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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Danielle A. Tucker, Jane Hendy and James Barlow

As management innovations become more complex, infrastructure needs to change in order to accommodate new work practices. Different challenges are associated with work…

Abstract

Purpose

As management innovations become more complex, infrastructure needs to change in order to accommodate new work practices. Different challenges are associated with work practice redesign and infrastructure change however; combining these presents a dual challenge and additional challenges associated with this interaction. The purpose of this paper is to ask: what are the challenges which arise from work practice redesign, infrastructure change and simultaneously attempting both in a single transformation?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a longitudinal study of three hospitals in three different countries (UK, USA and Canada) transforming both their infrastructure and work practices. Data consists of 155 ethnographic interviews complemented by 205 documents and 36 hours of observations collected over two phases for each case study.

Findings

This paper identifies that work practice redesign challenges the cognitive load of organizational members whilst infrastructure change challenges the project management and structure of the organization. Simultaneous transformation represents a disconnect between the two aspects of change resulting in a failure to understand the relationship between work and design.

Practical implications

These challenges suggest that organizations need to make a distinction between the two aspects of transformation and understand the unique tensions of simultaneously tackling these dual challenges. They must ensure that they have adequate skills and resources with which to build this distinction into their change planning.

Originality/value

This paper unpacks two different aspects of complex change and considers the neglected challenges associated with modern change management objectives.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

S. Limam Mansar and H.A. Reijers

This paper seeks to provide business process redesign (BPR) practitioners and academics with insight into the most popular heuristics to derive improved process designs.

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6082

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide business process redesign (BPR) practitioners and academics with insight into the most popular heuristics to derive improved process designs.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was carried out in the years 2003‐2004 among a wide range of experienced BPR practitioners in the UK and The Netherlands.

Findings

The survey indicates that this “top ten” of best practices is indeed extensively used in practice. Moreover, indications for their business impact have been collected and classified.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' estimations of best practices effectiveness differed from feedback obtained from respondents, possibly caused by the design of the survey instrument. This is food for further research.

Practical implications

The presented framework can be used by practitioners to keep the various aspects of a redesign in perspective. The presented list of BPR best practices is directly applicable to derive new process designs.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the subject of process redesign, rather than the more popular subject of process reengineering. As such, it fills in part an existing gap in knowledge.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

James T. Mellone and David J. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to examine the best practices in web site redesign the authors established for its two interconnected parts, the web development process and…

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1353

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the best practices in web site redesign the authors established for its two interconnected parts, the web development process and web design. The paper demonstrates how best practices were applied to coordinate a library web site redesign project and to engineer the web site for optimum usability, resulting in the creation of a new improved web site.

Design/methodology/approach

A problem‐solution approach was used to analyze how the Queens College Libraries (QCL) fell behind in web technology and how it revitalized its web operations. The paper presents a detailed exposition of a three stage project, and provides reasons for adopting best practices in redesigning each web site area.

Findings

In a resource‐challenged mid‐sized academic library, like QCL, it is still possible to create a fully functional easy‐to‐use web site.

Practical implications

The QCL experience has lessons for other libraries in similar circumstances. A mid‐sized academic library adopting a best practices approach to web redesign can successfully coordinate an open and inclusive development process and use public web standards to engineer a functional web site responsive to user needs.

Originality/value

Unlike other case studies of web redesign projects at academic libraries, this paper focus on both the web development process and web design, explicating the establishment and application of best practices for both areas.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Tjongabangwe Selaolo and Hugo Lotriet

The purpose of this paper is to report on a co-design process that was initiated between government and the private sector in Botswana to redesign current ISD practice

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a co-design process that was initiated between government and the private sector in Botswana to redesign current ISD practice with particular focus on finding a solution for learning failure. Learning failure was analysed retrospectively using concepts of “task conscious” and “learning conscious” learning.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of a typical Botswana ISD project in which the lead researcher participated, inefficiencies and shortcomings in the standardised Botswana ISD process in terms of full utilisation of learning processes to support systems success were examined. Through the Developmental Work Research (DWR) methodology, which is based on Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) principles, IS practitioners from government and the private sector, together with users collaborated to redesign the current Botswana ISD work practice in order to address this shortcoming.

Findings

The result has been the incorporation of activity-based learning and reflection into a proposed improved ISD practice framework for Botswana.

Practical implications

Through collaborative redesign between government and industry, a new Botswana ISD practice model that incorporates activity-based learning and reflection has been designed, and findings from examination of the model suggest that it has potential to address current learning deficiencies and thus contribute to efforts of avoiding IS failures. There have also been contributions to DWR resulting from the way in which the methodology was applied.

Originality/value

This is the first known study that uses concepts of “task-conscious” and “learning-conscious” learning to analyse learning retrospectively and at the same time adopting the DWR methodology in the social context of a developing country such as Botswana.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Terrie McLaughlin Galanti, Courtney Katharine Baker, Kimberly Morrow-Leong and Tammy Kraft

In spring 2020, educators throughout the world abruptly shifted to emergency remote teaching in response to an emerging pandemic. The instructors of a graduate-level…

Abstract

Purpose

In spring 2020, educators throughout the world abruptly shifted to emergency remote teaching in response to an emerging pandemic. The instructors of a graduate-level synchronous online geometry and measurement course for practicing school teachers redesigned their summative assessments. Their goals were to reduce outside-of-class work and to model the integration of content, pedagogy and technology. This paper aims to describe the development of a digital interactive notebook (dINB) assignment using online presentation software, dynamic geometry tools and mathematical learning trajectories. Broader implications for dINBs as assessments in effective distance learning are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative analysis in this study consists of a sequence of first-cycle coding of mid-semester surveys and second-cycle thematic categorizations of mid-semester surveys and end-of-course reflections. Descriptive categorization counts along with select quotations from open-ended participant responses provided a window on evolving participant experiences with the dINB across the course.

Findings

Modifications to the dINB design based on teacher mid-semester feedback created a flexible assessment tool aligned with the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework. The teachers also constructed their own visions for adapting the dINB for student-centered instructional technology integration in their own virtual classrooms.

Originality/value

The development of the dINB enriched the TPACK understandings of the instructors in this study. It also positioned teachers to facilitate innovative synchronous and blended learning in their own school communities. Further analysis of dINB artifacts in future studies will test the hypothesis that practicing teachers’ experiences as learners increased their TPACK knowledge.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Aline Pietrix Seepma, Carolien de Blok and Dirk Pieter Van Donk

Many countries aim to improve public services by use of information and communication technology (ICT) in public service supply chains. However, the literature does not…

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2284

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries aim to improve public services by use of information and communication technology (ICT) in public service supply chains. However, the literature does not address how inter-organizational ICT is used in redesigning these particular supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to explore this important and under-investigated area.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative multiple-case study was performed based on 36 interviews, 39 documents, extensive field visits and observations providing data on digital transformation in four European criminal justice supply chains.

Findings

Two different design approaches to digital transformation were found, which are labelled digitization and digitalization. These approaches are characterized by differences in public service strategies, performance aims, and how specific public characteristics and procedures are dealt with. Despite featuring different roles for ICT, both types show the viable digital transformation of public service supply chains. Additionally, the application of inter-organizational ICT is found not to automatically result in changes in the coordination and management of the chain, in contrast to common assumptions.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to adopt an inter-organizational perspective on the use of ICT in public service supply chains. The findings have scientific and managerial value because fine-grained insights are provided into how public service supply chains can use ICT in an inter-organizational setting. The study shows the dilemmas faced by and possible options for public organizations when designing digital service delivery.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Abhishek Sahu, Saurabh Agrawal and Girish Kumar

Industry 4.0 and circular economy are the two major areas in the current manufacturing industry. However, the adoption and implementation of Industry 4.0 and circular…

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55

Abstract

Purpose

Industry 4.0 and circular economy are the two major areas in the current manufacturing industry. However, the adoption and implementation of Industry 4.0 and circular economy worldwide are still in the nascent stage of development. To address this gap, the purpose of this article is to conduct a systematic literature review on integrating Industry 4.0 and circular economy. Further, identify the research gaps and provide the future scope of work in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Content-based analysis was adopted for reviewing the research articles and proposed a transition framework that comprises of four categories, namely, (1) Transition from Industry 3.0 to Industry 4.0 and integration with circular economy; (2) Adoption of combined factors and different issues; (3) Implementation possibilities such as front-end technologies, integration capabilities and redesigning strategies; (4) Current challenges. The proposed study reviewed a total of 204 articles published from 2000 to 2020 based on these categories.

Findings

The article presents a systematic literature review of the last two decades that integrates Industry 4.0 and circular economy concepts. Findings revealed that very few studies considered the adoption and implementation issues of Industry 4.0 and circular economy. Moreover, it was found that Industry 4.0 technologies including digitalization, real-time monitoring and decision-making capabilities played a significant role in circular economy implementation. The major elements are discussed through the analysis of the transition and integration framework. The study further revealed that a limited number of developing countries like India have taken preliminary initiatives toward Industry 4.0 and circular economy implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The study proposes a transition and integration framework that identifies adoption and implementation issues and challenges. This framework will help researchers and practitioners in implementation of Industry 4.0 and circular economy.

Originality/value

Reviews of articles indicated that there are very few studies on integrating Industry 4.0 and circular economy. Moreover, there are very few articles addressing adoption and implementation issues such as legal, ethical, operational and demographic issues, which may be used to monitor the organization's performance and productivity.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Jerry D. VanVactor

The purpose of this work is to add to professional practice and academia information related specifically to health care supply chain management and to demonstrate how an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is to add to professional practice and academia information related specifically to health care supply chain management and to demonstrate how an existing health care management model can be applied to supply chain operations.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a review of practice‐oriented literature related to the patient‐centered medical home model this work examines and expounds on the implications and applicability toward more effective supply chain management.

Findings

This paper presents a discourse in evaluating health care supply chain management processes to place more emphasis on interactive customer relationships, collaborative communications, and more effective support to health care operations.

Practical implications

An effective health care supply chain operation involves key tenets of ensuring that the right products are provided to the right customer in a timely manner. While this discussion is directed specifically toward health care, the principles are applicable across a wide array of industries.

Social implications

Health care logistics involves a symbiotic relationship among multi‐disciplined, multifaceted stakeholders working closely together and leveraging one another, patients, and technology to produce a desired outcome related to cost effective processes and business practices.

Originality/value

While existent literature provides information related to the effective management of logistics (outside of health care organizations) little information is directly concerned with operations within a health care environment. In an applied sense, this article provides practitioners with concepts related to cost reduction and effective supply chain management.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Elena Fraj, Eva Martínez and Jorge Matute

Following the natural resource based view of the firm, this paper seeks to analyse the influence of a green marketing strategy on the performance of business‐to‐business…

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5989

Abstract

Purpose

Following the natural resource based view of the firm, this paper seeks to analyse the influence of a green marketing strategy on the performance of business‐to‐business organisations. Also, it aims to explore the role of organisational resources as drivers of proactive environmental management.

Design/methodology/approach

A model based on structural equations with partial least squares analysis is used to test the hypotheses. This model was tested on a sample of 181 industrial organisations.

Findings

The findings confirm that managers indirectly play a key role in the design and development of green marketing strategies through the integration of environmental values into the organisational culture. They also reveal that, while market‐oriented practices directly determine economic performance, internally oriented activities indirectly influence financial results through the improvement of the firm's environmental performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research partially integrates organisational resources as drivers of environmental behaviour, and does not explore the role of capabilities. The article proposes different implications considering the competitive consequences of a green marketing strategy.

Practical implications

The article includes different practical implications about the effect of different environmental practices on different dimensions of organisational performance. It sheds light on the controversial link between environmental proactivity and performance.

Originality/value

This research tests empirically some of the theoretical underpinnings of the natural resource based view of the company in an under‐researched context like the business‐to‐business context.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

There are many implications for middle-skill and low-skill workers as emerging technologies and trends continue to evolve related to using technology in the workplace…

Abstract

There are many implications for middle-skill and low-skill workers as emerging technologies and trends continue to evolve related to using technology in the workplace. Managers and HRD professionals are tasked with ensuring that employees can meet organizational goals and objectives that are in sync with the emerging needs of a contemporary workforce. As the twenty-first century continues to evolve, managers and HRD professionals must remain current in strategies and practices that are effective in managing people. This chapter provides insight and suggestions to researchers on the current trends in the field that could benefit from further research.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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