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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Robert G. Hamlin and Lesley Sage

Most past research on formal mentoring has investigated its antecedents, outcomes and benefits with little attention given to what goes on inside the dyadic relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Most past research on formal mentoring has investigated its antecedents, outcomes and benefits with little attention given to what goes on inside the dyadic relationship. The purpose of this paper is to explore the types of mentor and mentee behaviours that are perceived as critical factors contributing to either a positive or negative mentoring experience for the mentee and the mentor.

Design/methodology/approach

Concrete examples of “effective” and “ineffective” mentor and mentee behaviour were collected from the research participants using Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique (CIT). The obtained CIT data were analyzed using forms of open and axial coding. Variants of content analysis were then used for conducting a series of subsequent comparative analyses.

Findings

From a total of 187 coded critical incidents the study identified 11 positive and four negative behavioural criteria of mentoring effectiveness as perceived from the mentee perspective, and nine positive and three negative behavioural criteria of mentoring effectiveness as perceived from the mentor perspective. Comparisons against “theoretical” and “best practice” models and taxonomies of positive and negative mentoring reveal varying degrees of overlap and commonality.

Research limitations/implications

There are two main limitations. First, the number of research participants was at the bottom end of the typical sample range for qualitative research, which means the collection of critical incidents did not reach the point of data saturation. Second, the study explored the “start‐up” and “ongoing” phases of the mentoring lifecycle but not the “end” phase.

Originality/value

The findings provide new insights into mentor and mentee behavioural effectiveness within formal mentoring relationships, and thereby add to a sparse empirical knowledge base in this substantially neglected area of mentoring research. Also, they provide a foundation against which to compare and contrast future empirical research that may be conducted on perceived effective and ineffective mentor and mentee behaviours within formal mentoring relationships.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Irit Levy-Feldman

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new conception of the “good teacher” – that of the teacher-as-mentor, or, as the author refer to it, the “mentoring teacher,” who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new conception of the “good teacher” – that of the teacher-as-mentor, or, as the author refer to it, the “mentoring teacher,” who is equipped with heutagogical skills aimed at promoting self-determined learning through dialogic teaching. This conception appears to be better suited than current conceptions for the twenty-first century and the postmodern era.

Design/methodology/approach

The conception is based on an interpretative textual analysis of western educational philosophies and of the nature of postmodernity.

Findings

The mentoring teacher, presented to be the “good teacher” for the new era, is provided with skills associated with heutagogy: a pedagogical approach that emphasizes the individual’s need to learn autonomously and independently and that regards the capacity to do so as a basic skill for living and lifelong learning in the changing world. Using dialogic teaching, mentoring teachers equipped with heutagogical skills can navigate their teaching to promote the self-learning abilities of different learners and better prepare them to navigate the challenges of the current era.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents one perspective on looking at the changes that have occurred in the conception of the good teacher in western society and offers one point of view of the image of the new good teacher, hoping it might stimulate new thinking on the need to reconsider the role of the teacher in contemporary western society.

Originality/value

Placing the focus on teachers’ skills as opposed to students’ needs, which is much more common, invites discussion regarding the image of the good teacher and teacher education.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2019

Leah K. Hamilton, Jennifer Boman, Harris Rubin and Balreen K. Sahota

The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of a formal university mentorship program that paired junior and senior (third and fourth year) undergraduate student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of a formal university mentorship program that paired junior and senior (third and fourth year) undergraduate student mentees with mentors from industry. Specifically, the researchers examined the effects of mentorship on mentees’ psychological sense of community at the university, and job search self-efficacy (confidence).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used a mixed-methods design that incorporated survey data and qualitative data from interviews and focus groups. Where relevant, mentees were compared to a control group of students who did not participate in the mentorship program.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the mentees accrued several benefits from participating in the mentorship program. For mentees (but not the control group), job search self-efficacy increased over time as a result of participating in the program. Mentees valued receiving practical career-related support such as opportunities for networking, resume development and job interviewing skills. Mentees also gained a more realistic view about the workplace and their potential career options, and received important psychosocial support from their mentor.

Originality/value

Results suggest that junior and senior undergraduate student mentees gained professional and career-related benefits including increased job search self-efficacy from participation in a mentorship program that paired them with mentors from industry. In addition, the qualitative results indicate that mentees reported psychosocial benefits including an increased sense of connection to the university. Altogether, results indicate that undergraduate students experience positive outcomes from participating in mentorship programs designed to prepare them for the transition from university to the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Suhaib Aamir, Nuray Fatma Atsan and Ayfer Ferda Erdem

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the course of entrepreneurship education (EE) research within the framework of entrepreneurship. The study is based on the results…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the course of entrepreneurship education (EE) research within the framework of entrepreneurship. The study is based on the results of previous research published in the annual double special issues of Education + Training (E+T) journal. In this context, it examines the role of EE at different levels of education; EE interactions and approaches; the effects of the variety of variables on EE; and the grouping of these variables into clusters.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses literature review to categorize 59 papers into clusters based on the associations of different variables to EE which have been extracted from the annual double special issues of E+T journal. These special issues were published during the period of 2011–2018. All the reviewed papers were empirical in nature.

Findings

The study has identified 47 variables from 59 empirical papers, which have been grouped into 6 clusters around EE. Based on different levels of studies such as primary, secondary and tertiary levels, the examined papers discuss a variety of variables with reference to their positive, negative, significant or non-significant relationships to EE.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the progress of the knowledge produced with regard to EE research in recent years. It is among the very few studies to focus on the discrete collection of special issue papers.

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Barret Katuna

Abstract

Details

Degendering Leadership in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-130-3

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Lillian T. Eby, Melissa M. Robertson and David B. Facteau

Interest in employee mindfulness has increased dramatically in recent years, fueled by several important conceptual articles, numerous studies documenting the benefits of…

Abstract

Interest in employee mindfulness has increased dramatically in recent years, fueled by several important conceptual articles, numerous studies documenting the benefits of mindfulness for employee outcomes, and the adoption of mindfulness-based practices in many Fortune 500 organizations. Despite this growing interest, the vast majority of research on employee mindfulness has taken an intrapersonal focus, failing to appreciate the ways in which mindfulness may enhance work-related relational processes and outcomes. The authors explore possible associations between mindfulness and relationally oriented workplace phenomena, drawing from interdisciplinary scholarship examining mindfulness in romantic relationships, child–parent relationships, patient–healthcare provider relationships, and student–teacher relationships. A framework is proposed that links mindfulness to three distinct relationally oriented processes, which are expected to have downstream effects on work-related relational outcomes. The authors then take the proposed framework and discuss possible extensions to a variety of unique workplace relationships and discuss critical next steps in advancing the relational science of mindfulness.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Steven H. Appelbaum, Michael Bregman and Peter Moroz

The use of reinforcement and punishment have been studied extensively in laboratory and organizational settings. It has been found that positive reinforcement is the most…

Abstract

The use of reinforcement and punishment have been studied extensively in laboratory and organizational settings. It has been found that positive reinforcement is the most effective way to achieve the required behavior. Many theories and models have been developed in order to explain the relationship between punishment and fear and it has been found that these are correlated. The use of punishment and fear in the organizational setting has proved to be ineffective and undesirable. Managers must try to create an environment and climate where employees can express their full potential and respond to difficult challenges by letting go of fear of failure, fear of change, or fear of risk taking. Human resource management offers some alternatives and programs to assist in executing this task.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Barret Katuna

Abstract

Details

Degendering Leadership in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-130-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Sabre Cherkowski and Keith Walker

Building on findings from research designed to bring to description teachers’ own understandings of what it means to flourish in their work, the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on findings from research designed to bring to description teachers’ own understandings of what it means to flourish in their work, the purpose of this paper is to show how principals and teacher–leaders in schools are agents capable of building developmental relationships and mentoring cultures that can orient and support teachers toward well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is anchored with findings from a multi-year qualitative research project that was designed using perspectives from positive organizational studies and positive psychology scholarship. The research methods encompassed collaborative and generative use of appreciative inquiry and strength-based research activities in school districts in both British Columbia and Saskatchewan, Canada. Data used to build this conceptual paper are from appreciative focus group conversations with teachers and principals over the course of two years. Conversations were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using the research literature framing the study.

Findings

This paper offers four domains of inquiry and a model for flourishing schools that encourages principals and teacher–leaders to develop habits of mind and heart to build developmental relationships in ways that help both mentors and mentees to embody and enact positive, appreciative and generative ways of noticing, nurturing and sustaining the work of teaching and learning; all with aspiration to sustain and enhance the well-being of every member of the school community.

Practical implications

This paper offers conceptual models and storied descriptions that can aid mentors in noticing and nurturing more developmental relationship approaches to mentoring for well-being as opportunities to build mentoring relationships from appreciative and growth-based habits and approaches. As these relationships are built across the school, positive mentoring cultures may foster and grow in ways that promotes a flourishing-for-all approach to teaching and learning.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a different and complimentary perspective to research and practice on mentoring, offering a positive organizational perspective that highlights and promotes the perceived and evidenced benefits of deliberately focusing on what goes well and what provokes vitality in schools. The conceptual models in this paper offer tools for mentors and mentees to develop and foster in others appreciative and positive capacities for positive mentoring.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Julie Posselt

Rising rates of anxiety and depression and the varied costs of these conditions indicate a clear need to create learning environments in which graduate and professional…

Abstract

Purpose

Rising rates of anxiety and depression and the varied costs of these conditions indicate a clear need to create learning environments in which graduate and professional students can more readily thrive. However, the absence of multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary evidence about mental health in graduate education has obscured a clear picture of which populations, contexts and social dynamics merit focused attention and resources. The purpose of this study is therefore to analyze prevalence and risk factors associated with anxiety and depression among a large sample of graduate students, with special attention to how graduate education environments and interactions may be associated with mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers the first multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary analysis of depression and anxiety among US graduate and professional students. Using a sample of 20,888 students randomly sampled within 69 universities, the author compares depression and anxiety prevalence among fields of study with hierarchical cluster modeling. Then, using a conceptual framework that links social support, role strain and self-determination theories, the author estimates fixed effects multivariate logistic regressions to measure how depression and anxiety are associated with experiencing racial discrimination, support from friends and family, perceived competitiveness in one’s classes, and comfort speaking with one’s professors about mental health.

Findings

Graduate students who endure frequent racial discrimination have odds of screening positive for depression and anxiety that are 2.3 and 3.0 times higher, respectively, than those who never experience discrimination. Support from family and friends moderates these relationships and perceived competitiveness exacerbates them. LGBTQ students and students who self-report that finances are a struggle or tight also have higher odds of depression and anxiety. Students in the humanities, arts and architecture have significantly higher prevalence of depression and anxiety than the sample as a whole.

Originality/value

The paper offers broadest base of evidence to date about patterns that are usually experienced at the individual level or analyzed institution-by-institution and field-by-field. Specifically, the author identified social dynamics, fields of study and populations where attention to wellbeing may be especially warranted. The conceptual framework and multivariate results clarify how organizational and individual factors in graduate students’ mental health may be intertwined through competitive, discriminatory, or supportive interactions with peers, faculty, family and friends. Findings clarify a need for awareness of the contexts and interactions that graduate students experience as well as individual factors that are associated with student wellbeing.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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