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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Joseph Amankwah‐Amoah

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of post‐exit knowledge diffusion created by departed firms on recipienfirms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of post‐exit knowledge diffusion created by departed firms on recipienfirms.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an inductive and exploratory study which tries to understand questions of how and why. The research used a qualitative interview methodology and data analysis using within and cross‐case analysis.

Findings

Analysis of the data revealed that recipient firms' strategic directions and organizational design are fundamentally shaped by the career imprint of the former managers of the departed firm.

Research limitations/implications

Practical and policy implications are identified and discussed. The study suggests that organizational failure should be viewed as having wider externalities, on both markets and society as a whole. The demise of an industry incumbent should not be viewed as necessarily having a negative impact, rather as a strategic opportunity for new firms to enter and for existing ones to expand by drawing on the expertise released by its departure.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to the literature by integrating learning‐from‐failure, knowledge spillover and career imprinting theories to examine the post‐exit effect of firm departure. The paper also counters prior emphasis of the extant literature on the relationship between work experience and job performance which has focused mainly on experience within the current firm, overlooking the importance of work experience acquired in prior firms.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Saurav Pathak

The study examines the role that societal levels of self-control – behavioral and cognitive self-control – play in shaping entrepreneurial intentions after both favorable…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the role that societal levels of self-control – behavioral and cognitive self-control – play in shaping entrepreneurial intentions after both favorable and unfavorable prior exits.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) data set on the nature of entrepreneurial exits from 32 countries between 2007 and 2010 and supplementing this data set with country-level scores of behavioral and cognitive self-controls, the authors test five hypotheses on the effects of societal levels of self-control on post-exit entrepreneurial intentions.

Findings

The study finds that individuals who exit entrepreneurship for negative reasons (versus positive reasons) are more likely to form entrepreneurial intentions. Further, societal levels of self-control moderate this likelihood.

Originality/value

The study invokes the psychological construct of self-control in the context of entrepreneurship. The novelty lies in rendering self-control as also a higher order societal level construct and then also empirically testing the role that societal self-control plays in shaping entrepreneurial intentions after prior exits. Societal self-control accounts for cross-country variance in why individuals in some societies are better suited and capable to return to entrepreneurship despite unfavorable prior exits.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Jonas Onkelinx, Tatiana S. Manolova and Linda F. Edelman

In this chapter, we explore the effect of export exit on subsequent firm performance in a sample of 13,629 Belgian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We find that…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the effect of export exit on subsequent firm performance in a sample of 13,629 Belgian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We find that firms that stop exporting have lower profitability and profitability declines even further after they exit foreign markets. Firms that were highly dependent on revenues from exports and firms exiting multiple markets are more negatively affected, as reflected in lower post-exit survival rates and profitability. However, export duration or exiting institutionally distant markets does not have a significant impact on subsequent firm performance. Finally, although firm performance is negatively affected by exit, failed internationalization does not always lead to firm failure. Theoretical and practitioner implications are discussed.

Details

Global Entrepreneurship: Past, Present & Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-483-9

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Executive summary
Publication date: 26 November 2018

UK/EU: Negotiating post-exit relations is next hurdle

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Anthony C. Klotz and Ryan D. Zimmerman

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about…

Abstract

Although a significant body of work has amassed that explores the antecedents, correlates, and consequences of employee turnover in organizations, little is known about how employees go about quitting once they have made the decision to leave. That is, after the decision to voluntarily quit their job is made, employees must then navigate through the process of planning for their exit, announcing their resignation, and potentially working at their company for weeks after their plans to resign have been made public. Our lack of understanding of the resignation process is important as how employees quit their jobs has the potential to impact the performance and turnover intentions of other organizational members, as well as to harm or benefit the reputation of the organization, overall. Moreover, voluntary turnover is likely to increase in the coming decades. In this chapter, we unpack the resignation process. Specifically, drawing from the communication literature and prior work on employee socialization, we develop a three-stage model of the resignation process that captures the activities and decisions employees face as they quit their jobs, and how individual differences may influence how they behave in each of these three stages. In doing so, we develop a foundation upon which researchers can begin to build a better understanding of what employees go through after they have decided to quit but before they have exited their organization for the final time.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Joseph Amankwah-Amoah

This study aims to examine the types of attributions after a business failure. Although business failure has garnered a plethora of scholarly attention, there remains an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the types of attributions after a business failure. Although business failure has garnered a plethora of scholarly attention, there remains an ambiguity and a lack of clarity about the process and types of attribution after a business failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a synthesis of the multiple streams of research on the subject. This led to the development of an integrated framework of attributions after business failure.

Findings

The paper integrates the business failure literature and attribution theory to develop a 2 × 2 conceptual framework which accounts for not only the effect on pace (time) but also locus of causality in the attribution process. Crossing the two main causes of business failure with two types of attribution produces the 2 × 2 matrix of types of attribution after a business failure which includes early internal attribution, late internal attribution, early external attribution and late external attribution.

Research limitations/implications

The theorisation of the literature offers a number of implications for theory and practice.

Originality/value

The study also explains the underlying processes inherent in learning from others’ failures and consequences of business failure. The framework removes some of the ambiguity in the existing literature and outlines a number of fruitful avenues for future research.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Kate Stewart

States that if the marketing community is to adopt the prescriptions of the relationship marketing school of thought, more knowledge and understanding of relationships is…

Abstract

States that if the marketing community is to adopt the prescriptions of the relationship marketing school of thought, more knowledge and understanding of relationships is required. The base of knowledge is growing and there is now greater appreciation of the processes germane to healthy relationships, such as trust, satisfaction and commitment. Much less attention has been paid to the negative aspects such as relationship breakdown and ending. This paper addresses the neglected area of the ending of customer‐bank relationships or customer exit. Interviews were conducted with bank customers who had recently used the exit option. Content analysis of the customers’ stories was used to generate a model of the customer exit process. As reported here, the research took the perspective of the customer. This shows that customers end bank relationships after an involving process of problem(s), effort, emotion and evaluation. A discussion of the findings concludes that banks need to develop relationship management systems and skills.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Abdul-Jalil Ibrahim and Monzer Kahf

This paper aims to explore how Sharīʿah-compliant instruments can be used to protect investments and attract investors to Islamic venture capital (IVC). Equity investments…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how Sharīʿah-compliant instruments can be used to protect investments and attract investors to Islamic venture capital (IVC). Equity investments in Islamic finance are trailing behind their potential value. This is partly due to the limited instruments available to protect investors, as most of the tools used in conventional venture capital (VC) are deemed Sharīʿah non-compliant.

Design/methodology/approach

The research amends and uses Wright Robbie’s (1998) VC structure and how it can be used to finance small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The study uses secondary data reported in the literature and the expertise of the Sharīʿah scholarship.

Findings

There are Sharīʿah-compliant instruments available for IVC that can be used to protect investments and incentivize potential investors to promote investments in SMEs. At the various stages of the IVC process, preference shares, perpetual mudharabah, diminishing musharakah, musharakah with murabahah, musharakah with qard, negligence clauses, liquidation preference, warrants and supermajority clauses can all be used with appropriate conditions to protect investors and offer incentives for them to invest in IVC.

Practical implications

The research provides a method for screening and evaluating potential deals for SMEs using an amended VC called an IVC scheme with a focus on Sharīʿah-compliant investment protection instruments. The method can promote SMEs and entrepreneurship and financial inclusion for Sharīʿah-compliant investors.

Originality/value

This study contributes new ideas to how IVC can be structured, taking into consideration Sharīʿah constraints. The paper addresses investors’ protection and incentives to attract Sharīʿah-compliant investors, which have been lacking in the literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Nick Beech, Jeff Gold and Susan Beech

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an understanding of how veterans see themselves in a civilian world, their ability to re-conceptualise and realign their perspective on life to support their transition in to a civilian world.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by Ricoeur’s theory of narrative identity, the work provides a qualitative analysis data from coaching interviews with five veterans.

Findings

The findings revealed the on-going legacy of military life and how its distinctiveness and belief centred on kinship shapes personal identity and the way they see their civilian world. The work sheds light on to the benefits of this Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach and how it can be used to provide a deeper insight in to the nature of personal transitions and how narrative can be used to expose complexities of the narratives of personal history and meaning as the narrator becomes both the seeker and what is sought.

Practical implications

The work reinforces the value of Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach identifying narrative mediating between two “poles” of identity and the act of mimesis; prefiguration, configuration and refiguration as veterans project stories of their world and their place within it.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights in to the importance of narrative identify broadening its potential application with engagement across diverse communities, thereby providing depth and rigour of its conceptual understanding of personal identify. The work further provides insights in to the challenges facing veterans to integrate within a civilian society.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Adel H. Salih and Roger Mansfield

Labour turnover has been recognised and studied as a management problem for several decades. Interest in the issue increased significantly at the beginning of the 20th…

Abstract

Labour turnover has been recognised and studied as a management problem for several decades. Interest in the issue increased significantly at the beginning of the 20th century, at about the same time as the scientific management movement began to develop. Over 1,500 publications on the topic of turnover are estimated to have appeared in this century. With this number of turnover studies published, it is surprising that there are still such large gaps in our understanding of the phenomenon. Not only are there more unanswered than answered questions about turnover, but we are only now learning the nature of some of the most important questions. In a small effort to fill some of the gaps, this article reports results from part of a large study of turnover amongst blue‐collar workers in manufacturing industry in Iraq.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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