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Article

Else Ouweneel, Pascale M. Le Blanc and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an individual oriented positive psychology intervention on positive emotions, self‐efficacy, and work engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an individual oriented positive psychology intervention on positive emotions, self‐efficacy, and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The online self‐enhancement intervention program consists of three types of online assignments: happiness assignments, goal setting assignments, and resource building assignments. The authors expected the self‐enhancement intervention group to show a significantly stronger increase in the outcome variables compared to a self‐monitoring control group.

Findings

The results revealed that the self‐enhancement group showed a stronger increase in positive emotions and self‐efficacy compared to the control group, but not on engagement. Additional analyses showed that the positive effects of the self‐enhancement intervention are present for employees who are initially low in engagement, but not for those medium or high in engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted via a semi‐public web site. The participants were all working in different organizations throughout the country and did not have the advantage of having the support of their supervisors and colleagues who were participating in a similar intervention.

Practical implications

Positive psychology interventions should target employees who are low in engagement, because they have the most unused potential and therefore have more to gain.

Originality/value

Traditionally speaking, individual interventions are carried out when something is wrong or malfunctioning, and with the sole objective of fixing it. The intervention presented in this paper includes the entire workforce, because it is based on the belief that improving employee well‐being is relevant for all.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Katalin Ujhelyi Gomez, Jerome Carson, Gill Brown and Mark Holland

Positive psychology (PP) interventions have been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of dual diagnosis (DD). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive psychology (PP) interventions have been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of dual diagnosis (DD). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perspective of psychosocial intervention (PSI) workers to explore the potential of a positive strengths-based approach in DD recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was employed with PSI workers who attended and observed a positive intervention delivered to DD clients. A focus group explored what these practitioners are already doing that resembles PP and their opinion regarding the utility of such interventions in recovery.

Findings

Findings revealed that practitioners were already engaging in positive practice, however, randomly and infrequently with limited impact. Although this new approach was found valuable, potential challenges were identified and a possible discrepancy between staff views of clients and clients’ views of themselves in terms of their potential was detected.

Research limitations/implications

The study involved a small and homogeneous sample. Further research is necessary to investigate staff views and ways of integrating PP with traditional treatment.

Practical implications

Rather than merely attending to the psychological problems and dealing with symptoms, it is also necessary to directly target well-being to enable people to flourish with consideration of their readiness to change.

Originality/value

Addressing a gap in the literature, the present study explored positive themes in current practice and forms part of the evaluation of a newly developed strengths-based approach for individuals with coexisting problems.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article

Neil Gredecki and Polly Turner

Traditionally, the focus in psychology has been to relieve suffering in matters such as mental illness. In forensic interventions, the focus has been similar, with an…

Abstract

Traditionally, the focus in psychology has been to relieve suffering in matters such as mental illness. In forensic interventions, the focus has been similar, with an emphasis on the removal of offence‐related behaviours and thinking. That is, therapy has focused on ‘fixing’ what appears to be broken. More recent thinking in the positive psychology literature focuses on the importance of enhancing well‐being and happiness in clients and enhancing the client's own strengths and positive experiences. In turn, positive psychology adopts a strengths‐based approach to working therapeutically with clients. Positive psychology has a number of potential implications for working with forensic clients and the delivery of therapy and relapse prevention blocks. This paper will explores the potential application of positive psychology literature to offending behaviour interventions. Specifically, it focuses on the process of relapse‐prevention and self‐management, within the framework of the Self‐Regulation Model of the Relapse Process (SRM‐RP).

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Abstract

Despite the now sizable body of research documenting the importance of emotions and emotion regulation in the workplace, there is relatively little research investigating methods for improving emotional well-being in organizations. Moreover, well-being interventions that have been historically predominant in psychology are deficient in a variety of ways. In light of these deficits, researchers in other areas of psychology have begun to investigate the role of self-guided activities in enhancing the positive aspects of emotional well-being and emotion regulation. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of self-guided activities and interventions. To this end, we provide a review and discussion of various theoretical ideas and specific interventions that have been, or could be, adapted into self-guided activities to boost emotions and emotional regulation skills in the workplace. The chapter is meant to provide practical guidance to employers, organizations, and individual employees interested in using self-guided activities to improve well-being and emotion regulation at work.

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

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Book part

Stewart I. Donaldson and Maren Dollwet

During the past decade, the winds and raucous waves of positive psychology have altered the landscape and brought new life to the profession and discipline of psychology

Abstract

During the past decade, the winds and raucous waves of positive psychology have altered the landscape and brought new life to the profession and discipline of psychology. Since Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi (2000) proffered the positive psychology manifesto at the turn of the century, an amazing plethora of books, articles, research investigations, grants, awards, and applications for improving human welfare and society at large have emerged (see Donaldson, 2011a). Sheldon, Kashdan, and Steger (2011) fully described this impressive groundswell of positive psychology activity in their recent edited volume on Designing positive psychology: Taking stock and moving forward. This rapid growth of scholarly activity has also spawned new professional societies such as the International Association of Positive Psychology (http://www.ippanetwork.org/Home/), scholarly journals including the Journal of Positive Psychology (http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17439760.asp) and Journal of Happiness Studies (http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/well-being/journal/10902), and top tier graduate programs such as the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and the MA and PhD programs in Positive Organizational Psychology and Positive Developmental Psychology at Claremont Graduate University. All of these efforts share the desire to better organize and foster the continued growth and impact of positive psychology.

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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Abstract

Details

Developing Leaders for Positive Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-241-1

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Article

Katalin Ujhelyi, Jerome Carson and Mark Holland

Positive psychology is an area of rapid development in mainstream psychology, yet it has had little impact thus far in the field of dual diagnosis (DD). Effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive psychology is an area of rapid development in mainstream psychology, yet it has had little impact thus far in the field of dual diagnosis (DD). Effective treatment for clients with DD is limited, due to the lack of all-encompassing interventions that treat the two conditions simultaneously. The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to discover the prevalence of DD among users of selected drug services in Manchester; second, to explore differences between DD clients and those with substance use in hope, resilience, and well-being; and third, to identify predictors of hope, resilience, and well-being in this population.

Design/methodology/approach

The Snyder Hope Scale, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale were administered to 113 users of drug services through a convenience sampling method.

Findings

Findings from this preliminary investigation indicated that the DD group were more vulnerable as they were less hopeful, less resilient, and had poorer well-being than their counterparts.

Practical implications

This population of clients might benefit from specialized integrated treatment facilitating hope and resilience, which in turn would improve their well-being.

Originality/value

The present study addresses a gap in the literature. Although the above positive psychological aspects have been looked at in relation to mental health, and in relation to addiction, the current research explores these positive dimensions with regard to the co-occurrence of substance abuse and mental illness.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article

Chathurika Sewwandi Kannangara, David Griffiths, Jerome Carson and Samurdhi Munasinghe

– The purpose of this paper is to consider the relevance of the literature of cybernetics for a positive psychology approach to dyslexia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the relevance of the literature of cybernetics for a positive psychology approach to dyslexia.

Design/methodology/approach

A selective bibliography is presented, which reflects the exchange of ideas between the authors, two of whom work in the field of psychology, one in educational cybernetics and the other in information systems.

Findings

Examination of the literature suggests that there is scope for the application of positive psychology to dyslexia. In the cybernetic literature there is little direct discussion of either positive psychology or dyslexia. However, these areas are linked by the themes of self-steering systems and of levels of learning. Cybernetics identifies systemic constraints and therapeutic approaches which can inform the use of positive psychology techniques with dyslexics.

Originality/value

The paper documents the relevance of cybernetic analysis to the self-regulation carried out by dyslexics, and in so doing also enriches discourse on dyslexia in the field of psychology. The paper will be of value to those carrying out research into dyslexia, and to those who are supporting or working alongside people with dyslexia.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article

Teuntje R. Elfrink, Jochem M. Goldberg, Karlein M.G. Schreurs, Ernst T. Bohlmeijer and Aleisha M. Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to report on a process and impact evaluation of the Positief Educatief Programma (Positive Education Programme (PEP)), a whole school approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a process and impact evaluation of the Positief Educatief Programma (Positive Education Programme (PEP)), a whole school approach to supporting children’s well-being and creating a positive school climate in primary schools in the Netherlands. PEP adopts a competence skill enhancement approach with a focus on developing children’s positive emotions and strengths.

Design/methodology/approach

A process and impact evaluation was performed within the context of two schools piloting the programme. Employing questionnaires and interviews, the evaluation sought to examine the implementation of PEP, participants’ experiences with key components and the programme impact of PEP.

Findings

The findings reveal largely positive attitudes towards PEP. Staff and parents were positive about the core components of PEP. Results from standardised questionnaires provide preliminary evidence about the positive impact of PEP on children’s self-reported well-being and problem behaviour, teachers’ awareness of children’s strengths and overall school climate. The provision of practical strategies and activity-based resources was considered essential to the ongoing implementation of PEP.

Research limitations/implications

This study reports on findings from two implementation schools and therefore lacks generalisability. Further research using more robust research methods exploring the effectiveness of PEP when compared with “business as usual” is needed.

Originality/value

School frameworks aimed at creating a positive school climate and promoting well-being at the whole school level have not been carried out in the Netherlands to date. The results from this study provide a unique insight into the implementation and perceived impact of a whole school framework in the context of two primary schools.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part

Simon L. Albrecht

The application of positive psychology to the context of work has attracted enormous interest within both academic and practitioner domains over the past decade (e.g.…

Abstract

The application of positive psychology to the context of work has attracted enormous interest within both academic and practitioner domains over the past decade (e.g., Keyes & Haidt, 2003; Linley, Harrington, & Garcea, 2010; Luthans, 2002). From a practitioner perspective, there has been a proliferation of organizational development, human resource, talent management, leadership development, team development and coaching programs, initiatives, and interventions that have positive psychological principles at their core. The Gallup organization, for instance, has administered the Clifton Strengths Finder in thousands of organizations across the globe, aiming to help people learn about and build upon their talents and strengths to enhance all facets of their working experience (see Clifton & Harter, 2003).

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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