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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2020

Stavros P. Kalafatis, Charles Blankson, Marvyn Luxly Boatswain and Markos H. Tsogas

Grounded in regulatory mode theory (RMT), this study aims to investigate the impact of managers’ orientation for action (locomotion and assessment) in business-to-business…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in regulatory mode theory (RMT), this study aims to investigate the impact of managers’ orientation for action (locomotion and assessment) in business-to-business positioning decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected using a scenario-based experimental design. Study 1 examines whether interest and involvement in recommending a positioning strategy depends on a manager’s regulatory mode orientation. The impact of such orientations on the likelihood of changing a recommended positioning strategy is the focus of Study 2. The moderating effects of task motivation (expected rewards resulting from a recommendation), market feedback and the line manager’s leadership style are examined.

Findings

Both assessment and locomotion are significant determinants of involvement in recommending a positioning strategy. The introduction of motivation as a moderator helps explain differences in level of interest in positioning decision-making. Locomotion, but not assessment, affects the likelihood of changing a recommended positioning strategy. Assessment amplifies the impact of locomotion, while none of the interaction effects between regulatory mode orientation and contextual factors is a significant determinant of changing a positioning strategy.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first application of RMT on positioning decision-making. Results from two experiments provide novel insights into the predictive relevance of managers’ preference in terms of involvement with the decision-making process and the likelihood of altering positioning.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

John C. Mowen

This article proposes that consumer purchase behavior may be viewed from three perspectives — the decision making, the experiential, and the behavioral influence. The…

Abstract

This article proposes that consumer purchase behavior may be viewed from three perspectives — the decision making, the experiential, and the behavioral influence. The decision‐making perspective holds that buying behavior results from consumers' engaging in a problem‐solving task in which they move through a series of stages. The experiential perspective argues that in certain instances consumers make purchases in order to create feelings, experiences, and emotions rather than to solve problems. The behavioral influence approach proposes that in other instances consumers act in response to environmental pressures. Each approach can be linked to the predominant effect of one of the three components of the classic hierarchy of effects. Managerial implications of the three perspectives on consumer buying behavior are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Vincenza Priola and Lara Pecis

This study aims to explore the role of Italian women in society and at work during the pandemic. Specifically, it analyses Italian women’s positioning in the work context…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of Italian women in society and at work during the pandemic. Specifically, it analyses Italian women’s positioning in the work context and in the leadership coordinating the national response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by feminist thinking addressing recent debates on women’s livelihoods at the time of Covid-19, the study focusses on Italy’s gendered response to the pandemic and its exclusion of women from decision-making roles in the management of the pandemic and the subsequent post-pandemic socio-economic recovery. Drawing on recent studies and media contributions it provides a thought-provoking analysis embedded in the country’s history and culture.

Findings

Despite their high involvement in the daily management of the pandemic, as key workers and family carers, Italian women’s voices have remained unheard and concealed, even in face of movements towards their recognition (#DateciVoce). This study trace this lack of inclusion in the sedimented gender inequalities characteristic of the Italian socio-political-economic context, combined with the effects of Covid-19. This study suggest that the country needs a long overdue and radical shift towards the centring of women and their contributions in work and society.

Originality/value

The study offers insights into the gendered pandemic response of one of the first and worst affected countries. It specifically addresses women’s continued marginalisation in the political arena vis-à-vis their key role in supporting the country’s economy.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Li Baoku, Zhai Cuixia and Bao Weimin

This paper aims to determine Chinese peasant consumers' decision‐making styles.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine Chinese peasant consumers' decision‐making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on the psychological orientation and decision‐making styles of peasants' purchase of durable appliances. This has the dual character of purchase behavior by the study on factor analysis from a view of peasants' consumption psychology. The consumer style inventory (CSI) was administered in January 2009 to 5,827 peasants in 656 villages in 14 provinces which were selected randomly in China. Both an exploratory factor analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis are adopted to validate the CSI inventory. This results in a 25‐item and eight‐factor solution.

Findings

Findings indicate that three consumer segments are formed: confused by over choice peasant consumer; fashion and impulsive peasant consumer; and perfect peasant consumer. The income effect on a farmer's purchasing has a threshold, while income does not reach the limit, income does not have an obvious effect on the decision‐making styles of peasants' purchasing on durable appliances, the category of consumer styles depends on the “individual” factor of peasants' consumption psychology, and their consumption behavior characteristics depend on the grade of psychological orientation and decision‐making styles of the consumer.

Practical implications

The marketing mix of an enterprise should recognize the potential differences of psychology of the peasant consumer. Enterprises should adopt positive marketing strategies in pricing to induce and inspire consumer motivation and behavior, so that enterprises can positively interact with rural consumers and achieve optimal allocation of marketing resources.

Originality/value

This paper decribes the decision‐making styles of Chinese peasant consumers based on their purchasing behavior with regard to consumer and consumption psychology. The effect of annual average income and income source of the family on the consumers' decision‐making styles is not obvious, but the number of people in a family has some effect on consumers' decision‐making styles.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Jim McLoughlin, Jaime Kaminski, Babak Sodagar, Sabina Khan, Robin Harris, Gustavo Arnaudo and Sinéad Mc Brearty

The purpose of this paper is to develop a coherent and robust methodology for social impact measurement of social enterprises (SEs) that would provide the conceptual and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a coherent and robust methodology for social impact measurement of social enterprises (SEs) that would provide the conceptual and practical bases for training and embedding.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a holistic impact measurement model for SEs, called social impact for local economies (SIMPLEs). The SIMPLE impact model and methodology have been tried and tested on over 40 SEs through a series of three day training courses, and a smaller number of test cases for embedding. The impact model offers a five‐step approach to impact measurement called SCOPE IT; MAP IT; TRACK IT; TELL IT and EMBED IT. These steps help SE managers to conceptualise the impact problem; identify and prioritise impacts for measurement; develop appropriate impact measures; report impacts and embed the results in management decision making.

Findings

Preliminary qualitative feedback from participants reveals that while the SIMPLE impact training delivers positive learning experiences on impact measurement and prompts, in the majority of cases, the intensions to implement impact systems, the majority feels the need for follow up embedding support. Paricipant's see value in adopting the SIMPLE approach to support business planning processes. Feedback from two SEs which has receives in‐house facilitates embedding support clearly demonstrates the benefits of working closely with an organisation's staff team to enable effective implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Some key future research challenges are identified as follows: systematically research progress in implementation after training for those participants that do not have facilitated embedding; to further test and develop embedding processes and models (using SIMPLE and other methods) with more SE organisations to identify best practices.

Originality/value

The SIMPLE fills a gap as a tool for holistic impact thinking that offers try and test accessible steps, with robust measures. The innovative steps take SEs through all key impact thought processes from conceptualisation to embedding guidance, feeding into business planning and strategic decision‐making processes. The comparison between the limitations of stand alone impact training and the benefits of facilitated embedding processes is instructive.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Sarra Dahmani, Xavier Boucher, Didier Gourc, Sophie Peillon and François Marmier

The paper proposes an innovative systemic method helping decision-makers to control servitization transition process, through decision process risk diagnosis.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper proposes an innovative systemic method helping decision-makers to control servitization transition process, through decision process risk diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed method is based on the modeling of decision processes and risk identification and analysis. This method was based on an action-research approach, in close relationship with two companies (SMEs). The paper develops the feasibility experiment at Automelec company.

Findings

The method was successfully implemented and delivered concrete diagnosis results.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of the applicability of the method needs to be tested on several different cases.

Practical implications

The first practical implication is related to the efficiency of the method to help decision-makers in a servitization context to limit uncertainty and get a global view of the weaknesses of their decision-making process, it raises their awareness about servitization transition for their companies. Furthermore, the method also helps to explain the strategy of a servitization transition. It enhances the level of maturity of the decision process of the company, and can be used as a training/learning tool for managers.

Social implications

The results brought by the research contribute to give the decision-making boards for organization living a servitization transition and especially SMEs a better control over the servitization decision process and related risks, which will increase the economic stability of the company and its vision over long, medium and short horizons. This will bring positive impact on the overall economic and social environment and networks of the servitized SME, and enhance the confidence of coworkers, subcontractors and clients.

Originality/value

The first originality of the paper is related to the new way of considering risk, not only as an analysis criterion but as the central driver in steering a strategic transition for the company, such as servitization. The second originality of the study is about assessing risk occurrence over a decision-making process through decision reliability and decision confidence.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Tak Wing Yiu and Yuet Nog Chung

In construction, the involvement of complex human interactions and incompatible interests among negotiating parties would pose as an obstacle in any negotiation process…

Abstract

Purpose

In construction, the involvement of complex human interactions and incompatible interests among negotiating parties would pose as an obstacle in any negotiation process. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of face in governing the behaviour of negotiating parties.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identified the generic types of face-saving tactics used by construction negotiators, investigated the tactic-outcome relationships and examined the effects of face-inducement factors on these relationships with the use of moderated multiple regression (MMR).

Findings

A taxonomy of face-saving tactics has been developed by employing the technique of principal component of factor analysis. The results suggest that the use of face-saving tactics in construction negotiation would statistically result in an achievement of mutual agreement, maintenance of harmony and avoidance of offending situations. The MMR models finally affirm that some tactic-outcome relationships would significantly depend on the face-inducement factors.

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the usefulness of face-saving tactics in construction negotiation.

Practical implications

The findings revealed that these tactics can help facilitate the achievement of mutual agreement, maintain harmony and avoid offending situations. In this connection, an awareness of the proper use of face-saving tactics is worth-noticing in order to have successful dealings in negotiating project disputes.

Originality/value

In construction, there are some distinct features which may influence the use of face-saving tactics and the behaviour of project dispute negotiators. The findings of this research would provide an insight into promoting proactive and collaborative project dispute resolution.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Roland Y.G. Lim, Tim Baines, Benny Tjahjono and Watcharavee Chandraprakaikul

The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation into the selection and evaluation of a suitable strategic positioning methodology for SMEs in Singapore.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation into the selection and evaluation of a suitable strategic positioning methodology for SMEs in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is based on critical review of the literature to identify the potentially most suitable strategic positioning methodology, evaluation and testing of the methodology within the context of SME's in Singapore, and analysis to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the methodology and opportunities for further research.

Findings

This paper illustrates a leading integrated strategic positioning decision making process, which has been found to be potentially suitable for SMEs in Singapore, and the process is then applied and evaluated in two industrial case studies. Results in the form of strengths, weaknesses and opportunities are evaluated and discussed in detail, and further research to improve the process has been identified.

Practical implications

A practical and integrated strategic supply chain positioning methodology for SMEs to define their own competitive space, among other companies in the manufacturing supply chain, so as to maximize business competitiveness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge of the strategic positioning decision process as well as identifies further research to adapt the process for SMEs in Singapore.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Ying‐Chieh Chen, Shui‐Chuan Chen and Ying‐Hao Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the system requirements model. According to the concept of loss costs of Type I and Type II errors, it can define the optimal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the system requirements model. According to the concept of loss costs of Type I and Type II errors, it can define the optimal decision line, and reduce overall loss costs. Moreover, it can decrease the probability of Type I and Type II error by the systems thinking, and it can effectively reduce overall loss costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposed a system demand model and constructed a decision‐making system thinking model as well as a decision‐making performance management model using the principle of system demand. Types of decision‐making errors were analyzed to set judgments on the error risk and establish a model of improvement evaluation key factors, in order to reduce decision‐making error risk and enhance decision quality. It also constructed the improved decision‐making to assess the key factors, to reduce the risk of making errors in order to improve the quality of decision‐making.

Findings

Optimistic decision‐makers (risk takers) tend to make Type II errors, whereas pessimistic decision makers (conservatives) tend to make Type I errors. Financial depressions are the time for optimistic decision makers (risk takers) and boom periods are the time for pessimistic decision makers (conservatives).

Originality/value

The concept of the loss cost of two decision‐making errors and related cost function models were proposed. Decision makers could make decisions with a more stable model, taking into consideration false alarms and the cost function of errors in order to determine the position of the decision‐making line. It could effectively reduce decision‐making error costs and increase the precision of decision‐making.

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Anette Nyqvist

In this paper the annual general meetings (AGM) of corporations are conceptualized as front-stage performances and dramas where the three roles of the corporation – the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the annual general meetings (AGM) of corporations are conceptualized as front-stage performances and dramas where the three roles of the corporation – the shareholder, manager and director – perform the corporation as a particular type of organization. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Meeting ethnography conducted at four seasons of AGMs in Sweden.

Findings

The study sheds light on how the required AGM of public companies may be seen as a ritualized, legitimizing and trust-building corporate performance where the different roles of the corporation are played out in positioning procedures and where the corporation as an organizational form is enacted.

Originality/value

The topic is of this paper is clearly original. Looking at corporations from an anthropological angle, exploring foundation myths, rites and organizational cultures, have been employed earlier, but exploring AGMs from an anthropological angle, is new.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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