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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Diane L. Shoos

In this chapter I employ a hybrid critical framework that draws on feminist media studies, feminist critiques of post-feminism, theories of intersectionality, and genre…

Abstract

In this chapter I employ a hybrid critical framework that draws on feminist media studies, feminist critiques of post-feminism, theories of intersectionality, and genre theory to consider a range of domestic violence stories on screen. The chapter begins with a summary of prototypical patterns of narrative and character in contemporary Hollywood films about abuse and subsequently explores two recent media representations that, while conforming to certain of these patterns, also introduce alternative perspectives: the 2017/2019 Home Box Office miniseries Big Little Lies and French director Xavier Legrand's 2018 film Custody (Jusqu’à la garde). I argue that both of these media texts draw on familiar genres that engage audiences not simply to generate sympathy for the abused woman-turned-heroine, but to challenge persistent myths about domestic violence such as that abusers are monsters who never show love towards their partners; that abused women are weak, passive, and the victims of their own bad judgment; that the effects and repercussions of abuse end with the departure of the abuser; that, ultimately, the problem of abuse must be “solved” by the individual; that the “solution” is as simple as leaving; and that there is little as a community or a society that we can do. I conclude that, in different ways and to different degrees, each of these media texts succeeds in making small but significant interventions into the predictable formulas of mainstream Hollywood domestic violence films through narratives that foreground the complexities, contradictions, and dilemmas of abuse.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2019

Aikaterini Soumelidou and Aggeliki Tsohou

The purpose of this paper is to propose visualization techniques as a new representation for privacy policies instead of traditional textual representation and to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose visualization techniques as a new representation for privacy policies instead of traditional textual representation and to examine empirically their effects on users’ information privacy awareness level.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors selected as a case the privacy policy of Instagram and conducted two empirical investigations, each one with three interventions and each representing a different version of the Instagram privacy policy to users. Through a pre- and a post-questionnaire, the authors examined the effects that each representation technique had on the users’ privacy awareness level.

Findings

The paper finds that visualized privacy policies lead to higher privacy awareness levels than conventional textual ones, especially when icons are included.

Research limitations/implications

The authors implemented two new representation techniques offering beneficial guidelines for designing more attractive privacy policy representations. However, the samples are rather limited for generalization to the wide population; nonetheless, they are significant to demonstrate the effect of visualized techniques. The findings might also be subject to bias (e.g. brand bias), although the authors took necessary methodological actions to prevent bias.

Practical implications

The results and the methodology of the paper could guide practitioners for the representation of a privacy policy, given that the authors provide systematic and concrete steps.

Originality/value

This paper examines the value of privacy policy visualization as a new approach for enabling user privacy awareness, as well as implements two visualization techniques for a given privacy policy. The paper and its findings should be useful for researchers, as well as for practitioners.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Damon P. Coppola

This paper aims to examine the roots of public fear and often‐distorted reality of risk, and proposes methods by which emergency management agencies can successfully…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the roots of public fear and often‐distorted reality of risk, and proposes methods by which emergency management agencies can successfully manage fear, should a terror‐based event occur within their jurisdiction.

Design/methodology/approach

The October 2002 sniper crisis in Washington, DC is used to identify the processes by which public fear is generated, maintained, and managed.

Findings

In the USA's post‐9/11 era of terror‐awareness, extreme actions of groups like Al Qaeda are no longer necessary to spark detrimental anxiety‐based social reactions. The two snipers who placed the nation's capital under siege for three weeks with one rifle and a box of bullets confirmed this fact. Washington, DC's duct tape and plastic panic buying spree, spurred by a Terrorism Threat Index increase, illustrated how the mere hint of a future event can induce irrational behavior.

Practical implications

Clearly, the emergency management community can no longer simply blame the media for such strong public sentiment. Controlling public fear is a public safety responsibility but fear management must be supported by the Federal government to be effective. There exists a rapidly‐growing need for agencies to adopt formal fear management capabilities staffed by appropriately‐trained, dedicated officials. In many cases of terrorism, fear is the greatest emergency that must be managed, and irresponsible or inadequate attempts to do so can actually increase public risk. This paper proposes methods by which emergency management agencies can successfully manage fear, should a terror‐based event occur within their jurisdiction.

Originality/value

This paper will assist emergency managers, administrators at the city, county, and national levels, and others involved in planning for the management of fear during emergencies that can occur in the aftermath of terror‐based events.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Dave Lawrence

Describes a new way that marketers can determine the success of their promotions in store, and discovers the types of supermarket promotions that work, and why: for…

Abstract

Describes a new way that marketers can determine the success of their promotions in store, and discovers the types of supermarket promotions that work, and why: for instance, it confirms the promotional value of free toys with cereals, especially for younger children. Outlines how the PromoPull evaluation tool was developed to measure promotional pull, ie the share of buyers who bought the product due to the promotion, using children’s food products with both large and small promotional budgets; the database enables analysis of promotions against category, brand, mechanic and demographic averages. Shows in tabular form the top performing supermarket promotions in July 2004.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Colin Wood and Paul Walker

Describes how Royal Mail recognized the need to embark on a totalquality programme to improve the service given and to upgrade customerperception of Royal Mail. Shows how…

Abstract

Describes how Royal Mail recognized the need to embark on a total quality programme to improve the service given and to upgrade customer perception of Royal Mail. Shows how Royal Mail set about developing a “Customer First” strategy, initiating training and instigating a continuous improvement ethic. The programme involved all levels of staff from the managing director through to front‐line employees and established a quality support network in the process. A total of 120,000 people took part at various Royal Mail sites throughout the UK. Gives details of workshop content, the training programme itself and describes how pilot activity was measured and improvements carried out. Concludes that the strategy has been implemented successfully with positive results for the period 1988 to date.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

Adam Knowles

The fifth in our series of articles covering the major aspects of industrial advertising and marketing by Adam Knowles

Abstract

The fifth in our series of articles covering the major aspects of industrial advertising and marketing by Adam Knowles

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 81 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Thomas G. Basler

Community outreach is generally stated to be a strategic combination of resources and talents that will exceed the capabilities of individuals working alone. Describes the…

Abstract

Purpose

Community outreach is generally stated to be a strategic combination of resources and talents that will exceed the capabilities of individuals working alone. Describes the Medical University of South Carolina's projects which target largely rural, minority populations.

Design/methodology/approach

Programs and partnerships include niche groups and state‐wide populations, with sponsors including government agencies, the Duke Endowment and local cities. Librarians are familiar with and are already successful at reaching out to the community of health professionals; however, reaching out to the lay community is more complex. Academics are used to being in charge and often have a narrow point‐of‐focus. Together with the community an attempt was made to identify difficulties and pitfalls, as well as outcomes that are important for the long term.

Findings

Although librarians are improving their ability to work in any capacity within community outreach projects, universities and libraries do not naturally support this work. However, for some librarians participation provides an exhilarating experience.

Originality/value

The paper indicates the value of having a librarian as part of the community outreach team. Librarians are often of great value to the team. Very often the work done by the librarian would not have been done at all.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Prasad Vidyasagar Mandke

The purpose of this paper is to study the phenomenon of abrupt shift by both doctors and patients to telemedicine during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and associated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the phenomenon of abrupt shift by both doctors and patients to telemedicine during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and associated economic lockdown in India. The study explored various drivers of telemedicine technology awareness, adoption and usage. These drives were studied from both the doctors and the patients’ perspectives using the Push–Pull–Mooring (PPM) theoretical model.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research was carried out with 24 doctors and 32 patients. This research was conducted in major urban cities of India. It was carried out during the economic lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The data was collected based upon a semi-structured open-ended questionnaire using telephonic interviews. Once thematic saturation was achieved, thematic content analysis was conducted. Finally, the themes were classified and analyzed using the PPM theoretical model

Findings

The data analysis indicated that there was the presence of all three factors, namely, push, pull and mooring. For the doctors, pull and push factors were more substantive than mooring factors. Although for the patients push and mooring factors were more important and pressing than pull factors.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic lockdown in India. The interview respondents were located only in urban India. Future studies could be conducted to explore similarities and differences in telemedicine adoption patterns during non-crisis times vis-a-vis crisis times in urban and rural settings.

Practical implications

The insights from this study could be used by medical service providers to leverage telemedicine technology to improve the business model, service delivery, pricing strategy, value proposition and behavioral characteristics. Patients on the other hand could gather perspectives regarding how best to use telemedicine technological services.

Originality/value

The authors provided an integrated perspective regarding telemedicine technology awareness, adoption and usage in an emerging economy of India during the critical times of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis and the associated prolonged economic lockdown. This was one of the first studies that applied PPM theory for telemedicine adoption

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Abstract

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Gary Warnaby and Kit Man Yip

The need for a more overt marketing orientation within planned shopping centres in the UK has been noted by various authors. However, the management orientation of planned…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for a more overt marketing orientation within planned shopping centres in the UK has been noted by various authors. However, the management orientation of planned shopping centres has been described as property‐ rather than customer‐led. This article considers the role of marketing for planned shopping centres, with particular reference to regional shopping centres (RSCs). The emphasis of marketing activity in this context is primarily promotional, and the process by which promotional activities are planned and implemented by RSCs is considered and contrasted with Fill's model of the marketing communications planning process.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were undertaken with marketing managers in four of the nine RSCs in the UK (two interviews were face‐to‐face, one interview was by telephone and one interview was via e‐mail). These exploratory interviews sought to identify: respondents’ perceptions of marketing and the role of the marketing function within the organisation; the nature of the marketing/promotional objectives that were set; the identity of the target audiences for marketing/promotional activity; the process by which this activity was planned; and the specific marketing/promotional tools used. All the interviews were analysed using the template analysis technique.

Findings

Findings are reported under the following headings: role of marketing; perceptions of marketing; marketing planning; target audiences/objectives; promotional activities; and evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

This research is exploratory, comprising four interviews (however, there are only nine RSCs in the UK). More detailed research into the processes of marketing communications planning in this context should be implemented.

Practical implications

This paper shows how general models relating to theoretical aspects of marketing (in this case marketing communications planning), may need to be amended to reflect the practical reality of specific market contexts and the discussion section of the paper outlines this in more detail.

Originality/value

Following on from the above point, the paper provides a framework for marketing communications planning in the specific context of RSCs in the UK. As such, it has resonance for the practice of marketing in all planned retail developments.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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