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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Martin McShane and Karen Kirkham

Changes in demographics and disease patterns are challenging health and care systems across the world. In England, national policies have reset the direction of travel for…

Abstract

Purpose

Changes in demographics and disease patterns are challenging health and care systems across the world. In England, national policies have reset the direction of travel for the NHS. Collaboration, integration and personalisation are intended to become prime principles and drivers for new models of care. Central to this is the concept of population health management. This has emerged, internationally, as a method to improve population health. Fundamental for population health management to succeed is the use of integrated data, analytics combined with professional insight and the adoption of a learning health system culture. This agenda reaches beyond the NHS in England and the public health profession to embrace a broad range of stakeholders. By drawing on international experience and early experience of implementation in the United Kingdom, the potential for health and care systems in England to become world leading in population health management is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A viewpoint paper.

Findings

Population health management is a major change in the way health and care systems look at the challenges they are facing. It makes what is happening to individuals, across the continuum of care, the essence for insight and action. The NHS has the components for success and the potential to become world leading in delivery of population health management as part of its integrated care agenda.

Originality/value

This is the first viewpoint paper to set out how population health management contributes to the integrated care agenda in the NHS.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Cynthia J. Sieck, Thomas Wickizer and Laurel Geist

Individuals suffering from serious mental illness (SMI) face many challenges of navigating a complex and often fragmented health care system and may die significantly…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals suffering from serious mental illness (SMI) face many challenges of navigating a complex and often fragmented health care system and may die significantly earlier from co-morbid physical health conditions. Integrating mental and physical health care for individuals with SMI is an emerging trend addressing the often-neglected physical health care needs of this population to better coordinate care and improve health outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Population Health Management (PHM) provides a useful framework for designing integrated care programs for individuals with SMI.

Findings

This paper examines the structure and evolution of the integrated care program in Missouri in the context of PHM, highlighting particular elements of PHM that facilitate and support development of an integrated mental and physical health care program.

Originality/value

As health care reform provides external motivation to provide integrated care, this study can be useful as other states attempt to address this important issue.

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Meghan Hufstader Gabriel, Danielle Atkins, Xinliang Liu and Rebecca Tregerman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between ownership type and population health initiatives adopted by hospitals using the 2015 American Hospital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between ownership type and population health initiatives adopted by hospitals using the 2015 American Hospital Association data.

Design/methodology/approach

Hospitals of various sizes, ownership structures and geographic locations are represented in the survey. The outcome variables of interest include measures of hospital population health activities.

Findings

Findings indicate that nonprofit hospitals are most likely to express commitment to population health and participate in population health activities, with for-profit hospitals being least likely. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that discrepancies in population health approaches exist across ownership status – particularly, nonprofit hospitals appear to be the most likely to be involved in population health efforts.

Practical implications

As we continue to push for population health management in the hospital setting, grappling with the definition and purpose of population health management will be essential.

Social implications

Overall, these results suggest that nonprofit hospitals are more likely to be implementing population health efforts than for-profit or government-owned hospitals.

Originality/value

Although there are several studies on population health in hospitals, this study is the first to investigate the relationship between ownership type and population health initiatives adopted by hospitals.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Constance Dumalanede, Kavita Hamza and Marielle Payaud

This study aims to highlight the processes that private organisations implement to improve access to health care services for low-income communities in Brazil.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to highlight the processes that private organisations implement to improve access to health care services for low-income communities in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research based on a comparative case study was conducted in São Paulo. A for-profit organisation and a not-for-profit one were compared to scrutinise how they adapt themselves to the social context they are embedded in; while improving their service accessibility.

Findings

Both kinds of organisations have succeeded to reach their goal of improving the access and reducing the time frame of health care services to low-income populations. Their initial business model (BM) makes them face their own challenges that they face with different strategies. It affects their way of communicating, their organisational culture, the patients’ expectations and their level of inclusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The research is context-dependent because of the specific conditions of the health public system in Brazil. When shaping health care BMs, the national context must be taken into account and the service marketing components should be used to enhance patients’ value co-creation in the health care service delivery process.

Practical implications

The research gives insights to organisations that seek to adapt their BM to improve health-care access to low-income populations.

Social implications

Health-care access plays a key role in improving populations’ living conditions and reach one of the sustainable development goals of the United Nation.

Originality/value

Health care services access at the bottom of the pyramid remains under-studied. The paper brings value by comparing for-profit and non-profit organisations, which have the same social goal of improving health-care access to low-income populations while developing different practices to deal with their own challenges.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Helmut Hildebrandt, Timo Schulte and Brigitte Stunder

The purpose of this article is to share emerging evidence about the qualitative and economic benefits of integrating care, based on an innovative population‐based approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to share emerging evidence about the qualitative and economic benefits of integrating care, based on an innovative population‐based approach across a small region of Germany. The article aims to discuss the features that have similarities to the international discussion around managed care and accountable care, e.g. the use of a “gain share” model to incentivise all the main partners, and the quite unique approaches derived from a public health background. The operation of Gesundes Kinzigtal could be considered as a benchmark for the “Clinical commissioning groups” that are in development as a result of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A regional health management company in cooperation with the physicians' network in the region and two health insurance providers has reorganized the delivery of care across all sectors towards improving the health of the population. The key features of the approach are summarised in the paper. Administrative and medical data obtained from the health insurance providers and from routine management monitoring are used to evaluate the benefits of the approach compared to control groups.

Findings

The project is beginning to demonstrate that this model of integrated care can be effective, with cost benefits and savings for the partners, and improved health outcomes for the population.

Research limitations/implications

The project started in 2006, and only early results of the first three to four years are reported here because of the use of claims data of health insurers.

Originality/value

The approach is an innovative model of integration in its combination of logistical re‐engineering of care processes, IT integration, public health and prevention measures. Its evaluation through an ambitious series of studies may have long‐term relevance for the organisation and management of care services internationally.

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Richard Q. Lewis and Nav Chana

The purpose of this paper is to consider how the evolving concept of the “primary care home” (PCH) that is developing in England might be an effective vehicle for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how the evolving concept of the “primary care home” (PCH) that is developing in England might be an effective vehicle for the delivery of the goals of “population health”. The authors examine evidence from earlier initiatives to achieve similar objectives of primary care-led health system planning and care integration to understand relevant lessons for the PCH.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a descriptive review of the PCH using documentary sources and a non-systematic review of literature relating to primary care commissioning initiatives and recent initiatives to deliver general practice services on a larger scale.

Findings

The PCH is likely to bring forth relatively high engagement from general practitioners due to its neighbourhood scale, voluntary nature and its focus on professional partnership, personalisation of care and outcomes. It is important that participants have sufficient autonomy to act and that financial incentives are aligned with the goals of population health. It is also important that, unlike some earlier primary care initiatives, the PCH is given time to develop to maturity.

Originality/value

The PCH is a recent phenomenon that is developing in England and elsewhere. This paper locates the PCH within a historical context and draws conclusions from a relevant evidence base.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2005

Rachel Collins Wilson

Recent invasions, coups, civil wars, and ethnic crusades have caused many individuals and families around the world to flee their homelands for fear of their own safety…

Abstract

Recent invasions, coups, civil wars, and ethnic crusades have caused many individuals and families around the world to flee their homelands for fear of their own safety. The exodus of refugees to foreign nations causes a strain on those nations’ health care systems and resources. With the assistance of outside organizations, these countries can develop a health care management system for refugees that provides for both their immediate survival and long-term health stability, while preserving critical national resources. This chapter reviews the refugee problem and presents the short-term tactics and long-term strategies undertaken by seven very different national governments to care for the refugees that cross their borders. A model of a sound health care management system is used to incorporate the best practices of each country into a framework for approaching this multi-billion dollar issue.

Details

International Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-228-3

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2011

Robert Weech-Maldonado, Mona Al-Amin, Robyn Y. Nishimi and Fatema Salam

According to the Census, racial/ethnic minority populations are growing at such a fast rate that by 2050 more than 50% of the population will belong to a minority group…

Abstract

According to the Census, racial/ethnic minority populations are growing at such a fast rate that by 2050 more than 50% of the population will belong to a minority group (US Census, 2001). The increasing diversity of the U.S. population is one of the many changes that health care delivery organizations need to proactively address in order to better serve their community and improve their performance. In this paper, we argue that cultural competency not only is important from a societal perspective, i.e., reducing health disparities, but can also be a strategy for health care organizations to improve quality, lower cost, and attract customers. We provide detailed recommendations for health care leaders and managers to adopt in order to successfully serve a diverse patient population.

Details

Organization Development in Healthcare: Conversations on Research and Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-709-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Ye In (Jane) Hwang, Natasha Ann Ginnivan, Paul Leslie Simpson, Susan Baidawi, Adrienne Withall, Brie Williams and Tony Butler

The purpose of this commentary is to draw upon available literature and practices related to COVID-19 and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to highlight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this commentary is to draw upon available literature and practices related to COVID-19 and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to highlight key matters for better risk management and care of this population during this and future infectious disease pan/epidemics.

Design/methodology/approach

The present commentary draws on current policies, practices and literature regarding the health, needs and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to discuss risk, care and early release for this population during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

Incarcerated persons experience poorer health and accelerated age-related decline compared to those in the general community. The present situation offers the opportunity to fill knowledge and practice gaps, including policies for staff training, identification of dementia and cognitive decline, assessment of mobility issues, addressing barriers to health-seeking, possibilities of medical or compassionate release, risk assessment and release protocols and post-release needs.

Practical implications

While Australian prisons have acknowledged the vulnerability of older persons, more focused adaptation of COVID-19-related policies to consider adults as young as 45 years are needed. Appropriate ethical identification and management of cases in this population is needed, as is discussion on issues of decarceration and medical release. Re-conceptualisation of incarcerated adults as “citizens in need of care”, rather than as “offenders to be secured”, will be beneficial. Robust, local evidence is needed to assist decision-making.

Originality/value

This is a comprehensive, focused review of relevant evidence, policies and practices for a growing subpopulation of prisoners worldwide with complex needs and particular vulnerability to the COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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