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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2010

Britt-Marie Stålnacke

Psychological factors such as post-traumatic stress and depression may play an important role in the recovery after whiplash injuries. Difficulties in psychosocial…

Abstract

Psychological factors such as post-traumatic stress and depression may play an important role in the recovery after whiplash injuries. Difficulties in psychosocial functioning with limitations in everyday life may dominate for some time after the injury. Our study therefore investigates the relationships between pain, post-traumatic stress, depression, and community integration. A set of questionnaires was answered by 191 persons (88 men, 103 women) five years after a whiplash injury to assess pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS), whiplash-related symptoms, post-traumatic stress (impact of event scale, IES), depression (Beck depression inventory, BDIII), community integration (community integration questionnaire, CIQ), life satisfaction (LiSat-11). One or more depressive symptoms were reported by 74% of persons; 22% reported scores that were classified as mild to severe depression. The presence of at least one post-traumatic symptom was reported by 70% of persons, and 38% reported mild to severe stress. Total scores of community integration for women were statistically significantly higher than for men. The total VAS score was correlated positively to the IES (r=0.456, P<0.456), the BDI (r=0.646, P<0.001), and negatively to the CIQ (r=-0.300, P<0.001). These results highlight the view that a significant proportion of people experience both pain and psychological difficulties for a long time after a whiplash injury. These findings should be taken into consideration in the management of subjects with chronic whiplash symptoms and may support a multi-professional rehabilitation model that integrates physical, psychological, and psychosocial factors.

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Mental Illness, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Clare S. Allely and Bob Allely

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have a detrimental impact on the individual’s ability to benefit from rehabilitative prison-based programmes, and studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have a detrimental impact on the individual’s ability to benefit from rehabilitative prison-based programmes, and studies have also found that there is an association between PTSD and higher rates of re-offending. Studies have also found that a significant number of cases of trauma and PTSD go undetected and therefore untreated in individuals who are incarcerated.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was carried out exploring studies that have investigated PTSD in incarcerated populations to identify current clinical considerations and recommendations.

Findings

This paper explores the key findings from the literature and highlights the important clinical implications and recommendations.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper focusing specifically on how the findings from the literature can inform clinical practice and also what factors need to be given greater consideration, going beyond the current systematic and literature reviews in the field.

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Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Bettie Posey Bullard and Donna Power Rogers

Questions about the short- and long-term effects of the trauma of 9/11 on students with special needs and the coping strategies used by their teachers to deal…

Abstract

Questions about the short- and long-term effects of the trauma of 9/11 on students with special needs and the coping strategies used by their teachers to deal satisfactorily with the effects prompted the creation of a survey to examine these issues. While the survey was in its inception and before its completion, a consultation was held with a counselor from the Behavioral Studies program at the University of South Alabama to ensure that the survey was thorough and relevant to post-traumatic stress.

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Administering Special Education: In Pursuit of Dignity and Autonomy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-298-6

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Abstract

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Health Education, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Laurence Barton

Literature of trauma in the workplace after an organizationalcatastrophe often focuses on various aspects of a critical incidentwhere data are more readily available…

Abstract

Literature of trauma in the workplace after an organizational catastrophe often focuses on various aspects of a critical incident where data are more readily available because of organizational “pressure points” – public relations, technology and the financial impact of a disaster on a corporation. Highlights the fact that external public rarely express concern or even interest in the mental health of workers in an organization perceived as being responsible for a catastrophe. Provides results from recently published studies that reveal workers experience some trauma after a critical incident, ranging from mild depression, to the onset of manic disease, to suicidal thoughts. Scrutinizes the impact on departmental and organizational morale, production and sustainability of key projects to comprehend the organizational behaviour dimension of critical incidents in an appropriate context. Overviews the relationship of organizational behaviour to crisis management and analyses the impact of trauma upon workers at one department of large oil exploration company operating in Alaska. Reaches beyond anecdotal surveys to include an analysis of employee turnover in the immediate department of that company after four workers had been badly injured in a serious industrial accident. Results suggest attention must be paid to stress and trauma by employees who witness organizational catastrophes.

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Scott Williams and Jonathan Williams

While a return to work following trauma exposure can be therapeutic, this is not always so. As with many topics related to traumatic stress in organizations, several…

Abstract

Purpose

While a return to work following trauma exposure can be therapeutic, this is not always so. As with many topics related to traumatic stress in organizations, several contingency factors complicate the effort to draw an overarching conclusion about whether returning to work is therapeutic. The purpose of this paper is to present important determinants of whether work is therapeutic or triggering for those with traumatic stress conditions. The need for contingency approaches in the study of traumatic stress in organizations is illustrated.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on traumatic stress in organizations is reviewed.

Findings

Three of the key determinants of whether a return to work is therapeutic or triggering for traumatic stress sufferers are trauma-type contingencies, condition-type contingencies and work-setting contingencies. For instance, human-caused and task-related traumas are more likely than natural disasters to make a return-to-work triggering. Additionally, the time since developing a traumatic stress condition is inversely related to the degree of improvement in that condition through the experience of working. Moreover, managerial actions can affect how therapeutic an employee’s return to work is.

Practical implications

These findings suggest the challenges of reintegrating a traumatized employee to the workplace can be highly situation-specific. Careful consideration of the traumatic event suffered by each traumatic stress victim, their traumatic stress condition, and the work setting to which they would return are recommended.

Social implications

Promoting mental health in organizations can contribute to employers’ social performance.

Originality/value

Examination of the factors that complicate predicting whether work is therapeutic posttrauma demonstrates how contingency approaches can advance research on trauma in organizations.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Abstract

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A Meaningful Life at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-767-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Janet M. Nwaogu, Albert P.C. Chan, Carol K.H. Hon and Amos Darko

The demanding nature of the construction industry poses strain that affects the health of construction personnel. Research shows that mental ill health in this industry is…

Abstract

Purpose

The demanding nature of the construction industry poses strain that affects the health of construction personnel. Research shows that mental ill health in this industry is increasing. However, a review mapping the field to determine the extant of research is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to conduct a scientometric review of mental health (MH) research in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 145 bibliographic records retrieved from Web of Science and Scopus database were analyzed using CiteSpace, to visualize MH research outputs in the industry.

Findings

Top co-cited authors are Helen Lingard, Mei-yung Leung, Paul Bowen, Julitta S. Boschman, Peter E.D. Love, Martin Loosemore and Linda Goldenhar. Previous studies focused on healthy eating, work efficiency, occupational stress and workplace injury. Emerging research areas are centered around physiological health monitoring, work ability, and smart interventions to prevent and manage poor MH.

Research limitations/implications

Result is influenced by the citations in retrieved articles.

Practical implications

The study found that researchers in the construction industry have intensified efforts to leverage information technology in improving the health, well-being, and safety of construction personnel. Future research should focus on developing workplace interventions that incorporate organizational justice and flexible work systems. There is also a need to develop psychological self-reporting scales specific to the industry.

Originality/value

This study enhances the understanding of researchers on existing collaboration networks and future research directions. It provides information on foundational documents and authors whose works should be consulted when researching into this field.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Charmine E. J. Härtel and Jennifer M. O’Connor

Volunteerism underpins the sustainability of communities and a wide range of organizations. A review of the academic literature on volunteerism yields few studies…

Abstract

Volunteerism underpins the sustainability of communities and a wide range of organizations. A review of the academic literature on volunteerism yields few studies considering the role of emotions, but those that do exist clearly indicate that emotions are critical factors in the recruitment, retention, and wellbeing of volunteers. The contribution of this chapter is to provide a review of the existing published academic research on emotions in the context of volunteerism, and to put out a call for emotions research in this critical aspect of sustainable communities and organizations.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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