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Article

Wen‐Bao Lin

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of the difference between the consumer's expectation and perception of service quality on postpurchase behavior

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of the difference between the consumer's expectation and perception of service quality on postpurchase behavior intentions, and the effect of the consumer's personality traits and the enterprise's service recovery strategy as intervening variables on postpurchase behavior intentions of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A sampling survey is carried out among customers of the top ten banking industries in Taiwan. A convenient sampling survey is carried out among customers of the top ten banks. A total of 243 effective samples are returned.

Findings

The result shows that the smaller the difference between expectation and perception of service quality is, the more the consumers will show their loyalty in postpurchase behavior; the bigger the difference between expectation and perception of service quality is, the more the customers will make complaints and convert to other brands. When the difference is bigger between customer expectation and perception of service quality, the personality trait of external control orientation may prevail over the personality trait of internal control orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Intangible service is the core product of banks, but it is easily copied by competitors. Therefore, creation of brand image and improvement of goodwill are important for the establishment of uniqueness and distinguishability of a bank.

Practical implications

Service recovery is one of the major factors that influence the sequential actions of consumers. Service quality does not directly influence the sequential attitude and behavior of consumers; other intervening variables that exert direct influence exist.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified information need and offers practical help to the service industry.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article

Carrete Lucero

This paper aims to analyze the key problems related to the international purchasing operations and their interrelationship with the postpurchase industrial behavior

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the key problems related to the international purchasing operations and their interrelationship with the postpurchase industrial behavior: repeated purchase with modification, repeated purchase without modification and no rebuy. The objective is to develop a conceptual model in the area of international postpurchase industrial behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon prior research in business marketing, international marketing, international business and intercultural communication, and complemented by an exploratory qualitative approach, the paper proposes a conceptualization of the postpurchase industrial behavior and of the relationships between cost, logistics, governmental and cultural factors affecting international postpurchase industrial behavior.

Findings

This paper elaborates a conceptual model and research propositions that delineate the relationship between key problems of international purchasing and the postpurchase behavior of industrial firms. The importance of the cultural factor‐problem is outlined.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is to provide an emerging theory for the study of international postpurchase industrial behavior. The concept of postpurchasing behavior is explained in the context of international purchasing. Also, the paper provides insights of the effect of culture in international delivery times.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Hongfei Liu, Chanaka Jayawardhena, Victoria-Sophie Osburg and Mujahid Mohiuddin Babu

The influence of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) information, such as online reviews, on consumers’ decision making is well documented, but it is unclear if online reviews…

Abstract

Purpose

The influence of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) information, such as online reviews, on consumers’ decision making is well documented, but it is unclear if online reviews still matter in post-purchase evaluation and behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which online reviews (aggregate rating (AR) and individual reviews (IR)) influence consumers’ evaluation and post-purchase behaviour by considering the valence congruence of online reviews and consumption experience (CE).

Design/methodology/approach

Following social comparison theory and relevant literature, the authors conduct an online experiment (pre-test: n=180; main study: n=347). The authors rely on a 2 (CE valence) ×2 (AR valence) ×2 (IR valence) between-subjects design.

Findings

Congruence/incongruence between the valences of CE, AR and IR affects consumers’ post-purchase evaluation at the emotional, brand and media levels and review-writing behaviour. In comparison to aggregated rating, IR are more important in the post-purchase stage. Similarly, consumers have a higher eWOM-writing intention when there is congruence between the valences of CE, AR and IR.

Practical implications

The authors demonstrate the importance of service providers continually monitoring their business profiles on review sites to ensure consistency of review information, as these influence consumers’ post-purchase evaluation and behaviours. For this reason, the authors illustrate the utility of why media owners of review sites should support the monitoring process to facilitate the engagement of both businesses and customers.

Originality/value

The authors break new ground by empirically testing the impact of online review information post-purchase seen through the theoretical lens of social comparison. The approach is novel in breaking down and testing the dimensions of post-purchase evaluation and behavioural intentions in understanding the social comparison elicited by online reviews in the post-purchase phase.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article

Jingyi Duan and Ruby Roy Dholakia

The purpose of the present research is to investigate how consumers’ purchase posting behavior on social media influences their own happiness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present research is to investigate how consumers’ purchase posting behavior on social media influences their own happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents three studies. Study 1 was an experiment that manipulated purchase and posting behavior. Studies 2 and 3 utilized surveys which asked participants to report their actual purchases and posting behaviors. Data were examined using regression and bootstrap mediation analysis.

Findings

Posting purchases on social media has a positive influence on consumers’ happiness through the mediating roles of perceived impact of purchases on self and interpersonal relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the research on social media by demonstrating that because of its remarkable characteristics, posting purchases on social media significantly increases consumers’ happiness. It fills the research gap of how word-of-mouth and conspicuous consumption influences the storyteller’s happiness. It is also the first research which suggests that user-generated content of purchases actually can be a new carrier of conspicuous consumption. The findings shed light on the substantial influences of posting purchases on the use/consumption stage of consumer behavior.

Practical implications

Because posting purchases on social media increases consumers’ happiness, marketers can develop strategies to encourage consumers to post about their purchases more.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to demonstrate the positive effect of social media purchase posting on consumers’ happiness and identify the mechanism under which this effect occurs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Lingli Wang, Qiang Yan and Wenjing Chen

The purpose of this study is to examine the strategies used by consumers to control themselves in the Singles’ Day promotion. It also examines how promotion and social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the strategies used by consumers to control themselves in the Singles’ Day promotion. It also examines how promotion and social influence affect consumers’ purchase behavior and post-purchase evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach including a quantitative study (N =480) and a follow-up qualitative study (N =35) was conducted to verify the hypotheses and provide deeper insights.

Findings

This study demonstrates that consumers allocate in-store slack in shopping budgets to restrict unplanned purchases and in-store slack is positively related to post-purchase evaluation. Social influence, which helps consumers rationalize purchase decisions, has positive effects on planned purchases and post-purchase evaluation. Both promotion strength and promotion range moderate the relationship between in-store slack and unplanned purchases.

Originality/value

Most studies investigate how promotion designs affect consumers’ in-store decision-making. This study focuses on the Singles’ Day promotion in China and examines the tactics consumers use to control purchase behavior in the promotion.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Wilkins, Carina Beckenuyte and Muhammad Mohsin Butt

The purpose of this study is to discover the extent to which consumers are aware of air filling in food packaging, the extent to which deceptive packaging and slack…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to discover the extent to which consumers are aware of air filling in food packaging, the extent to which deceptive packaging and slack filling – which often result from package downsizing – lead to cognitive dissonance and the extent to which feelings of cognitive dissonance and being deceived lead consumers to engage in negative post-purchase behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analysed respondents’ reactions to a series of images of a specific product. The sample consisted of consumers of fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) in the UK. Five photographs served as the stimulus material. The first picture showed a well-known brand of premium chocolate in its packaging and then four further pictures each showed a plate with a different amount of chocolate on it, which represented different possible levels of package fill.

Findings

Consumer expectations of pack fill were positively related to consumers’ post-purchase dissonance, and higher dissonance was negatively related to repurchase intentions and positively related to both intended visible and non-visible negative post-purchase behaviours, such as switching brand and telling friends to avoid the product. Furthermore, consumers with low product involvement were less likely to repurchase the brand, and were more willing to engage in visible and non-visible negative behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

The key message from this study is that consumers’ post-purchase dissonance is likely to damage the firm. Although firms may initially achieve increased sales through deceptive packaging and slack filling, these practices risk damaging a brand’s reputation and consumer loyalty to the brand. Firms need to strike a balance between packaging size and content, and as consumer expectations are likely to vary across different products, individual companies should engage in market research and substantive market testing.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that investigates antecedents and consequences of cognitive dissonance experienced by consumers which was caused by perceived deceptive packaging and/or slack filling.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Sasikarn Chatvijit Cook and Jennifer Yurchisin

The current research explored both pre-purchase and post-purchase factors of consumer behaviour. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The current research explored both pre-purchase and post-purchase factors of consumer behaviour. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships that may exist among consumers’ perceptions of perishability, scarcity, low price, attitudes, impulse buying, post-purchase emotions, and product returns within the context of the fast fashion environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 246 usable questionnaires completed by female undergraduate students, who made purchases and product returns at fast fashion retailers, were analysed in SPSS and AMOS 23.0. Structural equation modelling was employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Consumers who are attracted to scarcity due to limited supply and scarcity due to time, referred to as perceived perishability, have a positive attitude towards the fast fashion retailers in which products are presented in scarce environments. Likewise, consumers have a positive attitude towards fast fashion retailers due to low priced merchandises they offer. Consequently, consumers who have a positive attitude towards the fast fashion retailers are likely to purchase products from them impulsively. Moreover, impulse buying behaviour positively influenced some negative post-purchase emotional responses, which in turn positively influenced product returns in the fast fashion environments.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the current study contribute to a greater understanding of apparel-related consumer behaviour in general. A theory formation of fast fashion consumer behaviour from acquisition to disposal can be drawn from the results of this study. Because some fast fashion retailers do sell clothing for both men and women, researchers could compare the responses of males and females to examine differences in consumer behaviour related to demographic characteristics. In the future, an examination of actual emotional responses and return behaviour would be beneficial for a more complete understanding of post-purchase consumer behaviour.

Practical implications

Fast fashion retailers could use this information to carefully design shopping environments that induce impulse buying behaviour because it may result in product returns. Fast fashion retailers need to understand the causes of the return behaviour, whether consumer related or product related, to better meet the needs of their target market. Return policies must be considered.

Originality/value

This research is the first to examine the impact of negative emotions following consumers’ impulse buying on product returns in the fast fashion retail environments.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Abdul Rais A.R., Zahari M.S.M., Chik C.T. and Hanafiah M.H.

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour in the hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model proposed comprises of five latent variables representing healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour. A total of 570 completed questionnaires were collected, and the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study found that eating behaviour and satisfaction significantly mediates the relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes and customers’ post-purchase behaviour. Meanwhile, customers’ perceived value weakly moderates the relationship between healthy cafeteria and eating behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first few which attempt to holistically measure the attributes that influence people to visit healthy cafeterias and the subsequent effect they have towards their post-purchase behaviour. The novelty of this study is portrayed through the inclusion of eating behaviour and the perceived value dimension in healthy foodservice study, which is still minimal compared to commercial foodservice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Peter David Clarke and Gary Mortimer

Self-gifting is a performative process in which consumers purchase products for themselves. The literature to date remains silent on a determination and connection between…

Abstract

Purpose

Self-gifting is a performative process in which consumers purchase products for themselves. The literature to date remains silent on a determination and connection between the extents of post-purchase regret resulting from self-gifting behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine identification and connection of self-gifting antecedents, self-gifting and the effect on post purchase regret.

Design/methodology/approach

This study claims the two antecedents of hedonistic shopping and indulgence drive self-gifting behaviors and the attendant regret. A total of 307 shoppers responded to a series of statements concerning the relationships between antecedents of self-gifting behavior and the effect on post-purchase regret. Self-gifting is a multi-dimensional construct, consisting of therapeutic, celebratory, reward and hedonistic imports. Confirmatory factor analysis and AMOS path modeling enabled examination of relationships between the consumer traits of hedonistic shopping and indulgence and the four self-gifting concepts.

Findings

Hedonic and indulgent shoppers engage in self-gifting for different reasons. A strong and positive relationship was identified between hedonic shoppers and reward, hedonic, therapeutic and celebratory self-gift motivations. hedonic shoppers aligned with indulgent shoppers who also engaged the four self-gifting concepts. The only regret concerning purchase of self-gifts was evident in the therapeutic and celebratory self-gift motivations.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation was the age range specification of 18 to 45 years which meant the omission of older generations of regular and experienced shoppers. This study emphasizes the importance of variations in self-gift behaviors and of post-purchase consumer regret.

Originality/value

This research is the first examination of an hedonic attitude to shopping and indulgent antecedents to self-gift purchasing, the concepts of self-gift motivations and their effect on post-purchase regret.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Hyun-Mee Joung

The purpose of this paper is to investigate materialistic consumers' apparel purchase, compulsive buying, environmental attitudes, and post-purchase behaviors regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate materialistic consumers' apparel purchase, compulsive buying, environmental attitudes, and post-purchase behaviors regarding hoarding, disposing, and participation in recycling.

Design/methodology/approach

Clothing is used to express the self. Materialistic consumers tend to be young and highly involved with clothing, and purchase compulsively and more than needed. They are more interested in getting possessions than disposing of them. This study was designed to uncover materialistic consumers' post-purchase behaviors. A survey questionnaire was developed and a total of 333 college students completed it in a classroom setting.

Findings

Results of a k-mean cluster analysis suggested two groups (materialistic consumers and non-materialistic consumers). Findings of independent t-tests indicated that materialistic consumers had significantly higher scores for apparel purchase, compulsive buying, value-oriented hoarding, and disposing, but lower scores for environmental attitudes than did non-materialistic consumers. No difference was found in participation in recycling between the two groups.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that marketing media should address benefits and ways to recycle and educate consumers in sustainable consumption behaviors.

Originality/value

Due to the nature of fashion, clothing is easily adopted and quickly becomes obsolete. Consumers easily dispose of clothing, which contributes to the increasing volume of textile waste. Although consumers are encouraged to participate in recycling to protect the environment, little research has focused on clothing post-purchase behaviors. Materialistic consumers' post-purchase behaviors regarding apparel hoarding, disposing, and participation in recycling is a new research area.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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