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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1972

Americus

Modern powder coatings were introduced in 1952. They created great interest and much was written about them and much predicted for them. They did indeed find a niche, but…

Abstract

Modern powder coatings were introduced in 1952. They created great interest and much was written about them and much predicted for them. They did indeed find a niche, but they did not deliver quite as had been anticipated and by the early 1960's their star was waning. But one must never discount the impact of advancing technology — particularly when economy, convenience and performance are involved. Novel methods of application, primarily electrostatic spraying to complement the original fluidised bed approach, new formulations, faster curing epoxies and a better understanding of both the virtues and the defects of this method for industrial coating, has brought powder coatings back into their own.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 1 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1973

G.E. Bond and J.N. Ralston

Many of you may already be familiar with the term ‘powder coating’. For those of you who are not, I would like to describe the term briefly. Powder coating is a relatively…

Abstract

Many of you may already be familiar with the term ‘powder coating’. For those of you who are not, I would like to describe the term briefly. Powder coating is a relatively new process by which dry plastic powders are applied to a clean metal surface. After application, the coated object is heated, fusing the powder to form a smooth, tough coating. Available today are many plastic powders offering a wide range of properties and colours. These powders are fully formulated and are free‐flowing ready for application to metal. Previous coatings for such items have been applied from solution. The dry plastic powders are normally higher molecular weight polymers than those used in solution: because of this, the coatings produced have greatly increased durability, toughness and abrasion resistance.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1976

Americus

More articles have been published about powder coating in the last two years than about any other phase of the protective coatings industry. From this almost overwhelming…

Abstract

More articles have been published about powder coating in the last two years than about any other phase of the protective coatings industry. From this almost overwhelming flurry of print, certain factors emerge. The first is that powder coating technology is certainly a valid and useful one. It has established itself as an integral contributor to the achievements of the protective coatings industry and, without doubt, it will be with us for many years to come. Its success is due to its many advantageous factors which have been reviewed many times in the past. Great strides have been made in that a highly versatile group of powders are now available with both thermoset and thermoplastic properties; it is possible to achieve thin coatings; and the savings in terms of effective powder usage have been well‐documented. Where there is overspray, equipment has been evolved for recycling. Stressed most often has been powder coating's contribution to a non‐polluting painting operation. Powder coating, on the other hand, does not solve the energy shortage problem since the coatings must be fused and baked. However, less energy is required than for solvent based coatings simply because the energy requirements associated with solvent removal are eliminated.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 5 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1972

ANTHONY J. KOURY, ALFEO A. CONTE JR and MARTIN J. DEVINE

POWDER coating technology has provided a means of applying resin coatings to substrates via processing techniques which have two distinct advantages over conventional…

Abstract

POWDER coating technology has provided a means of applying resin coatings to substrates via processing techniques which have two distinct advantages over conventional coating procedures. The first and probably most significant advantage from an ecological standpoint is the elimination of solvent carriers. The absence of solvents eliminates the emission of fumes and vapours thereby providing an environment that is virtually free of pollutants. Safety standards are also improved because the hazard of fire is substantially reduced.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 44 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1988

Erwin Bodnar and Paul Taylor

Over the last few years, the share of powder coatings used for the protection of aluminium extrusions and claddings for architectural uses in competition with conventional…

Abstract

Over the last few years, the share of powder coatings used for the protection of aluminium extrusions and claddings for architectural uses in competition with conventional liquid paints and as an alternative to anodising has sharply increased. In 1987, about 47 million m2 or 135 thousand tons of aluminium used in outdoor architecture have been powder coated in France, Germany, Italy and United Kingdom. This paper gives a thorough description of the latest developments of the polyester powder coating systems used for aluminium extrusions and claddings in Europe, underlining the criteria of the choice of the weathering resistant powders, the importance of metal pretreatment and of the coating process itself as well as of the quality control in this industry. A comparison with competitive coating technologies is also given.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Derek S.D. Norwood

In recent years aluminium has become a very widely used material in the construction industry. Light weight, good corrosion resistance and ease of fabrication lends itself…

Abstract

In recent years aluminium has become a very widely used material in the construction industry. Light weight, good corrosion resistance and ease of fabrication lends itself to a whole variety of end uses. Although the tendency for aluminium to oxidise in the atmosphere is itself a form of chemical “protection”, improvements in weather and chemical resistance can be gained from the use of a variety of surface coatings. These coating technologies are typically of the following types: polyvinylidine difluoride, water‐borne electro‐paint, conventional solvent‐based paints, powder coatings and anodising. The two most popular technologies in use today are: TGIC (Triglycidyl isocyanurate)/polyester powder coatings and polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) solvent‐based coatings. Coated aluminium has the added competition in the window frame and door frame market from uPVC. Only coated aluminium will be discussed in this paper.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1973

Americus

The Federation of Societies for Paint Technology authorised Levinson to do a study on powder coating, electrocoating and radiation. In an article [Journal of Paint

Abstract

The Federation of Societies for Paint Technology authorised Levinson to do a study on powder coating, electrocoating and radiation. In an article [Journal of Paint Technology, July (1972) p. 37] Levinson describes the advantages and disadvantages of powder coating, the technology involved, the economics of the various systems, the relationship to ecology, the manufacture of powders, the resins which are useful, and future trends.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1986

E. Bodnar and Paul Taylor

More than two decades after their frist start the thermosetting powder coatings became in 1985 a technically viable product and a commercial success. Powder coatings are…

Abstract

More than two decades after their frist start the thermosetting powder coatings became in 1985 a technically viable product and a commercial success. Powder coatings are 100% dry paints that contain no solvents. They are generally applied to metal substrates by means of electrostatic spray equipment that provides each powder particle with a small electric charge, which in turn makes it stick to the substrate. The coated objects then go into a high temperature oven (usualy 150 to 200°C), where the powder coating melts and reacts chemically while sintering together to a continuous smooth finish of a thermoset film.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 15 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Martin Stear and Martin Cooke

This article provides a summary of the Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) work over recent years to address occupational exposure to particulates during the manufacture…

Abstract

This article provides a summary of the Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) work over recent years to address occupational exposure to particulates during the manufacture and use of coating powders. It contends, in particular, that many users of coating powders are not controlling exposure to total inhalable particulate (TIP) (i.e. the total inhalable dust in the air from all sources), and that these control issues would exist even if TGIC (triglycidyl isocyanurate) was not being used. TGIC is a curing agent for polyester coating powders which is classified as a Category 2 mutagen. HSE is raising awareness that control of exposure is generally poor whatever powders are being used.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Fen Peng, Wensheng Liu, Yufeng Huang, Siwei Tang, Chaoping Liang and Yunzhu Ma

The purpose of this study is to develop a monolayer surface coating of stearic acid on Sn-Ag-Cu solder powder to limit oxidation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a monolayer surface coating of stearic acid on Sn-Ag-Cu solder powder to limit oxidation.

Design/methodology/approach

Stearic acid was adsorbed onto Sn-Ag-Cu solder powder through liquid-phase adsorption. The isotherm of adsorption was measured and then the microstructure of coated powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

Findings

The adsorption isotherm of stearic acid on the powder was “H” type, which revealed the layer-by-layer adsorption on non-porous surface. When the concentration of solution was in the range of 0.001-0.006 mol/L, with an adsorption amount of 0.12 ± 0.1 mg/g, monolayer stearic acid covered the solder powder completely. Uniform and integrated self-assembled monolayer coating was formed through hydrogen bonds between the oxygen ions in surface lattice of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder powder and the —O—H hydroxyl group of stearic acid. The maximum angle of stability of coated powder also reduced by 2.87° compared with that of non-coated powder. The increase rate of oxygen content of coated powder was much slower than that of non-coated powder when they were exposed to humid air.

Originality/value

As a result, oxidation of fine solder powder was effectively limited. Essentially, this method can also be applied to the coating of other types of solder powder and has reference significance to other coating by liquid-phase method.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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