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Article

Beth St. Jean, Mega Subramaniam, Natalie Greene Taylor, Rebecca Follman, Christie Kodama and Dana Casciotti

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether/how youths’ pre-existing beliefs regarding health-related topics influence their online searching behaviors, such as their…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether/how youths’ pre-existing beliefs regarding health-related topics influence their online searching behaviors, such as their selection of keywords and search results, their credibility assessments and the conclusions they draw and the uses they make (or do not make) of the information they find. More specifically, we sought to determine whether positive hypothesis testing occurs when youth search for health information online and to ascertain the potential impacts this phenomenon can have on their search behaviors, their ability to accurately answer health-related questions and their confidence in their answers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory field experiment was conducted with participants in an after-school program (“HackHealth”), which aims to improve the health literacy skills and health-related self-efficacy of middle-school students from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds.

Findings

Evidence of positive hypothesis testing among the participants was found and important impacts on their search outcomes were observed.

Practical implications

The paper was concluded with suggestions for improving digital literacy instruction for youth so as to counteract the potentially negative influences of positive hypothesis testing.

Originality/value

This study extends existing research about positive hypothesis testing to investigate the existence and impact of this phenomenon within the context of tweens (ages 11-14) searching for health information online.

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Article

Richard L. Henshel

Briefly reviews the standard Poisson distribution and then examines a set of derivative, modified Poisson distributions for testing hypotheses derived from positive

Abstract

Briefly reviews the standard Poisson distribution and then examines a set of derivative, modified Poisson distributions for testing hypotheses derived from positive deviation‐amplifying feedback models, which do not lend themselves to ordinary statistically based hypothesis testing. The “reinforcement” or “contagious” Poisson offers promise for a subset of such models, in particular those models with data in the form of rates (rather than magnitudes). The practical difficulty lies in distinguishing reinforcement effects from initial heterogeneity, since both can form negative binomial distributions, with look‐alike data. Illustrates these difficulties, and also opportunities, for various feedback models employing the self‐fulfilling prophecy, and especially for confidence loops, which incorporate particular self‐fulfilling prophecies as part of a larger dynamic process. Describes an actual methodology for testing hypotheses regarding confidence loops with the aid of a “reinforcement” Poisson distribution, as well as its place within sociocybernetics.

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Article

Charles Jebarajakirthy and Paramaporn Thaichon

The leading multinational companies tend to expand their marketing activities to bottom of pyramid (BOP) market. The BOP market comprises many segments, however, little is…

Abstract

Purpose

The leading multinational companies tend to expand their marketing activities to bottom of pyramid (BOP) market. The BOP market comprises many segments, however, little is known about the purchase behaviour of BOP market or segments therein. Microcredit provides credit access to customers in BOP market. The purpose of this paper is to investigate youth’s intentions of obtaining microcredit in the post-war era, which could be a segment of BOP market.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised 1,250 youth aged 18-27 selected from the Northern Province of Sri Lanka. Surveys were administered for data collection. After testing measurement model, two structural models – full model and non-mediated model (direct effects model) were run to test hypotheses.

Findings

Positive affect, subjective norms, entrepreneurial desire and self-identity enhanced intentions of obtaining microcredit, whereas perceived deterrents reduced those intentions. Additionally, self-identity mediated the association between positive affect, entrepreneurial desire, perceived behavioural control and knowledge of microcredit, and intentions of obtaining microcredit.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted amongst youth in one country. Also, the data were cross-sectional. Hence, the model needs testing with youth and adults in other post-war contexts and with longitudinal data.

Practical implications

The findings of this study inform how effectively microcredit can be marketed to youth in post-war contexts and to the other segments of BOP market.

Originality/value

A unique purchase behavioural model is suggested with the mediating role of self-identity, to enhance intentions of obtaining microcredit in BOP markets, such as youth in post-war contexts. This study contributes to literature relating to purchase behaviour and self-identity, with particular reference to BOP market.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article

Charles Jebarajakirthy, Antonio C. Lobo and Chandana Hewege

Bottom of pyramid market (BOP) has gained attention of researchers and marketers in recent years. The BOP market comprises many segments, however, little is known about…

Abstract

Purpose

Bottom of pyramid market (BOP) has gained attention of researchers and marketers in recent years. The BOP market comprises many segments, however, little is known about purchase behaviour in BOP market or segments therein. The purpose of this paper is to investigate youth's intentions of seeking microcredit in the post-war era that are an integral part of BOP market.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised 1,250 youth aged 18 and above from Northern Province of Sri Lanka. Surveys were administered for data collection. After testing measurement model, a structural model was run to test hypotheses.

Findings

Positive affect, subjective norms and entrepreneurial desire enhanced intentions of seeking microcredit, whereas perceived deterrents negatively influenced those intentions. Perceived benefits, perceived behavioural control and knowledge of microcredit did not have significant effects on these intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in one war-affected country, Sri Lanka. Also, data were cross-sectional. Hence the model needs replication amongst youth in other post-conflict contexts and with longitudinal data.

Practical implications

Findings of this study would be of use to market microcredit to youth in post-conflict era and other segments of BOP.

Originality/value

A unique purchase behavioural model is suggested to enhance youths’ intentions of seeking microcredit in the post-war era, a segment within the BOP market. This study can contribute to purchase behaviour literature in identified contexts.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Yong Kuan and Yahaya Ahmad

Architecture influences people and the environment from the past, present and the future. Nevertheless architecture and design quality is viewed as subjective, and…

Abstract

Architecture influences people and the environment from the past, present and the future. Nevertheless architecture and design quality is viewed as subjective, and benchmarks to achieve consensus are necessary for design or evaluation of buildings. This paper establishes architectural design criteria for design quality of multi-storey housing buildings. A set of the criteria was established with literature review, an operational definition and survey on qualified persons or architects in the professional practice of architecture. The literature reviews identified seven concepts for architecture and design quality, and the operational definition translated this architectural design quality to measurable and observable cases and variables. The survey collected these variable data from a purposive sample of 95 respondents, and these data were examined by statistical analysis. The results of the descriptive statistics, inferential t-tests (p ≤ 0.05) and positive hypothesis testing verified that respondents in general agreed to these seven design concepts as architectural design criteria for design quality. These results established the first ever set of seven architectural design criteria which were ranked in descending order of significance as function, socio-culture, site context, cost, aesthetic of art, sustainability, and Feng Shui. These architectural design criteria can be applied to the design or evaluation of multi-storey housing buildings for the good of people and the environment.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article

Patturaja Selvaraj and Jerome Joseph

Extant literature shows that employee voice has ambiguous effects on organizational outcome. Especially because employee voice challenges the status quo, it can attract…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature shows that employee voice has ambiguous effects on organizational outcome. Especially because employee voice challenges the status quo, it can attract retaliation and lead to silencing of the employee. Thus, rather than producing change, employee voice can lead to increase in workplace tensions. On the other hand, employee voice also has positive consequences such as building a partnership-based culture between supervisors and employees. The purpose of this article is to reconcile these contradictory findings by reinforcing voice as having a deliberative dimension which fosters a harmonious dialogue around workplace issues.

Design/methodology/approach

We surveyed 628 managers working in organizations across different industrial relations contexts in India. Managers working in different sectors were chosen so that we could examine the consequences of employee voice across contexts with differing trade union strengths. We adopted a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach to test the effect of employee voice on environment for innovation.

Findings

We find that trust in senior management and relationship between employees and their supervising managers mediate the relationship between employee voice and environment for innovation. The findings in the article do reconcile an important dilemma about employee voice. Earlier studies have argued that employee voice is a mechanism for engaging with the dissatisfaction that employees may have in their workplaces. Our study indicates that when deliberative elements are incorporated into employee voice it is no longer merely a means for addressing dissatisfaction but constructively contributes to positive organizational outcomes such as environment for innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The effects of employee voice on environment for innovation can be understood more clearly by adopting a longitudinal research design. The findings of this article are limited by the cross-sectional frame of research design adopted. The scale that is developed for employee voice needs more validation in other international contexts.

Practical implications

This study provides a framework through which employee voice can be shifted from adversarial frames of reference to harmonious and partnership-based forms of engagement. This also has the potential to transform the role of trade unions inside organizations and build a more collaborative edifice between multiple stakeholders. Another implication is that when voice is seen in a deliberative fashion it can lead to improved environment for innovation.

Originality/value

The purpose of this study is to contribute to reconceptualization of employee voice by contending that deliberative issues are an important part of transforming the status quo. Consequently, the patterns of deliberation structure constructive partnerships between different organizational stakeholders who may be perceived as having hostile relationships with each other. This study reconciles previous findings which suggested that employee voice can have negative consequences such as retaliation by suggesting that positive consequences of employee voice are contingent on its deliberative component.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article

Guido Orzes, Fu Jia, Marco Sartor and Guido Nassimbeni

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the relationship between the adoption of Social Accountability 8000 (SA8000) – which is considered the most important ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the relationship between the adoption of Social Accountability 8000 (SA8000) – which is considered the most important ethical certification standard – and firm performance, building on agency and contingency theories.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyse secondary longitudinal balance sheet data of listed firms employing a rigorous event-study approach and compare SA8000-certified companies to different control groups based on three matching criteria, i.e., industry, size, and pre-certification performance. The authors then study the moderating effects of the cultural features, the country’s development level, and the labour intensity on the causal relationship through multiple regression methods.

Findings

The authors find that SA8000 certification positively affects labour productivity and sales performance but has no effect on profitability. Furthermore, the study supports that the relationship between SA8000 and profitability is moderated by two cultural features of the home country of the firms (i.e. power distance and uncertainty avoidance).

Originality/value

This is the first study, which empirically tests the effects of the ethical certification SA8000 on firm performance using a cross-country sample. In addition, the authors contribute to the wider debate on the effects of corporate social responsibility practices on firm performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article

Fei Kang and Han Zhang

Substantial research has examined the pivotal role of ethical leadership in generating employee outcomes. To date, though, little is known about the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

Substantial research has examined the pivotal role of ethical leadership in generating employee outcomes. To date, though, little is known about the relationship between ethical leadership and newcomers' adjustment. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this gap by examining the effect of ethical leadership on newcomers' adjustment. In doing so, the authors highlighted positive emotions of newcomers as a mediating mechanism that explains the aforementioned association.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were drawn from a two-wave sample of 271 newcomers. The hypotheses were tested by using hierarchical regression analyses and Hayes' PROCESS macro.

Findings

The results demonstrated that ethical leadership affects employees' positive emotions which, in turn, positively relates to newcomers' adjustment. Additionally, newcomers' social comparison orientation moderated the effect of ethical leadership on newcomers' positive emotions.

Research limitations/implications

The research uses a correlational research design, making it difficult to derive causal inferences from the data. Moreover, the data we obtained on the variables were all based on employees' self-reports, which might inflate the relationship between some of the variables.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first study that illustrates the role of ethical leadership in enhancing both newcomers’ positive emotions and adjustment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Book part

David Ng and Mehdi Sadeghi

This paper studies the empirical application of an asset pricing model derived from the irrational individual behavior of loss aversion. Previous research using loss…

Abstract

This paper studies the empirical application of an asset pricing model derived from the irrational individual behavior of loss aversion. Previous research using loss aversion asset pricing finds conclusive evidence that estimations match market equity premium and volatility using simulation data. We find that within its empirical application, the estimated errors are comparable to errors estimated from the capital asset pricing model. This study of the correlations between rational and irrational asset pricing model from the empirical results finds validity for both estimated values. Finally, we see the importance of cultures, economic development and financial development on asset pricing through an empirical examination of five pacific-basin countries in the estimation of asset pricing models.

Details

Asia Pacific Financial Markets in Comparative Perspective: Issues and Implications for the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-258-0

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Article

Sigitas Urbonavicius, Vytautas Dikcius, Karina Adomaviciute and Ignas Urbonavicius

Movie piracy is triggered by the release delay of new movies in various countries, especially if novelty awareness is considered an asset among peers. Therefore, novelty…

Abstract

Purpose

Movie piracy is triggered by the release delay of new movies in various countries, especially if novelty awareness is considered an asset among peers. Therefore, novelty seeking becomes a relevant factor in the illegal downloading of movies, especially among a younger population that has a higher propensity to novelty seeking. The purpose of this paper is to study novelty seeking in the context of illegal downloading of movies among a young population. More specifically, this study will highlight the relation of novelty seeking with the frequency of illegal downloading of movies and attitudes towards piracy in general.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data that were obtained via survey in Lithuania. The use of SEM allowed development of a model that integrates novelty seeking with the more typical factors of digital piracy.

Findings

The study shows a relation between novelty seeking, attitudes towards piracy and the frequency of illegal downloading of movies.

Originality/value

The study shows the importance of novelty seeking in the context of movie piracy. It specifies the relation of novelty seeking with attitude and behaviour, highlighting directions for further research.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

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