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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Naveen Upreti, Raju G. Sunder, Narendra N. Dalei and Sandeep Garg

This paper aims to present a practical and sequential application of the theory of constraints (TOC) to eliminate the critical barriers to Indian power transmission system…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a practical and sequential application of the theory of constraints (TOC) to eliminate the critical barriers to Indian power transmission system (IPTS) that were limiting the entire power service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a well-known management technique known as TOC, which has the capability and positive force to eliminate the barrier through sequential managerial procedures. TOC framework can provide practical guidance to stakeholders of the power transmission sectors through situational assessment, conflict resolution, planning and implementing changes required in the IPTS.

Findings

This study explains the utility of five-steps thinking process (TP) of TOC especially in the IPTS sector. The study also describes how each step of TP can improve the performance of IPTS against its specified goal. The study brings management’s attention on the system’s weak links that must be leveraged by eliminating them from the system. Major types of constraints are related to the restrictive policy of the sector that mainly include lack of strategic planning, lack of investments and lesser participation of the private players in the IPTS. This study further identifies and suggests various strategies to eliminate the critical barriers of IPTS.

Originality/value

The five-step process of TOC has been successfully applied in manufacturing sector and service sector processes, such as banking and medical services. This paper has uniquely applied TOC in the area of power sector, which is considered as one of key service sectors that form an important share for the Indian economy.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Anil K. Sharma and Ashutosh Vashishtha

This article aims to examine the state of risk management in agriculture and power sector of India, evaluate the effectiveness of weather derivatives as alternative risk…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine the state of risk management in agriculture and power sector of India, evaluate the effectiveness of weather derivatives as alternative risk management tools and basic framework required to implement them.

Design/methodology/approach

Applications of traditional risk‐hedging tools and techniques in Indian agricultural and power sectors have proved to be costly, inadequate, and more importantly, a drag on the country's fiscal system. Mostly they offer a hedge against only the price risk. The volume related risk, which is rather more serious and highly weather‐dependent, remains practically unhedged. This study has used existing literature and empirical evidences for analyzing the various issues related to risk management in agriculture and power sector. Traditional derivative strategies have been used to construct weather derivatives contracts with different underlying weather indices.

Findings

The article suggests that how an appropriate weather‐based derivative contract system may be a more flexible, economical and sustainable way of managing the volume‐related weather risk in an economy, like India, having predominant agricultural and power sectors.

Originality/value

The article will be of value to all those who have some stakes in agricultural and power sectors of an economy and would like to mange the volume related risk in these sectors.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Michael Sony

Lean Six Sigma is a most widely used technique in quality management. In manufacturing and service industries, this technique is used for process excellence. In the power

Abstract

Purpose

Lean Six Sigma is a most widely used technique in quality management. In manufacturing and service industries, this technique is used for process excellence. In the power sector, there has been hardly any study on the usage of LSS. Can LSS transform the ailing power sector organization from frog into princes? The purpose of this paper is to explore LSS impact on the power sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach is followed. Five cases, one each from the generation, the transmission and three from distribution companies are studied based on the rationale of theoretical sampling.

Findings

LSS is an important methodology that can be used in generation, transmission and distribution of electricity energy to drive out inefficiency and improve customer satisfaction, profits, etc. In addition, the success stories of all five cases suggest the sustainable economic benefit to the organization due to the implementation of LSS.

Research limitations/implications

This study intends to make an academic contribution to the pertinence of LSS in the power sector. The multiple case study approach is used on a theoretical sample of power utilities in India. This study will provide the theoretical contribution for LSS. In addition, this study will help the practitioner and managers to effectively implement LSS, especially in the power sector.

Practical implications

This study can be used by power sector organizations to implement LSS. A special section on implication for practice is added so that organization can make use of it while implementing LSS in the power sector.

Originality/value

Power is one of the most important infrastructures for the development of a country. In a developing country, the power sector is ailing; the application of LSS can transform the power sector by driving out inefficiency, waste and variation. It will not only prove to be a boon to utilities, but it will also help the customer and society at large. Consequently, it will help in reducing the power tariff, which in turn will make power financially accessible to all categories of consumers. In addition, the private investment in this sector will also improve, if power sectors appeal, to financiers as an efficient organization, compared to loss-making one organization, at present.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Tareq Mahbub and Juthathip Jongwanich

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that deter firms from pursuing foreign direct investment (FDI) in Bangladesh’s power sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that deter firms from pursuing foreign direct investment (FDI) in Bangladesh’s power sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a mixed-method approach comprising semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. A quantitative analysis including a one-way analysis of variance and analytical hierarchy process is also included.

Findings

The results reveal that political aspects are the most influential barriers impeding FDI in the power sector, followed by economic and financial, societal and regulatory aspects. Of the individual factors, land acquisition/rent/lease, corruption, political interference, an inadequate gas transmission system and a long independent power producers’ approval process are key obstacles deterring FDI in the power sector. The ownership structure matters in ranking decisions to conduct FDI.

Practical implications

The study can assist managers in identifying key factors that deter FDI in the power sector. It can also assist the government to establish the right policies for the sustainable development of FDI in the power sector.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind in Bangladesh’s power sector that analyzes the key barriers hindering FDI systematically. It also discusses policies on removing these barriers for sustainable development of FDI in the power sector.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

A. Thillairajan and Monalisa Behera

Private equity (PE) has emerged as an important source of capital for infrastructure in recent years. There have been more than 2,000 deals by PE infrastructure funds till…

Abstract

Purpose

Private equity (PE) has emerged as an important source of capital for infrastructure in recent years. There have been more than 2,000 deals by PE infrastructure funds till 2012, with annual investments in the range of $100-120bn. Substantial proportion of these investments has been in the energy and the power sector. This paper aims to compare power generation projects with and without PE investment.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 148 power generation projects that were implemented in India during 2004-2011 were used for the analysis. Ordinary least squares and three-stage least squares regression have been used to analyze the impact of PE investment on unit project costs and project commissioning time.

Findings

Projects with PE investment had lower unit capacity costs as compared to power projects that did not have PE investment. This indicated the ability of PE investors to select, invest and develop those projects that are cost-effective. However, projects with PE investment had longer commissioning time. This can be attributed to the active monitoring and governance practices that were associated with PE investment.

Practical implications

The results highlight the key role that PE investors can play in power sector development in developing countries. Apart from providing capital to capital-starved economies, PE investors can help in developing cost-effective projects and contribute to sector development by institutionalizing robust processes and governance practices.

Originality/value

This is one of the earliest studies to analyze the impact of PE investment on the power sector.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Helga Kristjánsdóttir

The purpose of this paper is to seek a clearer understanding of how firms involved in power intensive industries participate in foreign direct investment. The paper asks…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek a clearer understanding of how firms involved in power intensive industries participate in foreign direct investment. The paper asks the following questions: how skilled are the employees available for hire? What kind of pollution restrictions will be applied to the plant? Is the infrastructure in place to enable free transport of the necessary materials? All of these are factors that can be analyzed on a national level, and are major factors in government policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is designated to explain how macro policy can be directed towards firms in the power intensive industry, to impact the competitiveness within the industry. Skilled labor differences is reflecting governmental policy in its willingness to contribute to education. Infrastructure can be viewed as an indicator for long‐term policy planning by the government. The pollution variable reflects on macro policy emphasis by governments, by presenting their emission targets. Investment cost variable gives indication of government policy concerning the ease with which foreign investors can enter into and invest in a particular country. The case country is Iceland, an isolated island that is unable to export its abundance directly and therefore must do so through foreign direct investment.

Findings

The findings indicate that source countries are attracted by the level of skill in Iceland at the beginning stage of operations when faced with fixed threshold cost. Once the plants have overcome fixed costs, there are positive impacts on marginal investment, the more skilled the source country is compared to the host. Other factors that proved to be important in this case study are distance, infrastructure, government stability, pollution quotas, and the fishing resource.

Originality/value

The relative friendliness a country's policies display towards an industry can make a huge difference when it comes to how successful a business can be, so studying these national‐level policies can help an individual determine what kind of direction to take on the day‐to‐day operational decisions.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

R.G.B. Fyffe

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of…

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Abstract

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of industrial and economic democracy, which centres around the establishment of a new sector of employee‐controlled enterprises, is presented. The proposal would retain the mix‐ed economy, but transform it into a much better “mixture”, with increased employee‐power in all sectors. While there is much of enduring value in our liberal western way of life, gross inequalities of wealth and power persist in our society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Amit Prakash Jha and Sanjay Kumar Singh

The Indian power sector is dominated by coal. Environmental awareness and advances in techno-economic front have led to a slow but steady shift towards greener…

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian power sector is dominated by coal. Environmental awareness and advances in techno-economic front have led to a slow but steady shift towards greener alternatives. The distributions of both fossil fuel resources and renewable energy potential are not uniform across the states. Paper attempts to answer how the states are performing in the sector and how the renewable energy and conventional resources are affecting the dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a two-stage data envelopment analysis (DEA) to rank the performance of Indian states in the power sector. Multi-stage analysis opens up the DEA black-box through disaggregating power sector in two logical sub-sectors. The performance is evaluated from the point-of-view of policy formulating and implementing agencies. Further, an econometric analysis using seemingly unrelated regression equations (SURE) is conducted to estimate the determinants of total and industrial per-capita electricity consumption.

Findings

Efficiency scores obtained from the first phase of analysis happens to be a significant explanatory variable for power consumption. The growth in electricity consumption, which is necessary for economic wellbeing, is positively affected by both renewable and non-renewable sources; but conventional sources have a larger impact on per-capita consumption. Yet, the share of renewables in the energy mix has positive elasticity. Hence, the findings are encouraging, because development in storage technologies, falling costs and policy interventions are poised to give further impetus to renewable sources.

Originality/value

The study is one of the very few where entire spectrum of the Indian power sector is evaluated from efficiency perspective. Further, the second phase analysis gives additional relevant insights on the sector.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Shabana Naveed and Aisha Azhar

With governance networks as the critical emerging feature of public administration, this article examines the structure, governance and challenges of networks in the…

Abstract

Purpose

With governance networks as the critical emerging feature of public administration, this article examines the structure, governance and challenges of networks in the public sector. Using complexity theory, this article explains that control-based relations do not hold much relevance to govern the complex systems of networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research design is employed taking the power network in Pakistan as the unit of analysis. Data were collected through eleven semi-structured interviews, companies' websites, government policy reports and other companies' reports. The structure of the power network was examined through the technique of social network analysis using UCINET. Thematic analysis of interviews was conducted with the help of NVivo 13 to identify the mode of governance and challenges.

Findings

The study found that five central public sector actors have a high degree centrality and betweenness centrality. Thematic analysis further revealed that these actors are controlling most of the decisions in the network in a hierarchical mode of governance. Other actors face multiple challenges including lack of autonomy, overlapping authorities, conflicting rules and complex decision processes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that instead of top-down and control-based relations, networks require self-governance mechanisms where actors independently participate and interact with other actors to generate common solutions to problems.

Practical implications

The authorities should use network management strategies, participatory approaches and consensus-building methods to reach decisions.

Originality/value

The study explores the network structure and network governance challenges in the context of a developing country that is barely addressed in the public management literature.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Moumita Acharyya and Tanuja Agarwala

The paper aims to understand the different motivations / reasons for engaging in CSR initiatives by the organizations. In addition, the study also examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to understand the different motivations / reasons for engaging in CSR initiatives by the organizations. In addition, the study also examines the relationship between CSR motivations and corporate social performance (CSP).

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from two power sector organizations: one was a private sector firm and the other was a public sector firm. A comparative analysis of the variables with respect to private and public sector organizations was conducted. A questionnaire survey was administered among 370 employees working in the power sector, with 199 executives from public sector and 171 from private sector.

Findings

“Philanthropic” motivation emerged as the most dominant CSR motivation among both the public and private sector firms. The private sector firm was found to be significantly higher with respect to “philanthropic”, “enlightened self-interest” and “normative” CSR motivations when compared with the public sector firms. Findings suggest that public and private sector firms differed significantly on four CSR motivations, namely, “philanthropic”, “enlightened self-interest”, “normative” and “coercive”. The CSP score was significantly different among the two power sector firms of public and private sectors. The private sector firm had a higher CSP level than the public sector undertaking.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies in the domain need to address differences in CSR motivations and CSP across other sectors to understand the role of industry characteristics in influencing social development targets of organizations. Research also needs to focus on demonstrating the relationship between CSP and financial performance of the firms. Further, the HR outcomes of CSR initiatives and measurement of CSP indicators, such as attracting and retaining talent, employee commitment and organizational climate factors, need to be assessed.

Originality/value

The social issues are now directly linked with the business model to ensure consistency and community development. The results reveal a need for “enlightened self-interest” which is the second dominant CSR motivation among the organizations. The study makes a novel contribution by determining that competitive and coercive motivations are not functional as part of organizational CSR strategy. CSR can never be forced as the very idea is to do social good. Eventually, the CSR approach demands a commitment from within. The organizations need to emphasize more voluntary engagement of employees and go beyond statutory requirements for realizing the true CSR benefits.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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