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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Sarich Chotipanich and Bev Nutt

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be positioned and repositioned to meet the needs and expectations of an organisation, its staff and customers, as priorities shift and business circumstances change?

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were undertaken to investigate the precise nature and reasons for change to FM support arrangements, across a variety of organisational types and sectors. Data were collected through document searches, semi‐structured interviews, direct observations and supplementary questionnaires and follow‐up discussions. Field trials of this prototype framework were conducted to obtain expert opinions, comments, criticisms and suggestions for improvement, employing a methodology similar to that used in clinical trials for new medical procedures.

Findings

The main findings from the investigations cover the nature and purpose of change in FM and the key factors that were involved. A number of major opportunities for innovative developments in the facility management field were uncovered, together with five key areas for further research, through which to advance the role and remit of facility management generally.

Originality/value

The research here has produced a generic decision framework for positioning and repositioning FM support arrangements. This framework will enable facility managers to adopt a more secure approach for collecting essential information, identifying key issues and options, and should encourage a more rigorous and critical examination of alternative FM arrangements prior to implementation.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Sarich Chotipanich

This paper seeks to uncover major differences in current opinion concerning the purpose, scope and priorities of facility management (FM), and to indicate which key areas…

Abstract

This paper seeks to uncover major differences in current opinion concerning the purpose, scope and priorities of facility management (FM), and to indicate which key areas and factors of FM practice should be considered for inclusion in any theoretical framework for positioning FM. A literature review examines the available knowledge, theories and publications concerning linking FM to organisation and its environments from a range of published literatures. The paper identifies gaps in the existing knowledge base, and clarifies the issues for consideration and development framework for positioning FM. This paper is a part of research being undertaken for PhD study at the Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London. It has produced a theoretical framework for positioning FM which will be further developed in the next stage of the study. The theoretical framework for positioning FM provides useful ground for developing decision method and tools for positioning FM practice. This paper offers a starting point in aligning FM practice to the particular organisation systematically.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 14 November 2013

Amalia E. Maulana, Pandu Jati Kuncoro and Lexi Z. Hikmah

Reverse positioning, market segmentation, customer-centric organization.

Abstract

Subject area

Reverse positioning, market segmentation, customer-centric organization.

Study level/applicability

Postgraduate program; Master in strategic marketing and Master in business administration.

Case overview

Declining radio listenership is triggered by lack of attention of the radio managers to the desires of radio listeners. Delta FM radio, as part of Masima Media Group, is a radio that realized the need for revitalization. They changed their target audience and positioning to regain its former glory. Delta FM radio get back to the core benefit with the tagline: “100% Great Songs”. Shifting from highlighting the emotional benefits to functional benefits and to cut a variety of benefits is called “reverse positioning”.

Expected learning outcomes

The objective of this case study is to give deeper comprehension a new concept called reverse positioning or reverse branding. It is an example of the dynamic of hyper competition in media market in practice, in the emerging market such as Indonesia. It provides clear picture of the difference between listener oriented vs advertiser oriented company and the impact of the imbalance portion between them.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Emmanuel Silva Quaye and Yvonne Saini

Amongst other things, at the end of this case discussion, the student should be able to: diagnose situational factors that contribute to a brand’s positioning; explore…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Amongst other things, at the end of this case discussion, the student should be able to: diagnose situational factors that contribute to a brand’s positioning; explore important issues in implementing brand positioning strategies; use relevant models for understanding a firm’s internal and external environments to inform strategic decisions about customers and competition; demonstrate an understanding of target audience; identify the unique attributes of the competition to inform a firm’s positioning and competitive strategy.

Case overview/synopsis

Kaya FM derives its name from the isiZulu word “ikhaya”, which means “home”. The name reflects the mission of the radio station to provide a home for black South Africans who were denied many opportunities during the apartheid era in South Africa. Kaya FM has been broadcasting since 1997, following the deregulation of the media landscape in South Africa. However, by 2018, the radio landscape has become very challenging. Mainstream advertisers still do not consider Kaya FM as a preferred channel to reach their target audience. Overall, radio listenership is dwindling and advertising sales growth is not encouraging. Greg Maloka, Kaya FM’s station manager is considering how to preserve the station’s unique positioning as it competes with both more dominant stations and new entrants so that Kaya FM can truly be a home for Afropolitans for many years to come.

Complexity academic level

Honour’s and master’s level, as well as executive education delegates.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2013

Akarapong Katchamart

The purpose of this exploratory research paper is to present a product‐process matrix that assists FM organizations and their stakeholders to map their value added position

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory research paper is to present a product‐process matrix that assists FM organizations and their stakeholders to map their value added position in their organizations. Using this matrix, FM practitioners are able to assess the existing value added delivering, how it is formulated and identify actions for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops the FM value added product‐process matrix to allow comparisons between different FM products with their FM processes and illustrates their degree of value delivery. The building blocks of the matrix are an FM product structure and an FM process structure. The supporting empirical data were collected through semi‐structured interviews from selected FM organizations supplemented by relevant documents.

Findings

Based on a product‐process matrix, a typology of FM value added positions is introduced, namely, support, enable, ensure and enhance. Each position has merits and requirements under specific circumstances for its client's core business. Matching a given type of FM value added position with the appropriate FM product and process under the specific conditions is likely to create greater values to the client's core business. Meanwhile, misaligning dilutes the value delivery.

Research limitations/implications

This normative matrix can be used as a decision‐making tool for a client to assess its FM performances and activities, and to determine the needs of FM provision and services. On the other hand, an FM organization can use it as a self‐evaluation tool for evaluating its FM service/provision performances and aligning its offering with core business needs. However, the matrix needs to be validated and verified from various types of organizations.

Originality/value

This paper presents a typology of FM value added position and substantiates its applicability with empirical evidences. Although a proposed typology is formulated in a context of FM, its applications can be applied into other organizational support functions, for instance human resource (HR), information technology (IT) and finance services.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Sarich Chotipanich and Sittiporn Issarasak

This paper is a continuing exploration into facilities management (FM) strategy through the arrangement of its decision choices. The purpose of this paper is to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a continuing exploration into facilities management (FM) strategy through the arrangement of its decision choices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the existence of FM operation strategy and to add empirical evidence to this subject to the field of FM and property management. Its main objectives are to gain insights into the arrangement of the FM strategic choices in operation and its relationship with business strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated the configurations of operational approaches and activities that should reflect strategic decisions. The investigation was undertaken through a study of four reputed shopping malls located in Bangkok. The relevant data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the key FM persons of each case study, plus archival document searches, and observations of operational processes. Subsequently, the data were examined in a cross-case analysis to identify the key patterns of relationships between the FM operational arrangements and the business strategy of the mall.

Findings

This study found that the functional scheme of FM adopted in operations was deliberately related to the needs of business strategy and the operations of the given shopping mall. A range of strategic choices for FM operations was also found. Certain choices are shared among the case studies, while their arrangements varied according to the particular business strategy and context.

Research limitations/implications

The number of case studies was rather limited, while the results were predominantly involved with a single type of facility.

Originality/value

The study identified the pattern of strategic choices entailed in the FM operations in shopping malls. The findings add to the understanding on FM strategy by widening the perspectives about the strategic choices of FM operations and how they are connected with the business strategy and operation model of retail estate. It adds empirical evidence and case studies regarding FM operations and its strategic features.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Matthew Tucker and Mohd Rayme Anang Masuri

The purpose of this paper is to justify the need to integrate facilities management (FM) into the development process (DP) and establish a framework that potentially…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to justify the need to integrate facilities management (FM) into the development process (DP) and establish a framework that potentially serves as a guide to optimise the value of FM in the property development industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at the relevant literature to identify the factors that are hindering FM to effectively integrate in the DP. Subsequently, the authors intend to carry out interviews with various professionals in the property development industry in the UK to identify the best practices. This research uses qualitative and quantitative methods in order to establish an FM-DP integration framework.

Findings

The literature suggested that contribution of FM towards the property development industry is unquestionable. Surprisingly, in a real world FM has been given a low priority in the property development industry, resulting in Facilities Managers being inadequately integrated into the DP. There is currently no suitable generic mechanism that is practical in all stages of the DP to guide Facilities Managers and/or other professionals to integrate FM into the DP.

Originality/value

This study is to provide evidence that the property development industry needs a framework that potentially serves as a guide to optimise the value of FM in the DP.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Bev Nutt

This paper introduces the special issue, which includes some papers originally presented at the “Futures in Property and Facility Management II” conference in March 2004…

Abstract

This paper introduces the special issue, which includes some papers originally presented at the “Futures in Property and Facility Management II” conference in March 2004. Focuses on the themes of this and a previous conference, several years ago – “Futures in Property and Facility Management”, at University College London in June 1999. The conferences considered the strategic opportunities for property and facility management worldwide, bringing together senior facility professionals, service providers, property clients and academics to debate alternative futures. The first conference focused on four themes; new strategic directions, new performance imperatives, policy and investment and the promotion of knowledge exchange. The second “Futures” conference had four interrelated themes: possibilities for new alignments in the future, real estate dilemmas, work, time and place, and a reform debate.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Anand Kumar Jaiswal and Harit Palan

Radio Mirchi is the flagship brand of Entertainment Network India Limited (ENIL). ENIL is the largest private FM radio broadcaster in India. ENIL was able to gain a…

Abstract

Radio Mirchi is the flagship brand of Entertainment Network India Limited (ENIL). ENIL is the largest private FM radio broadcaster in India. ENIL was able to gain a stronghold in the market due to its strengths of innovativeness and creative content, large operating network, reach among listeners, high quality studio and strong advertisement sales capabilities. The case discusses Radio Mirchi's entry into the Kolkata market in 2003 amidst the competition from three other players—Red FM, Aamar and Power. Kolkata occupied a prime place in the company's growth plans. The case discusses the dilemma faced by the company on developing the entry strategy. Its top management has to decide on the market segment(s) it should target, and the design of the product.

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Erik Carl Backus and Jakob C. Bruhl

The facility decision-making process (FDMP), as described in this paper, is a framework based on decades of proven effectiveness in analogous military applications. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The facility decision-making process (FDMP), as described in this paper, is a framework based on decades of proven effectiveness in analogous military applications. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key factors which justify the need for the FDMP before describing the FDMP.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a literature review as it relates to facilities specific decision-making, puts forward a new concept for those processes and provides an abridged case study of the concept in application.

Findings

Facilities management is a key function for nearly every type of business or enterprise. As part of facilities management, many decisions are made about physical assets that a business or enterprise owns or maintains. Currently, there is no uniform decision-making framework, in literature or in practice, which enables consistency, robustness and scalability for facility management decisions. Such a framework would enable facility managers to effectively justify decisions related to capital and operational expenses.

Practical implications

The FDMP provides a robust procedure for facilities managers and engineers that enables enhanced strength in the face of business enterprise scrutiny as compared with the often-intuitive decision-making processes currently used in practice.

Originality/value

This novel conceptual process articulates the opportunity to provide for a comprehensive facilities decision-making process that enables better decisions especially as it relates to what are often ill-defined problem sets in facilities management.

Details

Facilities , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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