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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Judith Semeijn, Joris Van Ruysseveldt, Greet Vonk and Tinka van Vuuren

Adequate recovery from burnout is important to understand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether post-traumatic growth (PTG) contributes to higher engagement…

Abstract

Purpose

Adequate recovery from burnout is important to understand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether post-traumatic growth (PTG) contributes to higher engagement and reduced symptoms of burnout and whether this process is mediated by personal resources.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional survey, 166 Dutch workers who had fully recovered from burnout were questioned on their level of PTG, their personal resources (optimism, resilience and self-efficacy), and their levels of engagement and burnout.

Findings

Fully recovered workers scored somewhat higher on current burnout level, but did not differ from norm group workers in their engagement level. Moreover, PTG appeared to positively affect both higher engagement and lower burnout levels, which is fully mediated by personal resources.

Research limitations/implications

Post-traumatic growth (PTG) impacts on engagement and burnout levels amongst workers who have recovered from burnout by enhancing personal resources. The role of personal resources and the impact of PTG on engagement and burnout complaints following (recovery from) burnout deserve further investigation.

Practical implications

Management can support workers who have (recovered from a) burnout, by being aware of their (higher) engagement, and facilitate the enhancement of PTG and personal resources.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to study the role of PTG after (recovery from) burnout and reveals valuable findings for both research and practice.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Jessica L. Sniatecki, Jennifer Randhare Ashton, Holly B. Perry and Linda H. Snell

The number of students with disabilities pursuing a college education has increased dramatically in recent years (Hall and Belch, 2000; Hitchings et al., 2011; Horn et al.

Abstract

Purpose

The number of students with disabilities pursuing a college education has increased dramatically in recent years (Hall and Belch, 2000; Hitchings et al., 2011; Horn et al., 2006; Retish and Horvath, 2005; Snyder et al., 2016; Stodden et al., 2001), yet, evidence suggests that these students continue to encounter significant challenges and barriers that may have a dramatic effect on their college experience (Madaus and Shaw, 2006; Sniatecki et al., 2015; Stodden et al., 2001). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Positive experiences and aspects of being a college student with a disability have not garnered as much consideration and have received little attention in the professional literature to date. The current study sought to address this gap through examination of positive aspects of disability among 12 undergraduate students. Data were gathered via qualitative interviews.

Findings

Results included five distinct themes related to students’ experiences: personal growth and self-acceptance; empathy/understanding; advocacy and teaching others; unique relationship experiences and opportunities; and drive/determination/perseverance.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of these themes and future directions for research on positive aspects of disability are also addressed.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide support for the social model of disability as a lens to view individuals with disabilities as complete people who, with their impairments, can and do go on to lead positive and meaningful lives.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Muhammad Taufiq Amir and Peter Standen

This study argues that existing constructs of psychological resilience of employees focus too narrowly on recovery from adverse events. Therefore, this paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study argues that existing constructs of psychological resilience of employees focus too narrowly on recovery from adverse events. Therefore, this paper aims to present an alternative construct in which resilience reflects an intention to grow as a person when facing both opportunities and difficulties. Initial evidence for a measure of growth-based resilience is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, a six-step scale development procedure was used. Items were generated deductively, and an exploratory factor analysis on data from a sample of 167 Indonesian managers was used to refine the scale structure. Study 2 validated the Study 1 results using a two-step confirmatory factor analysis, including structural equation modelling, involving a second sample of 241 Indonesian managers.

Findings

Study 1 suggested a scale using 16 items reflecting two dimensions, Developmental Persistency, involving perseverance and commitment to growth, and Positive Emotion. Study 2 generally confirmed the structure of this measure and produced expected correlations with other theoretically related constructs. Overall, the findings support the reconceptualisation of resilience as a response to life challenges and opportunities focussed on growing as a person.

Research limitations/implications

Further testing of the validity of this construct is recommended, and its nomological network should be examined to clarify its relationship to related concepts such as hardiness, coping, thriving and similar qualities.

Practical implications

The growth-based perspective allows organisations to better assess and improve employee resilience as it more accurately reflects the nature of resilience as a fundamental “positive” dimension of human personality, where existing approaches focus merely on recovering from workplace adversities. An implication is that employee development efforts focussed more on personal development than specific work skills, or at least contextualising the latter in the person’s life context, will be more successful.

Originality/value

A more holistic view of resilience as the capacity for responding to life’s challenges and opportunities through personal growth resolves a number of issues created by existing recovery-based constructs.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Mark H. Chae and Douglas J. Boyle

The purpose of this paper is to explore risk and protective factors associated with suicidal ideation among law enforcement personnel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore risk and protective factors associated with suicidal ideation among law enforcement personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is based on the “Best Evidence Synthesis” approach, whereby researchers systematically examine and integrate the most empirically sound available research on the topic under investigation.

Findings

Results of studies showed that the interaction of multiple risk factors had a cumulative effect in increasing the risk for suicidal ideation. In total, five prominent aspects of policing were associated with risk for suicidal ideation: organizational stress; critical incident trauma; shift work; relationship problems; and alcohol use and abuse. Studies also indicated that protective factors and preventative measures had stress‐buffering effects which decreased the impact of police stressors.

Research limitations/implications

The model is limited because few studies have employed methodologically‐sound research designs to test risk and protective factors related to police suicide. This conceptual overview may facilitate theory development and provide directions for future research.

Practical implications

Law enforcement agencies which implement programs that assist police personnel in developing active coping styles, identify and access available social support systems, as well as utilize community‐based services may decrease risk for suicidal ideation. This review provides practical applications for law enforcement training, education, and program development.

Originality/value

The paper represents the most recent review of risk and protective factors related to suicidal ideation among police personnel. This integration of research provides police practitioners with an evidence‐based ecological framework that can be applied universally in police management settings.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Elizabeth Velazquez and Maria Hernandez

The purpose of this paper is to review current research on police officer mental health and to explore the reasons why police officers do not seek mental health treatment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current research on police officer mental health and to explore the reasons why police officers do not seek mental health treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive, systematic search of multiple academic databases (e.g. EBSCO Host) were used to identify studies conducted within the USA, identified definitions of first responders, identified the type of duty-related trauma expected by police officers, how influential stigma is amongst the police culture and what current intervention strategies are employed to assist police officer mental health wellness.

Findings

This research was conducted to identify police officer trauma-related mental health and the stigma behind seeking treatment. The research highlights job-related trauma and stress leads to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, substance use disorder and suicide or suicide ideation. The stigma behind seeking mental health treatment is associated with law enforcement organizations and environmental factors. Organizational factors include occupational stress characteristics such as day-to-day of the job and environmental factors such as abiding by social and law enforcement culture ideologies. Further research should be conducted to understand why law enforcing agencies and personnel are unknowingly promoting stigmas.

Originality/value

This is the most current meta-review of research examining the severity of mental health in police officers, the stigma behind acquiring treatment and innovative treatment approaches in police officer mental health. This study will provide a useful resource for those researchers interested in continuing to examine the different aspects of police officer mental health and how to potently approach innovative interventions to help law enforcement personals mental wellness thrive in a field where trauma is experienced daily.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Wahab Shahbaz and Aymen Sajjad

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the notions of management control systems (MCS), mindfulness and sustainability, and introduce a framework demonstrating how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the notions of management control systems (MCS), mindfulness and sustainability, and introduce a framework demonstrating how sustainability outcomes – specifically occupational health and safety (OHS) improvements – can be accomplished by incorporating mindfulness-based interventions (or mindfulness-based training) as an effective MCS enabler.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have conducted an integrative literature review to synthesize the knowledge of the mindfulness, sustainability and MCS literatures with a specific focus on OHS.

Findings

The findings revealed that there is a dearth of research that has investigated the potential linkages between mindfulness, MCS and sustainability. While some studies have explored the role of MCS in promoting sustainability and corporate social responsibility concepts, as well as the linkages between mindfulness and sustainability, this paper specifically looked at how mindfulness-based interventions can be applied in the organizational context to enhance OHS sustainability outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This paper introduces a framework that shows how mindfulness-based interventions, as a means of MCS, can be used to enhance desired OHS sustainability outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper extends the sustainability, mindfulness and MCS literature by explicating how mindfulness-based interventions can be used as one of the key MCS enablers that support sustainability and OHS outcomes. Accordingly, the authors argue that this is one of the few early review papers that have investigated the potential connections between mindfulness, sustainability and MCS in the OHS context.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Pasquale Caponnetto

The burden of mental illness is profound and growing. Each year, almost one in three adults in the non-institutionalized community has a diagnosable mental or addictive…

Abstract

The burden of mental illness is profound and growing. Each year, almost one in three adults in the non-institutionalized community has a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder, and this figure climbs to approximately 40% among emergency departments patients. We described the principal cardiovascular acute disease and their emotional and behavioral consequences where psychological intervention could improve the care pathway and clinical outcome. Peer-reviewed articles from Medline, Psycinfo, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane library, about psychological and psychopathological sequelae in cardiovascular acute disease were searched. The psychological and psychopathological sequelae associated to stroke include emotional and behavioral changes and cognitive impairment. Fear, symptoms of depression, anxiety or specific post-traumatic symptoms like intrusions, hyper-arousal and/or cognitive avoidance are common in people suffering of cardiovascular acute disease treated at emergency departments. In emergency departments, health personnel must recognize psychological and psychopatho-logical sequelae in cardiovascular acute disease in order to develop effective interventions for these patients. Identify factors that are associated with both psychological distress and physical distress and promote interventions aimed at reducing psychological distress and improving psychological health empowerment is an important element to consider in order to offer the best care to vulnerable population as that suffering of cardiovascular acute disease.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jennifer Walinga and Wendy Rowe

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to transform one's perception of workplace stressors, moving beyond the idea of merely surviving or coping with stress to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to transform one's perception of workplace stressors, moving beyond the idea of merely surviving or coping with stress to “thriving” within what is becoming a non‐negotiable level of stress in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers generated a working definition of work stress thriving based on current literature, then conducted a content analysis of qualitative interviews to develop an empirically‐grounded understanding of factors differentiating a stress transformation response from a coping response to workplace stressors.

Findings

The study revealed key characteristics of a stress transformation response to stress challenges in the work place: systemic cognitive appraisal, inclusive communication strategies, collaborative and sustainable problem solving, individual learning and growth, and organizational positive impacts.

Research limitations/implications

As a pilot study, limitations to the research include a relatively small sample size and only one type of work environment. More empirical work is needed to test the model, develop and validate measures of stress transformation.

Practical implications

Findings provide the foundation for further empirical research into stress transformation, and will potentially lead to the development of measures, training interventions, organizational structures, and work processes to enhance stress thriving within organizations.

Social implications

The findings provide preliminary insights into tools for both organizational leaders and employees to respond more sustainably to increasingly stressful, fast paced, and complex work environments.

Originality/value

The study provides an original conceptual perspective on the concept of stress management, calling for a paradigm shift that views stress as desirable and conducive to optimal performance.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Heilwine Bakker, Marc van Veldhoven, Tony Gaillard, Remy Hertogs and Margot Feenstra

Since policemen have a highly demanding job, they have a high risk of developing mental health problems, which may have a negative influence on their private life. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Since policemen have a highly demanding job, they have a high risk of developing mental health problems, which may have a negative influence on their private life. The purpose of this paper is to present a new questionnaire for measuring the functioning of rescue workers in life tasks outside of work.

Design/methodology/approach

The internal consistency, factor structure and concurrent validity of this life tasks test (LTT) were examined in a group of 108 policemen.

Findings

The test measures perceived effectiveness in the following five domains: social life, maintaining mental health, household and finance, giving meaning and maintaining positivity. Cronbach’s α was acceptable for two scales (>0.60) and good for the other three (>0.70). The hypothesized five-factor structure of the LTT was corroborated in a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent validity was examined by correlating the scores on the LTT with two established questionnaires, one for personality characteristics and one for work characteristics and work stress. All LTT scales, with the exception of social life, showed significant correlations with social support, workload and personality.

Research limitations/implications

This provides support for the concurrent validity of the questionnaire. Practical uses and future research are discussed.

Practical implications

The items are close to everyday clinical practice. It adds valuable information to the commonly used questionnaires on mental health complaints. The test may also provide insight on which life tasks domains are functioning well and which are in need of attention to improve the effectiveness.

Social implications

In both preventive and curative mental health support, it is important to enhance the effectiveness in life tasks, because it works as a buffer for the adversity of rescue work. Moreover, it gives rescue workers mastery of their personal life, makes self-management stronger, as well as it gives feelings of confidence and positive energy.

Originality/value

This is the first questionnaire to be designed and implemented for rescue workers.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Grant J. Rich and Skultip (Jill) Sirikantraporn

After decades of focus on disaster, crisis, and trauma itself, in recent years more attention has been devoted to the study of human strengths and resilience, as reflected…

Abstract

After decades of focus on disaster, crisis, and trauma itself, in recent years more attention has been devoted to the study of human strengths and resilience, as reflected in the rise of positive psychology and strengths-based social work. In particular, psychological growth after trauma has been increasingly studied, and one of the official terms referring to the phenomenon is posttraumatic growth (PTG). The PTG literature reflects work on positive psychology, trauma recovery, and resilience. The main components associated with PTG are new possibilities, interpersonal growth, personal growth, appreciation for life, and spiritual change (Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2014). These domains have been tested and measured with a scale, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. While PTG and related concepts such as resilience have been studied in various populations, they have not yet been investigated extensively in Southeast Asia (SEA) populations. This chapter explores the psychological examination of resilience and PTG in the SEA context, with some discussion of the background of both positive psychological concepts and PTG research cross-culturally, and their application to the SEA region specifically. Brief relevant trauma history of the region, such as human-made and natural hazards impacting the region’s individuals and communities, and similarities and differences in the results of these traumas will be described. Implications for broader international work as well as cultural and clinical implications also will be discussed in this chapter.

Details

Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery from Disasters: Perspectives from Southeast Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-791-1

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