Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Larry Maheady, Cynthia Smith and Michael Jabot

Evidence-based practice (EBP) can have a powerful impact on school-aged children. Yet this impact may not be realized if classroom teachers do not use empirically…

Abstract

Evidence-based practice (EBP) can have a powerful impact on school-aged children. Yet this impact may not be realized if classroom teachers do not use empirically supported interventions and/or fail to include the best research available when they make important educational decisions about children. Whether classroom teachers use EBP may be influenced, in part, by what they learned or failed to learn in their preservice preparation programs. This chapter describes recent efforts to assess preservice teachers’ understanding and use of empirically supported interventions and provides four examples of how such practices were taught to preservice general educators in a small, regional teacher preparation program. We discuss four contemporary educational reform movements (i.e., federal policies mandating EBP, state-level policies linking growth in pupil learning to teacher evaluation, clinically rich teacher preparation, and the emergence of a practice-based evidence approach) that should increase interest and use of EBP in teacher education and offer recommendations for how teacher educators might infuse EBP into their traditional teaching, research, and service functions in higher education.

Details

Evidence-Based Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-429-9

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Aida Malovic, Rowena Rossiter and Glynis Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of Keep Safe, a manualised group intervention for adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of Keep Safe, a manualised group intervention for adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display harmful sexual behaviour (HSB) as the initial phase of a feasibility study. National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. Aims included taking account of adolescents’ and families’ needs, motivations and practical commitments, integrating best- practice and being accessible and appropriate across different types of services.

Design/methodology/approach

Keep Safe development progressed from the practitioner/researcher collaborative young sex offender treatment services collaborative-ID through a project team, Keep Safe development group, comprising a range of practitioners with a variety of clinical expertise across services and an Advisory Group of people with ID. An expert-consensus methodology based on the Delphi method was used. The iterative process for the manual draws on the slim practice-based evidence from UK, New Zealand, North America and Australia.

Findings

Keep Safe comprises six modules distributed through 36 term-time young people’s sessions, alongside 16 concurrent parental/ carer sessions (some joint). The main focus of Keep Safe is to enhance well-being and reduce harm. Four initial sites volunteered as feasibility leads, and two more were added as recruitment was more difficult than foreseen.

Originality/value

National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. This study is innovative and valuable given the recognition that research and practice is significantly lacking in this area.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Per Nilsen, Gunilla Nordström and Per‐Erik Ellström

This paper seeks to present a theoretical framework with the aim of contributing to improved understanding of how reflection can provide a mechanism to integrate…

5452

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a theoretical framework with the aim of contributing to improved understanding of how reflection can provide a mechanism to integrate research‐based knowledge with the pre‐existing practice‐based knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an explanation of important concepts: research‐based and practice‐based knowledge, four levels of action and two modes of learning. Two mini cases concerning managers in the public sector in Sweden then provide an illustration of how research‐based knowledge can be utilized to challenge practice‐based knowledge. The concluding discussion addresses some of the challenges involved in achieving reflection in the workplace that utilizes research‐based knowledge.

Findings

The reflection programmes had several characteristics that facilitated their implementation: they achieved a balance between the workplace demands on the participating managers and time required for the reflection; the participants were specifically recruited, had full management support and were highly motivated to be part of the reflection groups; the facilitators played key roles in structuring the managers' discussions and linking their experiences to relevant research‐based knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Methodological limitations of the cases constrain the conclusions to be drawn from these studies. However, it should be emphasized that the case studies were intended primarily as illustrations of how workplace reflection can be used to integrate research‐based and practice‐based knowledge. Obviously, there is a risk of social desirability bias because the interviewer was also involved in developing and implementing the reflection programmes. She also participated as a supervisor in mini case 2.

Originality/value

The literature on reflection has largely focused on reflection in the context of education, training and preparing for work or a profession. The role of workplace reflection and learning for practitioners and managers in work has received far less attention. The emergence of the evidence‐based practice (EBP) agenda has further highlighted the importance of workplace learning and reflection, as practitioners are increasingly expected to critically appraise research studies and integrate new findings into their practice. A more EBP requires reflecting practitioners who are able to synthesize research‐based knowledge with their own practice‐based knowledge acquired through experience. However, the process of integrating research‐based and practice‐based knowledge has not been the focus of much study.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Padraig Collins and Sarah Crowe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the discourses which exist around the alleviation of mental distress, from the different perspective of mental health professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the discourses which exist around the alleviation of mental distress, from the different perspective of mental health professionals and service users. It then looks at the use of “practice-based evidence” as a means of bringing together these two diverging discourses.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on the discourses which exist around the cause and treatment of mental distress, from the perspective of professionals and service users, is first explored. Differences between these two discourses are identified, as are theoretical and practical limitations of current professional diagnostic and treatment paradigms. Finally the use of practice-based evidence as a means of bridging the gap between these two discourses is outlined.

Findings

This paper highlights marked differences between the discourse which exists for professionals, and that for service users, around alleviating mental distress. The use of practice-based evidence is explored, not only as a means of bringing these two varying discourses together, but also as a tool which could help to improve treatment outcome in a way which is more inclusive of service users and fits with both empiricism and a broader recovery ethos.

Originality/value

This paper applies a “practice-based evidence” approach to bringing together the divergent perspectives regarding mental health of service providers and users. In doing so it provides a practical and pragmatic approach to true collaborative working.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Lydia A. Beahm and Bryan G. Cook

The research-to-practice gap occurs when practices supported as effective by research are infrequently used in applied settings, such as classrooms. This gap may be due to…

Abstract

The research-to-practice gap occurs when practices supported as effective by research are infrequently used in applied settings, such as classrooms. This gap may be due to teachers preferring to use practices they find to be trustworthy, usable, and accessible. Instead of relying on research, teachers frequently use resources from other teachers, which may be because teachers prefer practices that are supported by evidence developed in applied settings (i.e., practice-based evidence [PBE]). Using PBE to support the application of evidence-based practices (EBPs) may increase the latter's use in classrooms. In this chapter, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both EBPs and PBE and how the two can complement each other to help lessen the research-to-practice gap. We also discuss mixed-methods approaches that can be used to combine EBPs with PBE.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Sean Creaney

The purpose of the paper is to examine the discourses of risk, prevention and early intervention, with particular reference, to the treatment of girls in the contemporary…

1301

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the discourses of risk, prevention and early intervention, with particular reference, to the treatment of girls in the contemporary Youth Justice System.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has two broad objectives: first, the paper reviews the literature on early intervention and youth crime prevention policy. Second, the paper focuses on youth justice practice in relation to girls who are engaged in youth justice processes or “at risk” of criminal involvement.

Findings

The paper argues that: girls are drawn into the system for welfare rather than crime‐related matters; and youth justice policy and practice seems to negate girls' gender‐specific needs. Moreover, the paper highlights research evidence and practice‐based experience, and contends that youth justice policy and practice must be re‐developed in favour of incorporating gender‐specific, child and young person centred practices.

Originality/value

The results presented in this article will be particularly pertinent to policy makers, educators and practitioners in the sphere of youth justice, especially since the contemporary youth justice system, in its rigorous, actuarial pursuance of risk management, fails to distinguish between “genders” within its formulaic assessment documentation.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Lindsay Stoetzel and Sandra Taylor-Marshall

Across K–12 settings, instructional coaching continues to flourish as an approach to teacher professional development intended to address long-standing inequities in…

Abstract

Purpose

Across K–12 settings, instructional coaching continues to flourish as an approach to teacher professional development intended to address long-standing inequities in student achievement. Yet, coaching models differ in how to conceptualize change or transformation as a result of coaching efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study problematizes the concept of change within one practice-based coaching program, by positing the possibilities of striving for transformational change directed at addressing educational inequities.

Findings

Qualitative methods reveal how coaching belief statements guide the burgeoning identities of beginning coaches to align to (and at times extend beyond) coaching for change through the lens of teacher practice.

Practical implications

Implications describe ways that coaching programs might utilize reflection and analysis activities to foster more equity-oriented coaching identities, regardless of coaching model.

Originality/value

Designing and facilitating authentic learning opportunities for coaches to reflect, rehearse, connect, and apply knowledge to practice as they develop their own understanding of what it means to coach for change is crucial.

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Helen Payne and Susan D.M. Brooks

The purpose of this paper is to summarise practice-based evidence from an analysis of outcomes from a county-wide pilot study of a specialised primary care clinic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise practice-based evidence from an analysis of outcomes from a county-wide pilot study of a specialised primary care clinic employing an original approach for patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). Conditions with persistent bodily symptoms for which tests and scans come back negative are termed MUS. Patients are generic, high health-utilising and for most there is no effective current treatment pathway. The solution is a proven service based on proof of concept, cost-effectiveness and market research studies together with practice-based evidence from early adopters. The research was transferred from a university into a real-world primary care clinical service which has been delivering in two clinical commissioning groups in a large county in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Clinical data calculated as reliable change from the various clinics were aggregated as practice-based evidence pre- and post-intervention via standardised measurements on anxiety, depression, symptom distress, functioning/activity, and wellbeing. It is not a research paper.

Findings

At post-course the following percentages of people report reliable improvement when compared to pre-course: reductions in symptom distress 63 per cent (39/62), anxiety 42 per cent (13/31) and depression 35 per cent (11/31); increases in activity levels 58 per cent (18/31) and wellbeing 55 per cent (17/31) and 70 per cent felt that they had enough help to go forward resulting in the self-management of their symptoms which decreases the need to visit the GP or hospital.

Research limitations/implications

Without a full clinical trial the outcomes must be interpreted with caution. There may be a possible Hawthorne or observer effect.

Practical implications

Despite the small numbers who received this intervention, preliminary observations suggest it might offer a feasible alternative for many patients with MUS who reject, or try and find unsatisfying, cognitive behaviour therapy.

Social implications

Many patients suffering MUS feel isolated and that they are the only one for whom their doctor cannot find an organic cause for their condition. The facilitated group has a beneficial effect on this problem, for example they feel a sense of belonging and sharing of their story.

Originality/value

The BodyMind Approach is an original intervention mirroring the new wave of research in neuroscience and philosophy which prides embodiment perspectives over solely cognitive ones preferred in the “talking” therapies. There is a sea change in thinking about processes and models for supporting people with mental ill-health where the need to include the lived body experience is paramount to transformation.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Steve Morgan

Assertive outreach is based on extensive international research and has been promoted in the UK in 1999 as a key area of the National Service Framework for Mental Health…

190

Abstract

Assertive outreach is based on extensive international research and has been promoted in the UK in 1999 as a key area of the National Service Framework for Mental Health. Its primary aim is to provide a specialist service for people disengaged from traditional approaches of mental health services, but very little attention has been paid to how such services can be developed. Practice Based Evidence, a practice development consultancy, has engaged seven assertive outreach teams to focus on development first, and follow‐up evaluation of the impact of reflective practice on team functioning. This has prompted a number of strengths‐based recommendations for changing the way we think about developing services before we engage in research and evaluation.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Peter Cockersell

The purpose of this paper is to consider evidence for the effectiveness of the psychologically informed environments (PIEs) approach to working with homeless people in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider evidence for the effectiveness of the psychologically informed environments (PIEs) approach to working with homeless people in the five years since the national guidance was published.

Design/methodology/approach

The author reviewed the intended outcomes of the original guidance and then looked at a range of data from evaluations of current PIE services in UK and Ireland.

Findings

The findings were that the PIE approach is effective in meeting the outcomes suggested by the original guidance; in reducing social exclusion and improving the mental health of homeless people; and in improving staff morale and interactions.

Research limitations/implications

This is a practice-based evidence. There needs to be more practice-based evidence gathered, and it would be useful if there were some standardised measures, as long as these did not limit the richness of the data which suggests that PIEs have a wide, not narrow, impact.

Practical implications

The implications are that homelessness services should use the PIE approach, and that they should be supported by clinically trained psychotherapists or psychologists; and that wider mental health services should look at the PIE approach in terms of working effectively with socially excluded people with complex needs/mental health problems.

Social implications

PIEs are an effective way of working with socially excluded people with mental health problems/complex needs, enabling the reduction of social exclusion among this very excluded client group.

Originality/value

This is the first review of evidence, much of it so far unpublished, for the effectiveness of PIEs, despite the fact that this approach has been increasingly adopted by both providers and commissioners in the homelessness sector.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000