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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Tina Vukasovič

In 2006 the world global poultry meat market was developing under the influence of shocks caused by the outbreak of the avian influenza which spread to the poultry meat…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2006 the world global poultry meat market was developing under the influence of shocks caused by the outbreak of the avian influenza which spread to the poultry meat market at the end of 2005. The virus affected the entire world poultry meat industry and thus visibly marked the world trade in poultry meat in 2006. This paper aims to investigate these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper concentrates on the results of the primary quantitative research which was carried out by using a method of individual personal interviews in a sample of n=2,452 poultry meat consumers, aged between 18 and 65 years and in the selected countries of Central and Eastern Europe (Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia). A positive perception of poultry meat was determined since the consumers in all three analyzed countries perceived it as tasty and healthy. Special attention was devoted to studying the importance of meat origin in a buying‐decision‐making process.

Findings

The trends in poultry meat consumption which were determined in the study of the European poultry meat market were thus confirmed with the quantitative research carried out in the selected countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Originality/value

The positive perception of poultry meat and the importance of its origin in the buying‐decision‐making process are evident in all the analyzed countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Christin Schipmann-Schwarze and Ulrich Hamm

The purpose of this paper is to identify drivers and barriers for the demand of organic poultry to provide recommendations for market actors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify drivers and barriers for the demand of organic poultry to provide recommendations for market actors.

Design/methodology/approach

644 consumers were interviewed through computer-assisted self-interviews in four regions (north, south, east and west) of Germany in front of conventional supermarkets and organic food shops. The survey data were analysed differentiating between three consumer segments. In addition to descriptive analysis, an explorative factor analysis was conducted and a multinomial logit model was applied.

Findings

The results show that consumer preferences, attitudes and determinants of purchase decisions differ significantly between consumer groups. Price sensitivity, appreciation of animal-welfare, belief in altruistic benefits of organic poultry production, as well as the influence of media reports are important determinants for the purchase decision of different consumer segments.

Practical implications

This study provides information for market actors regarding which strategies to adopt to increase the sales potential of organic poultry indifferent consumer segments.

Originality/value

The organic poultry market has great potential as it can meet the growing demand for healthy and sustainable products which are produced in an animal-friendly way. However, its market share still lies far below the overall organic market share for food products in total. Reasons for the low market share were not explored in-depth until now.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha, Mohammed Quaddus and Desmond Klass

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and to develop a sustainable model for the poultry industry in an attempt to mitigate existing socio-economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and to develop a sustainable model for the poultry industry in an attempt to mitigate existing socio-economic problems. Sustainability along with positive socio-economic changes has gained prominence in recent years in academia and business in Bangladesh. This paper aimed at helping the poultry industry is used to develop a sustainable production process to mitigate socio-economical problems. Bangladesh poultry has yet to achieve sustainability in her extended forward and reverse supply chain. The design science method under a quantitative paradigm has been used in this study to develop a sustainable supply chain model for the case industry. A simulation model has been developed using the SIMUL8 software package to model the real poultry case. Finally, key performance indicators (KPIs) will be briefly discussed to illustrate the positive effects of developing a sustainable production process model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study covers a literature review on environmental sustainability, reverse supply chain and Bangladesh poultry industry. This study adopted positivist ontology, empirical epistemology and quantitative methodology based on case studies of poultry industry. The design science methodology and case study method was chosen for this study. Design science is concerned with “devising artefacts to attain goals” (Simon, 1969). Design science is based on “build and evaluate” an artefact of a model (March and Smith, 1995). Here, an artefact means design and develop soft or hard objects that can meet specific purposes and goals (Venable, 2006a, 2006b). Case studies are observed descriptions of particular instance of an occurrence (Yin, 1994). Both primary and secondary information were used in this study.

Findings

The findings of this study were mainly focused on developing a sustainable poultry model along with Islamic consensus. There is plethora research work conducted by the previous researcher. Such study will fill the research gap that also can guide to eliminate socio-economic problems of the society. Model output can easily determine the immediate impact over society, stakeholders and entrepreneurs. Optimality can be observed in the model environment so that real-life experiment does not require which is also expensive and time consuming.

Research limitations/implications

The study only includes a sustainable poultry model with showing overall impact to mitigate the socio-economic problems in Bangladesh. This research can be extended more elaborately than this. Future research could be expanded based on different aspect of supply chain, Islamic finances and socio-economic problems.

Practical implications

Poultry waste management could gain more social, economic and environmental benefit through implementing the model practically within the existing farm.

Social implications

This paper provides a guidelines to create more employments and social benefits through sustainable poultry supply chain. Moreover, proper waste management can make it more worthy for the society.

Originality/value

This paper has maintained originality to mitigate socio-economic challenge in Bangladesh through sustainable poultry supply chain.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Meta Sterniša, Sonja Smole Možina, Sonja Levstek, Andreja Kukec, Peter Raspor and Mojca Jevšnik

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Slovenian consumers’ knowledge and self-reported practices in poultry meat handling during purchase, transport, and preparation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Slovenian consumers’ knowledge and self-reported practices in poultry meat handling during purchase, transport, and preparation in home kitchens and to assess the awareness of the microbiological risk associated with poultry meat, with an emphasis on Campylobacter.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study of consumers’ food safety knowledge, self-reported practices, and awareness of the microbiological risk was conducted from March to April 2015 at supermarkets in different parts of Slovenia. A convenience sample of 560 consumers was obtained. Gender and age distribution were controlled by 28 interviewers, each of whom distributed 20 questionnaires. The questionnaire included 33 questions divided into four parts.

Findings

The results revealed consumers awareness of food safety issues. Respondents have some basic knowledge about proper food handling. However, a substantial number of consumers still lacks knowledge of the microbiological risk and has bad habits in domestic poultry meat preparation.

Research limitations/implications

The research did not reflect a representative sample of Slovenian consumers.

Practical implications

The results indicate some gaps in consumers’ food safety knowledge and self-reported practices. Current Campylobacter preventive strategies regarding retail poultry meat contamination are not yet sufficiently successful.

Originality/value

The study provides valuable insight into consumers’ food safety knowledge and self-reported practices in poultry meat handling from shopping to eating. Opportunities for improvement in consumers’ formal and informal education and training should be offered.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1976

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in…

Abstract

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in poultry slaughterhouses, cutting‐up premises, &c, appears to be resolved at last. (The Prayer lodged against the Regulations when they were formally laid before Parliament just before the summer recess, which meant they would have to be debated when the House reassembled, could have resulted in some delay to the early operative dates, but little chance of the main proposals being changed.) The controversy began as soon as the EEC draft directive was published and has continued from the Directive of 1971 with 1975 amendments. There has been long and painstaking study of problems by the Ministry with all interested parties; enforcement was not the least of these. The expansion and growth of the poultry meat industry in the past decade has been tremendous and the constitution of what is virtually a new service, within the framework of general food inspection, was inevitable. None will question the need for efficient inspection or improved and higher standards of hygiene, but the extent of the organization in the first and the enormous cost of structural and other alterations to premises in the second, were seen as formidable tasks, and costly. The execution and enforcement of the new Regulations is assigned to local authorities (District, Metropolitan and London Borough Councils), who are empowered to make charges for inspection, licences, etc., to recoup the full costs of administration. The Government had previously promised that the cost of this new service, which when fully operative, will be significant, would not fall upon the already over‐burdened economies of local authorities. The figure of a penny per bird is given; in those areas with very large poultry processing plants, with annual outputs counted in millions of birds, this levy should adequately cover costs of enforcing the Regulations, but there are many areas with only one of a few small concerns with annual killings of perhaps no more than 200,000 birds—this much we know from perusing annual health reports received at the offices of this Journal—and the returns from charges will certainly be inadequate to cover the cost of extra staff. The Regulations require the appointment of “official veterinary surgeons” and “poultry meat inspectors”, both new to local government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Shumei Chen

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a comparative study on the transatlantic similarities and dissimilarities in the USA's and the EU's poultry trade disputes with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a comparative study on the transatlantic similarities and dissimilarities in the USA's and the EU's poultry trade disputes with China, as a case study of murky protectionism amid the current global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The case history is explored chronologically, supported with relevant legal documents. For comparative purposes, the poultry trade profiles concerning these trade partners are overviewed before the case study.

Findings

The paper concludes from the case study that there is a great deal of synchronicity between the murky protectionism and the current global crisis within the current WTO framework, due to both pressures faced by some governments from inside and the inherent limitations of the WTO agreements and dispute settlement mechanism. Comparatively, the EU's approach to poultry dispute with China is more scientific, while the USA's is more political.

Research limitations/implications

As the Sino‐US poultry dispute is still outstanding, pending for the panel's report, the findings are interim, and the implications only tentative. In short, the lessons learnt from this comparative case study is that unilateral capacity building might be the only concrete thing Chinese exporters and authorities can do at present stage under the current WTO legal framework, amid the tidal wave of the current global crisis.

Originality/value

The paper examines trade disputes over the same commodity China involved with two pivotal trade partners, in order to explore underlying differences; and lessons drawn for China.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Nicholas Oppong Mensah, Ernest Christlieb Amrago, Jeffery Kofi Asare, Frank Osei Tutu and Anthony Donkor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the poultry farmer's willingness to pay for agricultural tax in the Dormaa Municipality of Ghana. Besides, the study analysed the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the poultry farmer's willingness to pay for agricultural tax in the Dormaa Municipality of Ghana. Besides, the study analysed the mean agricultural tax and constraints impeding the payment of the agricultural tax.

Design/methodology/approach

One hundred (100) poultry farmers were selected for the study. The logit and Kendall’s coefficient of concordance were used to examine the factors that influence payment of agricultural tax and the constraints impeding the payment of the agricultural tax, respectively.

Findings

Instructively, 83% of the respondents were interested in the regressive taxation model relative to 12 and 5% who were interested in the proportional and progressive taxation model, respectively. The empirical results of the logit model revealed that tax awareness, probability of being audited and public service provision of roads influenced the poultry farmer's decision to pay for the agricultural tax. Perception of corruption and high tax rates were the primary constraints impeding the payment of the agricultural tax. The results further revealed that the farmers are willing to pay an average maximum amount of Ghc 152.00 (US 26 dollars) agricultural tax per month.

Originality/value

Despite the increasing relevance of agricultural tax, studies on poultry farmer's willingness to pay agricultural tax have been scarce in West Africa, particularly, Ghana. As a consequence, this paper broadens the frontiers of the existing literature on agricultural tax as well as the constraints impeding the poultry farmers to pay agricultural tax.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

T. Sridevi Dhanarani, C. Shankar, P. Prakash, T. K. Poornima Priyadharshani and K. Thamaraiselvi

The purpose of this paper is to minimize environmental problems related to raw poultry manure application by stabilizing its nutrient and organic matter (OM) content. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to minimize environmental problems related to raw poultry manure application by stabilizing its nutrient and organic matter (OM) content. This can be achieved by prior digestion before its application to agricultural soils.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present study, changes in physicochemical and microbial properties of poultry litter were studied in order to evaluate the suitability of using the digested (stabilized) product for soil amendment. The poultry litter was digested in autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestor (ATAD) where organic solids were degraded and the heat released during the microbial degradation was used to maintain the thermophilic temperatures ( < 50ºC) at a hydraulic retention time of about 3 d.

Findings

Results of this study showed that the poultry litter undergoes physicochemical and microbial changes similar to other digestion systems; these changes include self-heating, relative increase in Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, P, K and NO3-N and decrease in microbial population numbers, C, OM and NH4-N contents.

Originality/value

ATAD is an effective method for the conversion of poultry litter into organic fertilizer, which can be readily applied to the agriculture land. ATAD is an eco-friendly, cost effective method which also reduces the length of stabilization.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Kadri Koppel, Loreida Timberg, Roman Shalimov, Laura Vázquez-Araújo, Angel A. Carbonell-Barracchina, Brizio Di Donfrancesco and Edgar Chambers IV

Foodborne illnesses are often related to raw and cooked poultry and meat, eggs, and their products. Consumer practices related to these foods have been studied in many…

Abstract

Purpose

Foodborne illnesses are often related to raw and cooked poultry and meat, eggs, and their products. Consumer practices related to these foods have been studied in many countries, however, little comparison has been made among different countries. The purpose of this paper is to characterize consumers’ purchase, storage, handling, and preparation of poultry products and eggs in four European countries: Russia, Estonia, Italy, and Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

Approximately 100 selected consumers in each location completed a questionnaire that included sections about poultry products and eggs purchase temperatures and locations, storage locations such as refrigerator, freezer, or cabinet, and preparation such as washing eggs and poultry before cooking, and the use of cutting boards.

Findings

Although educating consumers in European countries is common, some food safety aspects may need to be additionally addressed. The results indicated differences in purchase and storage practices of raw eggs. In Russia and Estonia consumers who participated in the study purchased both refrigerated and room temperature eggs whereas in Italy (84 percent) and Spain (87 percent) eggs typically were purchased at room temperature. However, almost all consumers in all countries stored eggs in the refrigerator. In Russia 70 percent of the consumers who participated in the study immediately froze raw meat, poultry, or seafood after purchase; while in other countries about a quarter of the consumers froze the raw meat.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited by the number of respondents in each country that does not allow extrapolation of results.

Originality/value

Food preparation practices revealed behavior that supports cross-contamination during cooking, such as washing raw poultry and eggs. A uniform approach to food safety practices related research, such as presented in this study, would help define overlapping critical points in consumer behavior and create educational messages based on the information gathered.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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