

Findings

Cooperative practice-based learning is understood as social practice in a community of practice, and as continuous changes of the learning object due to that new aspects are discerned by the learners. These categories illustrate how participants’ meaning making and understanding of the learning object were expressed in cooperation as doings and sayings, as translation and as situated activities in a community of practice. Accordingly, it contributed to participants’ professional development in spite of their different professional educations and professional experiences.

Practical implications

More studies of practice-based learning environments in work places are needed that could help societies and companies to advance integrative efforts of new employees and new immigrants into an increasingly diverse globalized labour market.

Originality/value

The results suggest that understanding as well as content structure and meaning making of the learning object are intertwined constituent aspects of practice-based learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Briga Hynes, Yvonne Costin and Naomi Birdthistle

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practice‐based entrepreneurship education programme which enhances collaboration between educational institutions and the small…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practice‐based entrepreneurship education programme which enhances collaboration between educational institutions and the small business community as a means of producing a more employable, well rounded and skilled graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

A case description of the business consulting programme operated at the University of Limerick.

Findings

The findings highlight how a practice‐based learning module brings real business learning into the classroom and simultaneously attends to the needs of different internal and external stakeholders by producing a more flexible and employable professional graduate. Furthermore, it creates a more meaningful relationship between education institutions (knowledge producers) and industry (knowledge users).

Research limitations/implications

Educators need to evaluate the benefits of practice‐based learning programmes from the external stakeholder perspective as a basis of identifying more innovative practice‐based learning options.

Originality/value

The paper draws attention to the need for, and suggestions on how educational institutions can be more outward focussed and responsive to the needs of industry when designing educational programmes.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based

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4894

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based innovation processes in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument is driven by conceptual analysis and theoretical synthesis based on theory and research on innovation, organizational change, individual and organizational learning.

Findings

The proposed framework portrays practice‐based innovation as a cyclical process of adaptive and developmental learning driven by contradictions and tensions between explicit and implicit dimensions of work processes.

Originality/value

The paper adds to previous research through its focus on practice‐based innovation and the conceptualization of this notion in terms of learning in and through everyday work. It thus creates connections between innovation research and research on workplace learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Kwok Wah Ronnie Lui and Sarojni Choy

This paper aims to report on a study that used the practice theory lens to understand how Chinese ethnic culture influences restaurant workers' learning through engagement…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a study that used the practice theory lens to understand how Chinese ethnic culture influences restaurant workers' learning through engagement in everyday work practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach was used. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and site observations. Thematic analysis was conducted to identify how workers learnt the sayings, doings and relatings in their workplaces.

Findings

The findings show that the ethnic culture of the participants influences and enriches their learning in practice settings such as small Chinese restaurants.

Research limitations/implications

The understandings presented here need to be verified through more research in different regions and nations. In addition, cross-cultural studies on other ethnic restaurants may contribute to deeper understandings of the influences of ethnic culture on practice-based learning.

Social implications

The research contributes to understanding the influence of ethnic culture on practice-based learning.

Originality/value

The understandings gained from the findings of this study form a useful basis for curriculum development and instructional design of training programmes for practice-based as well as work-integrated-learning components of vocational curriculum. Furthermore, awareness of the strengths of the ethnic culture is of interest to owner/managers of small Chinese restaurants to afford supportive learning environments for workers.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Maggie Johnson and Max Senges

This paper seeks to analyse the effectiveness and impact of how Google currently trains its new software engineers (“Nooglers”) to become productive in the software…

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6746

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse the effectiveness and impact of how Google currently trains its new software engineers (“Nooglers”) to become productive in the software engineering community. The research focuses on the institutions and support for practice‐based learning and cognitive apprenticeship in the Google environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a series of semi‐structured interviews with 24 Google stakeholders. These interviews are complemented by observations, document analysis, and review of existing survey and statistical data.

Findings

It is found that Google offers a state‐of‐the‐art onboarding program and benchmark qualities that provide legitimate peripheral participation. The research reveals how Google empowers programmers to “feel at home” using company coding practices, as well as maximizing peer‐learning and collaborative practices. These practices reduce isolation, enhance collegiality, and increase employee morale and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The case study describes the practices in one company.

Practical implications

The research documented in the paper can be used as a benchmark for other onboarding and practice‐based learning set‐ups.

Originality/value

This is the first research that gives insights into the practice‐based learning and onboarding practices at Google. The practices are assessed to be state‐of‐the‐art and the insights therefore relevant for benchmarking exercises of other companies.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Ulrik Brandi and Rosa Lisa Iannone

This contribution highlights opportunities for new insights into organizational learning processes through the use of practice-based innovative organizational learning

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1476

Abstract

Purpose

This contribution highlights opportunities for new insights into organizational learning processes through the use of practice-based innovative organizational learning technologies (iOLTs). The article explores the varied possibilities and application of learning technologies in terms of organizational learning perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Given this is a relatively new field of practice and research, the three organizational learning theoretical perspectives – behavioural, action and practice – form a base upon which we can conceptualise learning as mediated through iOLTs and how we can leverage these technologies, particularly for practice-based organizational learning, which focuses more on the intangibles of learning.

Findings

Due to the pervasive and ubiquitous potential of organizational learning technologies, new avenues for analysing the mediating effect of technologies on learning enable our research and practice attention to shift from formal learning to the informal; from top-down learning management to bottom-up learning creation; from cognitive and behavioural approaches to social, spontaneous and contextual learning – helping us decipher the “language” of learning in concrete ways.

Originality/value

The iOLTs are emerging and at an ever-increasing pace. Practice-based iOLTs can help trace and decipher the “language” of learning in concrete ways, which is a key aspect in our being able to leverage our organizational learning capacities.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Andrea Keck Frei, Mirjam Kocher and Christine Bieri Buschor

The purpose of this study is to examine career-change student teachers’ practice-based learning in teacher training, with a special focus on the support they received.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine career-change student teachers’ practice-based learning in teacher training, with a special focus on the support they received.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a qualitative content analysis of 15 group interviews, including 58 career-change student teachers and focuses on their learning at university and the workplace.

Findings

This paper indicates that career-change student teachers’ learning is task-related and based on interactions. It benefits from the support provided by actors at the university and workplace. Their learning is highly self-regulated and built on skills from prior professional and life experience. However, behaviourist learning and trial-and-error learning strategies are more often mentioned than constructionist learning and goal-oriented learning.

Practical implications

The findings underline the fact that universities and schools can enhance career-change student teachers’ learning by providing professional support, helping them to form links between experience from their prior profession, as well as their knowledge acquired at the university and experience from the workplace.

Originality/value

Until now, few studies have addressed workplace learning in teacher education. The present study aims to address this lack. Moreover, the study shows how career-change student teachers deal with the challenge of bridging the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge acquired during practice-based teacher education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2019

Ruben Toledano-O’Farrill

The purpose of this paper is to present the methodology and results of practice-based learning in the Business School of a higher education institution (HEI) in Mexico…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the methodology and results of practice-based learning in the Business School of a higher education institution (HEI) in Mexico, with a focus on students’ participation and learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a descriptive and qualitative analysis of six team experiences within a larger project developed through university–business partnership with the aim of helping develop organizational capabilities of small and medium enterprises within the Tequila industry in Mexico.

Findings

Participation of students in project-based learning, in genuine scenarios alongside professional consultants, is an effective way to develop learning and to apply prior knowledge. Learning occurs at several levels, including developing professional knowledge, teamwork, leadership and communication skills, and to some extent consulting skills. Client organizations also develop learning in work-based learning (WBL) projects.

Research limitations/implications

The research methodology does not allow for generalization of the results on a large scale.

Practical implications

This research shows a successful instance of project- and practice-based learning that may be helpful for HEIs seeking to implement this learning methodology.

Social implications

There is research evidence that more students are expecting to get practice-based skills as part of their higher education training. This paper supports the argument that HEIs can develop wide scale WBL programs that have impact on students’ learning and skills development as well as on the development of host organizations.

Originality/value

The instance of WBL described in this research paper is unique within HEIs in Mexico.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Frances Gordon, Claire Walsh, Michelle Marshall, Fiona Wilson and Tim Hunt

The modernisation agenda in health and social care is concerned with providing an integrated service for patients/clients and their carers. This paper focuses on the…

Abstract

The modernisation agenda in health and social care is concerned with providing an integrated service for patients/clients and their carers. This paper focuses on the nature of practice‐based learning environments that support the development of students as effective interprofessional practitioners for the modernised health and social care services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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