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Article

Nancy V. Wuenderlich, Kristina Heinonen, Amy L. Ostrom, Lia Patricio, Rui Sousa, Chris Voss and Jos G.A.M. Lemmink

The purpose of this paper is to craft a future research agenda to advance smart service research and practice. Smart services are delivered to or via intelligent objects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to craft a future research agenda to advance smart service research and practice. Smart services are delivered to or via intelligent objects that feature awareness and connectivity. For service researchers and managers, one of the most fascinating aspects of smart service provision is that the connected object is able to sense its own condition and its surroundings and thus allows for real-time data collection, continuous communication and interactive feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on discussions in the workshop on “Fresh perspectives on technology in service” at the International Network of Service Researchers on September 26, 2014 at CTF, Karlstad, Sweden. The paper summarizes the discussion on smart services, adds an extensive literature review, provides examples from business practice and develops a structured approach to new research avenues.

Findings

We propose that smart services vary on their individual level of autonomous decision-making, visibility and embeddedness in objects and customer lives. Based on a discussion of these characteristics, we identify research avenues regarding the perception and nature of smart services, the adoption of smart services, the innovation through smart services as well as regarding the development of new business models.

Originality/value

Smart services is a new emerging topic in service marketing research, their implications on organizations, customers and the service landscape have not been fully explored. We provide a fresh perspective on service research by characterizing relevant aspects of smart service that will stimulate fruitful future research and advance the understanding and practice of smart services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Yiran Su and Thilo Kunkel

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanism of the spillover effect from a service brand alliance to its parent brand at the post-consumption stage.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanism of the spillover effect from a service brand alliance to its parent brand at the post-consumption stage.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were used to collect both qualitative and quantitative data from participants of an actual event. Conceptual models were developed and tested on two cross-sectional samples using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results demonstrate perceived brand contribution and consumer involvement mediate the relationship between the service brand alliance experience and the evaluation of its parent brand at the post-consumption stage. While perceived brand fit had an indirect effect on the parent brand, the spillover was mostly driven by service alliance experience and perceived brand contribution.

Practical implications

Findings indicate brand managers should focus on consumers’ brand experience of the service brand alliance to drive spillover evaluations to the parent brand, and organizations could extend brand alliances to services with low category fit to the parent brand if consumers are to have a good experience with the service brand alliance.

Originality/value

This research extends findings on brand alliance research that was based on hypothetical brands and indicated that the spillover effect from a brand alliance to the parent brand is influenced by perceived brand fit. The findings highlight the importance of consumer experiences in driving the spillover effect at the post-consumption stage, where consumers evaluate brand relationships from a value-added perspective that goes beyond the service category fit.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article

Maegan Zarley Watson and Ruoh‐Nan Yan

The purpose of the study is to explore the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers in regards to their consumer decision process stages (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers in regards to their consumer decision process stages (i.e. purchase/consumption, post‐consumption evaluation, and divestment).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected via focus groups and personal interviews. Participants were recruited through flyers that were posted at various locations, including a college campus, select retail stores, and www.craigslist.com The sample consisted of 38 participants, 22 fast fashion and 16 slow fashion. All participants were female, 18 years of age or older, with a mean age of 21.2 years.

Findings

Three groups of themes emerged. The purchase/consumption themes were buyers’ remorse avoidance, utilitarianism, hedonism, and style/self‐image congruence. The post‐consumption evaluation themes included instant satisfaction vs continued satisfaction and consumer expectation confirmation. Finally, the divestment themes consisted of divestment frequencies, divestment reasons, and divestment approaches.

Research limitations/implications

This study explored the purchase and post‐purchase stages of the Consumer Decision Process (CDP) model. This particular focus on the CDP model, in the context of fast (vs slow) fashion, has not been researched in the past. Additionally, this research adds to the body of knowledge by utilizing the CDP model to understand the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers.

Practical implications

Fast fashion and slow fashion retailers may use this research to better understand their target markets by understanding why they choose to purchase/consume, what influences their post‐consumption evaluation, and how and why they choose to divest their clothing.

Originality/value

Past research has demonstrated the importance of understanding the supply chain and business model aspect of fast fashion. However, no empirical studies have been found that examine the decision‐making process of consumers of fast (vs slow) fashion.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Blanca Hernandez-Ortega

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of positive online consumer reviews (OCRs) on changes in the individual’s evaluations from the pre-purchase to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of positive online consumer reviews (OCRs) on changes in the individual’s evaluations from the pre-purchase to the post-consumption stage, studying satisfaction, attitude towards the firm and purchase intention. The effect of positive OCRs may differ depending on whether the product performance is high or low, i.e., whether the product meets the objectives of the consumer. So, the paper also explores different effects that positive OCRs can have on changes in the individual’s evaluations depending on the kind of performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies based on the experimental methodology are carried out and several statistical techniques are applied: confirmatory factorial analysis, mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis.

Findings

Results demonstrate that the effect of positive OCRs continues after consumption. Depending on the performance, this effect can be positive (negative) and verify (contrast with) the individual’s pre-purchase evaluations. Moreover, this effect is always more intense when the performance is low.

Originality/value

It explores the changes in the individual’s evaluations about the product and the firm, going beyond the immediate effect of positive OCRs. It also explains the effects of positive OCRs for high and low performance. Finally, it demonstrates that OCR effects are not symmetrical for high and low performance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Chadwick J. Miller, Adriana Samper, Naomi Mandel, Daniel C. Brannon, Jim Salas and Martha Troncoza

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the number of activities within a multi-activity experience influences consumer preferences before and after consumption.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the number of activities within a multi-activity experience influences consumer preferences before and after consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using four experiments and a secondary data set from a river cruise firm that includes first-time river cruise purchases by consumers from this firm between January 2011 and December 2015 (n = 337,457).

Findings

Consumers prefer experiences with fewer (vs more) activities before consumption – a phenomenon, this paper calls “activity apprehension” – but prefer experiences with more (vs fewer) activities after consumption. A mediation analysis indicates that this phenomenon occurs because the highly perishable nature of activities makes consumers uncertain about their ability to use all the activities within the experience (usage uncertainty).

Practical implications

Evaluations of a multi-activity experience depend on both the number of activities and on whether the consumer is at the pre- or post-consumption stage of the customer journey. As such, firms looking to sell multi-activity experiences should design and promote these experiences in a way that minimizes activity apprehension.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate that consumer perceptions of an optimal experience depend on both the number of included activities and on the stage of the customer journey (i.e. pre- or post-purchase). It further contributes to the consumer experience literature by examining an unexplored activity characteristic, perishability, in shaping experiential purchase decisions. Finally, it demonstrates a new way in which experiential purchases differ from tangible product purchases.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Amalia Triantafillidou and George Siomkos

The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of the different aspects of consumption experience on various post-consumption variables (i.e. satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of the different aspects of consumption experience on various post-consumption variables (i.e. satisfaction, nostalgia intensity, word-of-mouth (WOM) communication and behavioural intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted. The sample comprised of 645 respondents and the snowball sampling technique was used. Consumption experience was measured using a seven-dimensional scale (dimensions: hedonic, flow, escapism, socialisation, personal challenge, learning and communitas).

Findings

Not all experience dimensions affect consumers equally in the post-consumption stage. Hedonism was an important experiential dimension affecting positively most of the post-consumption variables. Other boosters of consumers’ nostalgia, WOM communication and behavioural intentions were the feelings of escapism, knowledge and communitas. On the contrary, flow and personal challenge were negative predictors of consumers’ evaluations.

Practical implications

Marketers should co-create the experience with consumers by carefully managing their experiential offering. Companies should focus on designing pleasurable, social, educational and fantasy experiences while minimizing the feelings of immersion and risk that arise from intense activities.

Originality/value

A holistic conceptual model on the consequences of the different consumption experience dimensions is tested. Until now, most of the relevant studies on experiences have treated experience as a higher order construct without taking into consideration the different effects of the various experience dimensions. Hence, the present study contributes to research by identifying the most pertinent experience dimensions on post-consumption evaluations, behaviour and intentions of consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Adrian Palmer and Martin O’Neill

Methods of measuring service quality have suffered from a lack of discussion about perceptual processes involved in a consumer’s evaluation of quality. Most importantly…

Abstract

Methods of measuring service quality have suffered from a lack of discussion about perceptual processes involved in a consumer’s evaluation of quality. Most importantly, it is the perception of service quality at the time of the next purchase decision that may better explain repeat buying behaviour, rather than the traditional measure taken immediately post‐consumption. This paper reports on a study of visitors to an adventure theme park. A longitudinal study employing a modified SERVQUAL scale observed that perceptions of service quality declined with the passage of time. Perceptions of items of high importance and those involving tangible elements declined the least. Changes in individuals’ perceptions over time were found to be associated with changes in behavioural intention.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

James L. Walker

Presents a model of service encounter satisfaction offeringconceptual and pragmatic advantages over the dominant disconfirmationparadigm. Expectations are compared with…

Abstract

Presents a model of service encounter satisfaction offering conceptual and pragmatic advantages over the dominant disconfirmation paradigm. Expectations are compared with performance, at three separate stages, which directly combine into one overall consumer service encounter judgment. Offers service practitioners increased insight into understanding consumers′ satisfaction processes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Yiran Su and Thilo Kunkel

Existing research neglected examining the environmental effect of an event on the effectiveness of sponsorship activation in a competitive setting. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research neglected examining the environmental effect of an event on the effectiveness of sponsorship activation in a competitive setting. The purpose of this study is to explore how the event environment impacts consumers’ attitudinal and behavioral responses to competitive brands that co-present at an event.

Design/methodology/approach

The research comprised an exploratory pre-test and two studies at a sport event with a retailing environment. The exploratory pre-test was used to examine the competitive relationship in the local market between the market leader and the lesser-known sponsoring brand. Study 1 used structural equation modelling to test how the event environment impacts consumers’ attitudes toward both brands at the post-consumption stage. Study 2 compared actual sales data of the two competing brands to examine the immediate effect of the sponsorship space on consumption.

Findings

The results revealed the event environment had an impact on consumers’ brand attitude toward both the lesser known sponsoring brand and the non-sponsoring market leader. However, the effect on the sponsoring brand that activated its sponsorship was influenced by consumer involvement with the event and was more salient. Furthermore, the product sales of the less-known sponsoring brand outperformed that of the market leader that co-presented at the event.

Originality/value

This study addresses a call to go beyond exploring the brand image of the sponsoring brands in isolation and holistically examine sponsorship effectiveness. The study contributes to knowledge on both attitudinal and actual behavioural outcomes of sponsorship activation in a competitive environment.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Frances Slack, Jennifer Rowley and Sue Coles

The purpose of this paper is to complement existing work on multi‐channel environments of shopping experiences and retail channels by exploring the use of different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complement existing work on multi‐channel environments of shopping experiences and retail channels by exploring the use of different channels in the consumer decision‐making processes associated with ticket purchase for performances in a regional annual theatre festival.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of the audience questionnaire focuses on the relative use of different channels and specifically the importance of the Internet in the stages leading up to attendance at the festival – awareness, information gathering, decision making and purchase transaction.

Findings

The extent of use of different channels at different stages in the decision‐making process varies, although the Internet is the only channel that can be and is used to support all stages of the process. Throughout the process, with the exception of purchase transaction, the use of word‐of‐mouth is significant. Customers who started using the Internet at the awareness stage often continued to use it. Neither gender nor age has a significant effect on patterns of channel use.

Originality/value

This study contributes to research into the use of multiple channels in consumer decision making, particularly in relation to customer multi‐channel employment, the factors that affect channel use, and the role of word‐of mouth in multi‐channel contexts.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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