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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Faqir M. Anjum, Imran Pasha, Sarfraz Ahmad, M. Issa Khan and Zafar Iqbal

The present study was designed to enhance the nutritional and calorific value of food without affecting quality of final product with the use of emulsifiers. Lysine…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study was designed to enhance the nutritional and calorific value of food without affecting quality of final product with the use of emulsifiers. Lysine contents in potatoes are similar to animal protein and its flour can be utilized to overcome protein and calorie malnutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

Composite flours were prepared by substituting wheat flour with potato flour at 20 per cent, with guar gum 3 per cent and GMS at 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0. The blends were subject to proximate analysis and calorific value determination. Naan prepared from composite flours were evaluated by panel of judges to access suitable level of supplementation.

Findings

Statistical analysis revealed significant decrease in moisture, protein, crude fiber while increase in the fat content of composite flour. Replacement of wheat flour by potato flour has non significant effect on the ash and carbohydrates contents nitrogen free extract (NFE). Moisture, protein and fat contents decreased significantly with the passage of time during storage while crude fiber, ash content and NFE were found to be non‐significantly affected by duration of storage. Potato flour at 20 per cent level of substitution along with 3 per cent guar gum and 0.6 per cent GMS was found to be acceptable by panel of judges having maximum acceptability of naan.

Practical implications

Potato flour supplementation can be done through roller flour mills or small scale grinders (chakki) to enhance the value of flour to be used by masses in order to overcome the protein malnutrition as quantity of potato flour protein is comparable to animal protein.

Originality/value

Presently potatoes are consumed as vegetable and during peak season processed into flour, starch and dried products. Potato flour is rarely used for the production of baked products in Pakistan. Potatoes are rich in starch, vitamin B1, and vitamin B2, ash content, fiber content and essential amino acids as compared to cereals. Thus potato flour can utilized to improve the energy status of masses. Research conducted was unique in its nature as effect of both storage periods was evaluated and the suitable levels of replacement of potato flour were investigated.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Andrew Fearne

Outlines the factors affecting food choice. Analysis of NationalFood Survey data illustrates the importance of non‐economic factorsaffecting the demand for potatoes and…

Abstract

Outlines the factors affecting food choice. Analysis of National Food Survey data illustrates the importance of non‐economic factors affecting the demand for potatoes and potato products. Discusses the results of a consumer survey conducted in the Spring of 1991. Diet and health are identified as the key attitudinal factors affecting potato demand, while work status, age, household composition and socio‐economic group are the main consumer characteristics which appear to influence both purchasing behaviour and usage.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Assem Abu Hatab and Yves Surry

A better understanding of the determinants of demand through accurate estimates of the elasticity of import demand can help policymakers and exporters improve their market…

Abstract

Purpose

A better understanding of the determinants of demand through accurate estimates of the elasticity of import demand can help policymakers and exporters improve their market access and competitiveness. This study analyzed the EU's demand for imported potato from major suppliers between 1994 and 2018, with the aim to evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an import-differentiated framework to investigate demand relationships among the major potato suppliers to the EU's. To evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato on the EU market, expenditure and price demand elasticities for various suppliers were calculated and compared.

Findings

The empirical results indicated that as income allocation of fresh potatoes increases, the investigated EU markets import more potatoes from other suppliers compared to imports from Egypt. The results show that EU importers may switch to potato imports from other suppliers as the import price of Egyptian potatoes increases, which enter the EU markets before domestically produced potatoes are harvested.

Research limitations/implications

Due to data unavailability, the present study relied on yearly data on quantities and prices of EU potato imports. A higher frequency of observations should allow for considering seasonal effects, and thereby providing a more transparent picture of market dynamics and demand behavior of EU countries with respect to potato import from various sources of origin.

Originality/value

The study used a system-wide and source differentiated approach to analyze import demand. In particular, the empirical approach allowed for comparing different demand models (AIDS, Rotterdam, NBR and CBS) to filter out the superior and most suitable model for that data because the suitability and performance of a demand model depends rather on data than on universal criteria.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2016

Bart Minten, Thomas Reardon, Sunipa Das Gupta, Dinghuan Hu and K. A. S. Murshid

Wastage and post-harvest losses in food value chains are becoming increasingly debated and policies are being increasingly designed to reduce food wastages. Despite its…

Abstract

Purpose

Wastage and post-harvest losses in food value chains are becoming increasingly debated and policies are being increasingly designed to reduce food wastages. Despite its presumed importance, there is large variation in the importance and type of food losses and wastage. We identify the levels of food wastage at various levels of the potato food chain for three Asian countries.

Methodology/approach

Surveys were fielded to better measure the important variation between value chain agents, to capture wastage at each level, to analyze the structure of the value chain, and to evaluate wastage over the whole value chain (except for consumption). We generate data on an important staple in these countries and analyze the importance of waste in domestic rural-urban food value chains, often the most important value chain in these countries.

Findings

We find total quantities of potatoes wasted are equal to 5.2% in the harvest period and 6.4% in the off-season of all quantities that enter the value chain for Bangladesh. Even lower numbers are obtained in India (3.2% and 3.3%, respectively). These wastage levels are higher in China, possibly because of the significantly longer distances that potatoes are shipped.

Practical implications

The use of cold storage facilities can minimize the level of wastage in the potato distribution chain. Studies of this type of storage for other countries and commodities can identify opportunities in which adoption of cold storage can provide the greatest contributions toward the elimination of food wastage.

Details

Food Security in a Food Abundant World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-215-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Samuel Ayofemi Adeyeye and John O. Akingbala

This study aims to assess the quality characteristics and acceptability of cookies from sweet potato–maize flour blends and to determine nutritional quality, color and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the quality characteristics and acceptability of cookies from sweet potato–maize flour blends and to determine nutritional quality, color and palatability traits and to compare the effects with that of wheat cookies, so as to suggest a cost-effective production method to bakers and retailers. This would ensure food security, enhanced health, combat malnutrition problems and improve the production of the crops.

Design/methodology/approach

Cookies were prepared by the method reported by Okaka and Isieh (1990), Abayomi et al. (2013), Onabanjo and Ighere (2014) with modification. Flour (200 g) from each sample of different flour blends was used for the experiment. Sugar (80 g) was creamed with margarine (100 g) until light and fluffy constituency was obtained using Kenwood chef with initial minimum speed, and the speed increased stepwise until the mark of 6 on the chef indicator was attained. Whole egg (60 g) was added, then followed by flour (200 g), powdered milk (20 g), baking powder (0.1 g) and salt (1 g) were added and mixed until a stiff paste (batter) was obtained. The batter was rolled on a floured board using a rolling pin to a thickness of 0.2-0.3 cm. The rolled batter was cut into circular shapes with a cutter and arranged on a greased tray and baked at 1500°C for 20 minutes. The cookies were brought out, cooked and packaged in cellophane bag until used for laboratory analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that substitution of sweet potato flour with maize flour significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the protein from 6.8-4.4 per cent, moisture from 5.3-5.0 per cent, crude fibre from 3.4-2.5 per cent and fat from 9.8-8.5 per cent of the composite flours and the cookies. The ash and sugar contents were increased from 4.3-5.8 per cent for ash and 2.1-3.9 per cent for sugar with increase in sweet potato flour substitution. The calorific value of the cookies decreased from 457-397 cal/100 g as the percentage of sweet potato flour increased in the maize flour cookies. Sensory evaluation results showed that the colour, texture, taste and overall acceptability changed significantly (p < 0.05) with increase in sweet potato flour substitution. The optimum substitution level was 40 per cent; above this, the product becomes less acceptable to the consumer.

Research limitations/implications

Fabrication and production processing machines that use sweet potato will be a great challenge.

Originality/value

This research is of value to the bakery industry or retailers. The optimum substitution level of sweet potato flour was 40 per cent, and it appears to be a promising measure from the view of practicability. The relative ease of getting sweet potato flour makes it superior to other imported flour like wheat and in reducing cost of importation of wheat to Nigeria.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

Richard Faulks

When the potato gained popular acceptance as a food item in the UK about 200 years ago it quickly became, and has remained, a major component of the diet. The reasons for…

Abstract

When the potato gained popular acceptance as a food item in the UK about 200 years ago it quickly became, and has remained, a major component of the diet. The reasons for its popularity are both agronomic and culinary. The potato is easily cultivated in our temperate climate and gives good yields even if harvested immature in summer, as often happened, to fill the gap between cereal harvests. The potato has a natural dormant period which allows it to be stored through the winter months when other fresh vegetables are in short supply. It lends itself readily to a wide range of cooking methods of which the most common are chipped, boiled, mashed, roast and baked, although it can also be made into flour and used to replace or extend wheat flour in certain baked foods. So well established has the potato become that it is now difficult to envisage a hot cooked meal without potatoes — despite the popularity and convenience of pastas and rice.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 81 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2009

Christine Hoefkens, Isabelle Vandekinderen, Bruno De Meulenaer, Frank Devlieghere, Katleen Baert, Isabelle Sioen, Stefaan De Henauw, Wim Verbeke and John Van Camp

The increasing demand for organic foods is explained mainly by consumers' concerns about the quality and safety of foods and their perception that organically produced…

2395

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing demand for organic foods is explained mainly by consumers' concerns about the quality and safety of foods and their perception that organically produced foods are healthier and safer than conventional foods. Based on internationally available concentration data of organic and conventional vegetables (carrots, tomatoes, lettuce and spinach) and potatoes, the paper aims to investigate the scientific validity of nutrition claims as “no vegetable/potato has higher amounts of nutrient X than organic vegetables/potatoes” and “no vegetable/potato has lower amounts of contaminant Y than organic vegetables/potatoes”.

Design/methodology/approach

Detailed nutrient and contaminant databases were developed for organic and conventional vegetables separately. Non‐parametric (Mann‐Whitney test) methods were used to detect significant differences between both types of vegetables. A chi‐square test was used to compare the incidence of pesticide residues in organic and conventional vegetables.

Findings

From a nutritional and toxicological point of view, organic vegetables and potato in general are not significantly better than conventional vegetables and potatoes. For some nutrients and contaminants organic vegetables and potatoes score significantly better but for others they score significantly worse. Therefore, it becomes difficult to justify general claims indicating a surplus value of organic over conventional vegetables and potatoes. More data from controlled paired studies are needed to reconsider the use of claims for these organic plant foods in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Only a limited number of studies comparing the nutrient and/or contaminant concentration of organic and conventional vegetables are available (“paired studies”). Additionally, the majority of the studies are of moderate or poor quality. The implication is that more of those paired studies are heavily needed. Another limitation of the study is the fact that most pesticide residue data originated from the USA, the EU and Australia.

Originality/value

So far only few studies compared both nutrient and contaminant contents between organic and conventional plant foods. This paper covers therefore an important, not well‐explored research sub area.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Demelash Hailu Mitiku, Solomon Abera, Nugusse Bussa and Tilahun Abera

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of partial substitution of wheat flour with sweet potato flour on the nutrient composition and sensory properties of bread.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of partial substitution of wheat flour with sweet potato flour on the nutrient composition and sensory properties of bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Sweet potato flour was blended with wheat flour at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 percent levels of substitution for bread production. Proximate, minerals and antinutritional factors of the breads were investigated using AOAC methods. Sensory evaluation was carried out by a panel of 50 consumers. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and means were separated by Tukey’s comparison test at p <0.05. Results were reported as mean ± SD.

Findings

The nutritional and sensory quality of bread made from wheat flour supplemented with sweet potato flour at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 percent was investigated. Blending of sweet potato flour with wheat flour had significantly decreased the protein content (4.76–7.78 percent) while the ash (1.35–3.07 percent), crude fiber (0.24–1.03), carbohydrate contents (88.39–90.45 percent), iron, zinc, phosphorus and vitamin A contents were significantly increased ( p<0.05) with increasing sweet potato flour in the formulations. The tannin and phytate contents of the composite breads were low. Sensory evaluation of the breads revealed a mild reduction of the bread’s general acceptability with increase in the substitution level by sweet potato flour.

Originality/value

This study showed that the wheat flour used in making breads could be substituted with up to 15 percent sweet potato flour without compromising its nutritional quality, with only a mild reduction in sensory quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Demelash Hailu Mitiku and Tilahun Abera Teka

The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient and antinutrient content of two improved sweet potato varieties released for drought prone areas of eastern Ethiopia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient and antinutrient content of two improved sweet potato varieties released for drought prone areas of eastern Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

Matured roots of two sweet potato varieties, namely, Berkume and Adu, were collected from Haramaya University, Toni Research Farm, Ethiopia. The sweet potatoes were ground into flour following standard procedure. Thereafter, proximate, dietary minerals and β-carotene were determined by official methods of analysis. The tannin and phytate contents were determined by colorimetric methods.

Findings

The moisture, protein, fat, fiber, ash, utilizable carbohydrate and gross energy varied from 6.23-6.61 per cent, 2.07-2.76 per cent, 1.25-1.52 per cent, 1.04-1.16 per cent, 3.38- 5.32 per cent, 90.03-91.45 per cent and 382.18-388.07 Kcal/100 g in both the sweet potato varieties. Potassium content (176.17 mg/100 g) was reported to be the highest and registered in Berkume variety, while the lowest mineral content (2.18 mg/100 g) determined was zinc in Adu sweet potato variety. The highest total carotenoid content (3.39mg/100 g) was recorded in Berkume sweet potato variety. The tannin and phytic acid contents ranged from 9.98 to 12.94 mg/100 g and from 0.24 to 0.31 mg/100 g in Berkume and Adu sweet potato varieties, respectively.

Originality/value

This study showed that the Berkume sweet potato variety has high nutritional potential and less antinutrient contents as compared with the nutritional value of many other roots and tuber crops documented in the FAO database and hence can contribute to reducing malnutrition in resource-poor settings of Ethiopia. Further work needs to be carried out on developing value-added products from Berkume sweet potato variety for its extensive utilization.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mark MacPherson, Steven Dukeshire, Gefu Wang‐Pruski and Vivek Varma

The North American fresh potato market has been in decline for over ten years, yet little consumer research has penetrated beyond the factors influencing the purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The North American fresh potato market has been in decline for over ten years, yet little consumer research has penetrated beyond the factors influencing the purchase decision. The purpose of this study is to provide a deeper understanding of the purchase decision for the fresh potato by exploring the linkages between the choice tactics employed in the store, post‐purchase evaluations in the home and the value orientations motivating consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, semi‐structured focus groups were conducted and analyzed using framework analysis.

Findings

This study presents a choice tactic formation and refinement model for the fresh potato that illustrates a feedback process between in‐home evaluations of the fresh potato and the four choice tactics employed at the point of purchase (potato size, color, shape and size uniformity). Each evaluative outcome related back to one of three value orientations (taste, health and lifestyle). Only two of the value orientations (taste and lifestyle) were found to be influencing the formation and refinement of these choice tactics. Positive and negative evaluative outcomes were also found to be dependent on whether participants thought of the potato as either fresh or prepared.

Originality/value

Detailed insights into a feedback process between in‐home evaluations of the fresh potato and the choice tactics employed at the point of purchase.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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