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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Pekka Laukkanen, Suvi Sinkkonen and Tommi Laukkanen

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of innovation resistance by dividing internet banking non‐adopters into three groups based on their intentions to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of innovation resistance by dividing internet banking non‐adopters into three groups based on their intentions to use the innovation. Thereafter, the aim is to identify how the resistance differs in these customer groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies three groups of internet banking non‐adopters, namely postponers, opponents and rejectors. The data were collected by conducting an extensive postal survey among the retail banking customers in Finland who had not adopted internet banking. The measurement development was based on consumer resistance theory and the earlier literature on internet banking. Principal component analysis was used to classify the resistance items into five adoption barriers derived from the earlier literature. Thereafter, analysis of variance was used to analyse the statistical differences in resistance to internet banking between the three groups.

Findings

Significant differences were identified between the groups explored. The resistance of the rejectors is much more intense and diverse than that of the opponents, while the postponers show only slight resistance. The results also indicate that psychological barriers are even higher determinants of resistance than usage and value, which are constructs related to ease‐of‐use and usefulness determining acceptance in the traditional technology acceptance model. Moreover, the findings highlight the role of self‐efficacy in bank customers' risk perceptions to internet banking.

Originality/value

This study provides further understanding of what inhibits internet banking adoption by comparing three non‐adopter groups with respect to their resistance to internet banking. It also has implications for management in overcoming non‐adopters' resistance to the innovation.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Nabil Mzoughi and Wafa M’Sallem

This research aims to describe three profile segments (postponers, opponents and rejectors) of non‐adopters of internet banking in Tunisia, and attempts to predict…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to describe three profile segments (postponers, opponents and rejectors) of non‐adopters of internet banking in Tunisia, and attempts to predict consumers’ willingness to adopt this new technology using a range of factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical background was mainly based on dispositional resistance to change theory, as well as previous literature on internet banking. A total of 595 surveys were collected via face‐to‐face interviews. In order to predict consumers’ intentions, selective factors were proposed (i.e. perceived usefulness, perceived risk, dispositional resistance to change, demographics). Data was assessed through multinomial logistic regression.

Findings

Significant differences were observed between the three segments (postponers, opponents and rejectors) on the basis of the proposed predictors. Moreover, dispositional resistance to change as a personality trait plays a significant role in behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

Dispositional resistance to change as a personality trait is still underdeveloped in marketing research studies. This paper provides managerial recommendations for Tunisian bank practitioners to better profile their targets.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Ivett Szalma and Judit Takács

We chose to analyse Hungarian childlessness in order to map whether there is any voluntary childlessness at all in a society which is characterised by strong traditional…

Abstract

We chose to analyse Hungarian childlessness in order to map whether there is any voluntary childlessness at all in a society which is characterised by strong traditional family values and the widely accepted social norm that everyone should become a parent.

To answer to this question, we applied both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, we analysed the first three waves of the Hungarian panel survey ‘Turning Points of the Life Course’ conducted in 2001, 2004 and 2008. The focus is on men and women who were childless in 2001 and were still childless in 2008. To have a better understanding of the background of the quantitative results, we have also analysed 55 life-history interviews conducted with heterosexual men and women, who were recruited by using chain-referral sampling.

According to the qualitative findings the categorisation of childless people is quite fluid. For example, postponers became definitely childless while some originally voluntarily childless respondents became parents. However, the qualitative analysis allowed us to understand the mechanism behind this. In addition, using mixed methods also highlighted some inconsistencies between the qualitative and quantitative results.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Voluntary and Involuntary Childlessness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-362-1

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Deepak Chawla and Himanshu Joshi

The purpose of this paper is to identify which factors influence mobile banking adoption and examine those factors for segmentation, using a sample of Indian consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify which factors influence mobile banking adoption and examine those factors for segmentation, using a sample of Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 59 statements were identified based on a literature review, focus group discussions and personal interviews. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify the relevant factors. An online survey of 367 mobile phone users in India was conducted. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling. Appropriate statistical techniques (hierarchical cluster analysis, k-means cluster analysis) were used to segment the users. A profile of each segment was developed based on demographics, mobile banking services used, and attitude and intentions toward mobile banking. Further, a post hoc test was used to test the variation between the obtained clusters and user attitudes and intentions toward mobile banking. The demographic characteristics of users within each cluster were also examined.

Findings

Mobile users were segmented into three clusters based on their perceptions of various factors influencing mobile banking. These segments were labeled as technology adoption (TA) leaders, TA followers and TA laggards. The results show that both attitude and intentions toward mobile banking significantly differs across the three segments. In terms of relative positioning, TA leaders have the most favorable attitudes and intentions followed by TA followers, and TA laggards. Age was found to significantly influence TA and usage.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study are based on responses from young, educated and salaried Indian consumers from large metro cities. Therefore, it is important to include respondents from smaller cities and towns to be able to generalize the findings. The sample is skewed toward users having accounts with private banks and hence, a balanced representation of respondents from public and private sector banks would help in identifying gaps pertaining to each sector. In future research, attempting to compare the results with other developing and developed countries may be beneficial.

Practical implications

The results offer service providers better knowledge about typical mobile banking user segments, providing banks with ideas for customizing their services to meet customer expectations.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into factors that influence mobile banking adoption in India, which has not been investigated. In contrast to earlier studies conducted on internet banking, this study attempts to examine the perceptions, attitudes and intentions of mobile users. Although traditional TA models and theories of technology diffusion have been used, this study attempts to tailor the model specifically for mobile banking.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Penny Mansfield

Concern with demographic prediction and projection has ensured a wide variety of studies of family building. These studies range from large‐scale surveys of fertility…

Abstract

Concern with demographic prediction and projection has ensured a wide variety of studies of family building. These studies range from large‐scale surveys of fertility patterns to a number of in‐depth investigations of pregnancy, childbirth and parenthood. The former include cross‐sectional cohort surveys of fertility expectations, attitudes to family planning and contraceptive behaviours, where detailed reproductive histories have been obtained from a wide range of respondents and analysed by cohorts, based on the year of birth or age of marriage of the informant. However, a major defect in these surveys lies in the collection of accurate retrospective data, for example a middle aged married women having to give an account of her behaviour and/or attitudes when she first married twenty years earlier. The remedy suggested by Ryder and Westhoff is ‘to use comparable classification procedure in a longitudinal study, collecting data periodically from the same families as they progress through their family life cycles. Several such longitudinal surveys have been undertaken and they provide a more detailed picture of the process of family building. This concern with the dynamic aspects of having children is reflected in the more qualitative micro‐studies of pregnancy, childbirth and parenthood.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Peter F. Mason

Highlights that in spite of the notion generally held, that consumer durables are luxuries, the market displays some inertia comparable to that of non‐durables. Proposes…

Abstract

Highlights that in spite of the notion generally held, that consumer durables are luxuries, the market displays some inertia comparable to that of non‐durables. Proposes that new analysis of the structure of the consumer‐durable markets leads to the concept that they have basic strengths that can only be temporarily violated. Distinguishes further between individual initial sales and statistical initial sales, also between individual replacement sales and statistical replacement sales. Closes by stating that consumers are not really affected by economic conditions, except in so far as they may postpone their purchases – particularly in the replacement sector.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Anna Gotlib

In this chapter, I consider how voluntarily childless (VC) women can respond not just to master narratives of mandatory motherhood, but to their own internalised…

Abstract

In this chapter, I consider how voluntarily childless (VC) women can respond not just to master narratives of mandatory motherhood, but to their own internalised narratives of wantonness – of not desiring something they ought, or of being ambivalent about motherhood altogether. This chapter, then, is about the practices of choosing and endorsing one’s desires, however clear or ambiguous, about intentional childlessness, and in the process, of learning to hold oneself as a valued moral agent, as a dissident, but non-wanton, self. Secondarily, it is also about challenging Frankfurt’s claims that the formation and maintenance of moral identities require a kind of wholeheartedness that admits of no doubts. First, I begin with a personal story of my struggles with desiring my choices – of coming to endorse, however not-wholeheartedly, my non-wanting of motherhood, and thus rejecting the pronatalist narratives that marked my first-order desires as mistaken, and my second-order ones as deviant. Second, I offer an overview of voluntary childlessness as experienced by women most pressured to reproduce in the context of the bad moral luck of pronatalism. I note that my approach, grounded in philosophical feminist value theory, is focused on women who are not involuntarily childless or infertile, and who, because of social, economic and other privilege find themselves to be the targets of pronatalist narratives of ‘desirable’ motherhood. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of the dissident practices of identity-creation through which women can embrace both their certainties and ambiguities about their VC status by offering counterstories in response to accusations of wanton-hood, or of improperly, unnaturally or heretically motivated wills.

Details

Voluntary and Involuntary Childlessness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-362-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gonzalo Díaz Meneses and Asunción Beerli Palacio

The objective of this research is not only to provide a new theoretical framework to overcome doctrinal inconsistencies related to the reward recycling technique but also…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is not only to provide a new theoretical framework to overcome doctrinal inconsistencies related to the reward recycling technique but also to empirically contrast the proposed explanations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a quasi‐experimental design. This type of treatment comprises the application of a draw‐based prize technique. A questionnaire was issued to gather the information from a sample with 123 individuals. The approach is quantitative.

Findings

It was found that recycling behaviour has become a routine or habit with recognized awareness of ecology and recycling, but without a high level of involvement, since today's adoption process does not require such effort. This implies that the efficacy of the reward technique has been transformed and consequently its effects must be understood differently. To be specific, responders and non‐responders are similar, in terms of their levels of beliefs about recycling, ecological concern and involvement with recycling, and both show the same model of adoption with a low hierarchy of effect and with a few minor differences. Nevertheless there is only one difference between sustainers and non‐sustainers, namely, the sustainers’ greater ecological concern before the promotion application.

Research limitations/implications

The non‐existence of a control group is a limitation with the result that the validity of the experiment is not being totally checked.

Originality/value

This research provides some empirical evidence challenging some old presumptions concerning the understanding of recycling.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Steven Pressman

Argues that while an expenditure tax would increase the complexityand administrative burdens of taxation, these problems are notoverwhelming. The problems which have led…

Abstract

Argues that while an expenditure tax would increase the complexity and administrative burdens of taxation, these problems are not overwhelming. The problems which have led others to conclude that an expenditure tax is infeasible, or would result in gross inequities, are not insuperable. At worst they can be handled with a little ingenuity and a suitable transition scheme. The case for or against an expenditure tax must rest on whether the economic benefits of adopting such a tax exceed the minor administrative costs of the tax. The expenditure tax cannot be rejected as infeasible merely because of practical or administrative problems.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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