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1 – 10 of over 45000
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1960

In a parachute canopy the combination comprises a fabric structure of inverted bowl‐like configuration developed from a plurality of individual pieces of material. The…

Abstract

In a parachute canopy the combination comprises a fabric structure of inverted bowl‐like configuration developed from a plurality of individual pieces of material. The structure is further characterized in that portions thereof define a peak opening, and a lower peripheral edge and the inner surface thereof, in the developed shape of the structure, constitutes a spherical surface. The structure includes an annular skirt portion and at least one annular upper portion each portion having upper and lower spaced parallel edges, canopy reinforcing means. The adjacent edges of the skirt and upper portions being connected to the reinforcing means only at spaced circumferential points with the lower edge of the upper portion abutting the upper edge of the skirt portion on the reinforcing means without overlap of the portions. As assembled the upper edge of the upper portion and the lower edge of the skirt portion define the peak opening and lower peripheral edge, respectively, and the length of the lower edge of the upper portion exceeds the length of the upper edge of the skirt portion between the spaced points, whereby when the canopy is inflated, the lower edge of the upper portion and upper edge of the lower portion define crescent‐shaped openings.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Makbule Gezmen Karadağ, Duygu Ağagündüz, Hilal Yıldıran, Sabriye Arslan and Onur Toka

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perception and knowledge of standard food/meal portion size and related factors in young adults.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perception and knowledge of standard food/meal portion size and related factors in young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study was conducted on 1,000 volunteer young adults, consisting of 504 men and 496 women (18 and 28 years). The portion size of food/meal, amount of food measuring utensils and also nutritional knowledge were evaluated via a questionnaire and some visual materials.

Findings

Knowledge of portion sizes, amount of food each utensil holds and nutrition was evaluated via a questionnaire and some visual materials. Knowledge of portion size with respect to food groups (p = 0.015), meals (p < 0.001) and food measuring utensils (p = 0.002) and nutritional knowledge scores (p = 0.011) differed based on body mass indexes (BMI). Women had on mean a higher nutritional knowledge score than men (2.0 ± 1.3, 1.9 ± 1.1 points, respectively). The probability of having knowledge about food measuring utensils was 1.4-fold greater for individuals who had been previously educated about nutrition (p = 0.034). Individuals of the faculty of health sciences had higher mean scores for all portion scores (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

The study findings highlighted that portion knowledge and perception of young adults were affected by gender, BMI, enrolled faculty and nutritional knowledge status. This is the first study, through which the portion knowledge and perception subcomponents (food, meal and measuring utensils) are evaluated, indicating each subcomponent to be affected by distinct factors.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1955

For use with a turbine providing coolant for the blading, a nozzle vane comprising a root portion, a neck portion joined thereto, and a blade portion extending from said…

Abstract

For use with a turbine providing coolant for the blading, a nozzle vane comprising a root portion, a neck portion joined thereto, and a blade portion extending from said neck portion; said blade portion being partially defined by a leading edge and a trailing edge; a distributing chamber formed within said blade portion; said trailing edge having a series of openings therein; a plurality of small passages radiating from said chamber and communicating with said trailing edge; said root and neck portions being formed with a passage through them communicating with said chamber thereby providing a continuous path for the transfer of coolant from said root portion through said neck portion and said plurality of passages to said series of openings in said trailing edge.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1959

A Hollow propeller blade comprises a thrust member having an aerofoil portion with an external aerofoil thrust surface and a root portion which comprises two united…

Abstract

A Hollow propeller blade comprises a thrust member having an aerofoil portion with an external aerofoil thrust surface and a root portion which comprises two united sections, and a camber member united to the thrust member and having an external aerofoil camber surface. The root portion may comprise two united sections and the aerofoil section a third portion united to or integral with one of the sections. The root portion is formed in two sections 34, 36 welded together and each integral with a set of marginal ribs 18, 20 and intermediate ribs 22, 24, 26 which are complementary, the marginal ribs 18, 20 on the lower section 36 being stepped at 38, 40 to receive shorter marginal ribs on the section 34. Continuation ribs on the blade portion 42 are welded transversely to the ribs on the root portions, preferably using triangular inserts at the joins. The root portions 34, 36 may be of unequal size, the division being on a plane spaced from the neutral axis of the blade, the ribs of the upper portion being short and stub‐like, and the aerofoil part 42 may be integral with the lower root portion 36.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Amina Mesbeh, Marwen Jarboui and Ahmed Masmoudi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of different faulty scenarios on the induction motor (IM) operation with emphasis on the currents in the rotor bar…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of different faulty scenarios on the induction motor (IM) operation with emphasis on the currents in the rotor bar and end rings.

Design/methodology/approach

The modeling of the IM followed by a graphical representation-based analysis of the rotor steady-state currents under healthy operation is treated. Then, a case study is considered in order to investigate different faulty scenarios with a focus on the rotor cage currents.

Findings

It has been found that the rotor faults greatly affect the currents in the bars and in the end rings both in amplitude and in harmonic content. These vary according to the relative positions with respect to the fault such that: the currents in the bars adjacent to the faulty one(s) have the highest amplitudes with the lowest harmonic content; and the ones in the ring portions adjacent to the faulty one have the lowest amplitudes with the highest harmonic content.

Research limitations/implications

Although the simulated model has confirmed the well known IM behavior under healthy operation, it would be appreciated if the obtained results under faulty operation would be validated by finite element analysis.

Practical implications

It is of great interest to investigate the effects of faulty scenarios on the rotor cage currents, in order to take appropriate actions starting from the design of the IM.

Originality/value

A deep investigation (including the waveforms, the phasor diagrams and the harmonic content) of the effects of different faulty scenarios on the IM rotor cage currents represents the major contribution of this work.

Details

COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1953

In an aircraft with folding wings, the movable portions 5 are connected to the fixed portions 4 by hinges whose axes X—X1 arc inclined and located in the longitudinal…

Abstract

In an aircraft with folding wings, the movable portions 5 are connected to the fixed portions 4 by hinges whose axes X—X1 arc inclined and located in the longitudinal plane of the main spars 6, 8 of the wings. In the form shown, the hinge axes converge down‐wardly, the wing portion in front of each hinge being of stepped shape DEFG in plan, while the upper surface of the fixed wing portion 4 to the rear of the hinge is formed with a recess 9 to allow the passage of the lower edge 10 of the rear portion of the movable wing portion 5 during folding and unfolding. The undersurface of the fixed portion is formed with a horizontal extension 11 for supporting the wing portion 5, while the latter carries a flap 12 covering the recess 9 when the wing is extended. The wings may be operated by hydraulic or electric jack; 14, and remotely controlled locking devices 17, 18 may be employed for securing the wings in their extended position.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Ernest Raiklin

Studies concerning Soviet taxation demonstrate a diversity of opinions on the nature of turnover taxes. Four major views on the subject have emerged: (1) turnover taxes…

107

Abstract

Studies concerning Soviet taxation demonstrate a diversity of opinions on the nature of turnover taxes. Four major views on the subject have emerged: (1) turnover taxes are simply a sales (excise) tax on articles' of consumption sold to the Soviet consumer; (2) not all turnover taxes are a sales tax, some of them are a substitute for rent on production of certain industrial materials; (3) in addition to being a sales (excise) tax on consumer goods and rent on some industrial materials, there exists a third type of turnover tax which is levied on agricultural production of the peasantry; (4) turnover taxes are a portion of the surplus product produced in industry and agriculture.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Sarah Lefebvre and Marissa Orlowski

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of involvement in food preparation on estimated calorie content, perception of portion size and desirability of the food item.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of involvement in food preparation on estimated calorie content, perception of portion size and desirability of the food item.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, three between-subjects experiments (one online, two in a laboratory setting) were conducted. Across the three experiments, participants were presented with a food item either ready for consumption (low involvement) or with the individual ingredients in need of assembly prior to consumption (high involvement).

Findings

Results showed that when a consumer is involved in the preparation of their food, they perceive the food to be lower in calories and smaller in portion size than when the same food is presented fully prepared and ready-to-eat. In addition, the effect of food preparation involvement on perception of portion size has negative downstream consequences on food desirability, as a smaller perceived portion resulted in a less desirable food item.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, the results of this research are the first to focus on the impact of preparation involvement on perceptions of the specific product attributes of calorie content and portion size, and the downstream effect on desirability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Nicholas Ford, Paul Trott and Christopher Simms

The purpose of this paper is to explore older people’s food consumption experiences. Specifically, the paper seeks to provide understanding on the influence of food intake…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore older people’s food consumption experiences. Specifically, the paper seeks to provide understanding on the influence of food intake on consumer vulnerability and how this manifests within people’s lives.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an interpretive, exploratory approach, using in-depth interviews with 20 older consumers in the UK. Thematic analysis is conducted, establishing patterns and contradictions with the data.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how biological, psychological and social age-related changes can contribute to reduced food intake in later life. The loss of control over one’s consumption experiences as a result of inappropriate portion sizes acts as a source of both immediate and future vulnerability. Resultant food wastage can serve as an immediate reminder of negative associates with ageing, while the accumulative effect of sustained under-consumption contributes to increased frailty. As a result, consumer vulnerability can pervade other contexts of an individual’s life.

Practical implications

The research reveals opportunities for firms to use packaging development to reduce experiences of consumer vulnerability through reduced apportionment of packaged food products. However, this needs to be considered within a multi-demographic marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by providing a unique lens with which to understand consumer vulnerability. The findings offer a developmental perspective on the experience of consumer vulnerability, revealing the stages of proximate, immediate, intermediate and ultimate vulnerability. This perspective has the potential to offer more detailed, nuanced insights into vulnerability in other contexts beyond food consumption.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1956

An aircraft comprising a fuselage of substantially streamline shape, a planing section movable at will from a retracted position in which it is housed within said fuselage…

Abstract

An aircraft comprising a fuselage of substantially streamline shape, a planing section movable at will from a retracted position in which it is housed within said fuselage to a planing position in which its forward and aft ends are spaced from and below said fuselage, a nose piece movable from a retracted position, in which it is housed within the fuselage, to an operative position and pivoted at its forward end to said fuselage and at its aft end to said planing section, the aft end of said planing section when in planing position being lower than its forward end, and said planing section comprising a centre portion of approximately V‐section as seen in front elevation, outer portions and hinges at the top of said planing section extending in a fore and aft direction and attaching said outer portions to said centre portion, longitudinally spaced struts pivoted at their opposite ends to the fuselage and to the planing section, a remotely operable jack for imparting pivotal movement to said struts to move the planing surface to and from its planing position, the forward strut serving, when acuated, also to move said nose piece to and from operative position, a torque shaft at the lower end of the rear strut, linkages for moving said outer portions about said hinges, and an operative connection between said torque shaft and said linkages for operating said linkages to spread the outer portions as the planing section descends to projected position and for folding said outer portions against said centre portion as the planing section is raised to retracted position.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of over 45000