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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2016

Ping-fu (Brian) Lai and Wai Lun (Patrick) Cheung

This chapter introduces demographic variables in empirical regression to help find whether demographic changes have an impact on economic growth. There is evidence from…

Abstract

This chapter introduces demographic variables in empirical regression to help find whether demographic changes have an impact on economic growth. There is evidence from estimated values in this chapter to suggest that there is no impact that demographic changes in Hong Kong is affecting the economic growth. The population growth has purely a transition impact where the fertility rate was low in early 2000 up to 2015 as the size of the dependency ratio increases. Besides testing demographic variables the government emphasises better education for all people of ages for prosperous growth but in fact has a negative response on educational investment on the growth of the economy. A well-educated country individual does not suggest a higher productivity in economy growth. An important implication is that there has been no single variable as yet that has seriously impacted the economy growth, but there will be changes in the coming years and has to be attended in result to avoid a diminishing economy.

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The Spread of Financial Sophistication through Emerging Markets Worldwide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-155-5

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Abstract

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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Muhammad Azam, Haider Nawaz Khan and Farah Khan

This study aims to test the Malthusian and Kremer theories by exploring the relationship between population and economic growth in a low middle-income economy of India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the Malthusian and Kremer theories by exploring the relationship between population and economic growth in a low middle-income economy of India.

Design/methodology/approach

The autoregressive distributed lag approach is employed based on the nature of time-series data to achieve the study objectives. In this study, regressand is economic growth measured by real GDP, and the regressors are population growth rate, investment, life expectancy and inflation rate from 1980 to 2018.

Findings

Empirical results confirm the applicability of Kremer’s theory. In this theory, population growth has a significant and positive impact on economic growth in the short and long run. Moreover, investment and life expectancy variables have a positive and significant impact on economic growth, whereas inflation rate has a negative association with economic growth. Empirical results support the population-growth-driven economic growth hypothesis, which indicates that population growth stimulates economic growth and development.

Practical implications

Empirical findings in this study provide guides for management authorities in formulating the right and relatable policies on population growth whilst promoting economic growth and social welfare.

Originality/value

Achieving a desirable level of economic growth is the prime objective of every country. The role of the population in the process of economic growth and development cannot be overlooked. Malthus' and Kremer's views are opposite. Extant literature exhibits that scant research has been carried out on this significant topic in developing countries. Therefore, empirically investigating the effect of population on the growth performance of India as a developing country is necessary and will significantly contribute to the literature.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-08-2019-0496

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Priyatosh Maitra

In a letter written on 24 January, 1865 to Schewitzer, Marx, commenting on the work of Proudhon, observed: “Take, for instance, Malthus's book on population. In its first…

Abstract

In a letter written on 24 January, 1865 to Schewitzer, Marx, commenting on the work of Proudhon, observed: “Take, for instance, Malthus's book on population. In its first edition it was nothing but a sensational pamphlet … and yet what a stimulus was produced by this libel on the human race.”

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Magnus Andersson, Peter G. Håkansson and Inge Thorsen

This chapter examines observed regional inequalities and centralization tendencies in Norway. Small, rural, municipalities experienced a favourable population development…

Abstract

This chapter examines observed regional inequalities and centralization tendencies in Norway. Small, rural, municipalities experienced a favourable population development from 1970 to the mid-1980s. After this, the percentage population growth has been strongest in the largest municipalities/cities, and this tendency has accelerated during the last 10–15 years. Data post-1970 strongly support the reasonable hypothesis that population growth is positively related to centrality. The major source of changes lies within the labour market regions, whereas the changes between the regions are modest. Jobs have not become more centralized than households over the period.

A conceptual model is developed, offering a useful taxonomy of municipalities in three dimensions: the unemployment rate, the employment growth, and housing prices. This provides a classification that contributes to clarify the changes in the urban-rural divide. The discussion demonstrates that distinguishing between different categories is important, since different explanations of centralization and regional disparities call for different menus of policy instruments.

We study the relationship between population growth, unemployment rates, and employment growth in Norwegian municipalities, to distinguish between disequilibrium and equilibrium explanations of the situation in regional labour markets. At a national level our results indicate that neoclassical adjustments dominate weakly over amenity-based mechanisms. However, results from many regions support the hypothesis that amenity-based adjustments are dominant for municipalities within a labour market region. One possible explanation is that the diversity in job opportunities is considered as an amenity. A thicker labour market is better fit to meet the demand of workers with specific qualifications.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun and Oluwaseyi Omowunmi Popogbe

Population growth has remained a key issue facing developing economies in the world. While developed countries are experiencing diminished or negative population growth

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Abstract

Purpose

Population growth has remained a key issue facing developing economies in the world. While developed countries are experiencing diminished or negative population growth, many countries in sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria are having population growth above the economic growth rate. With the deadline for the sustainable development goals approaching, attention is increasingly being focused on population growth and human capital development. Extant literature focused on population growth, human resource utilization and economic growth but this study aims to examine the effect of population growth on human resource utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data for the period 1990-2018, the study conducted unit root test and co-integration analyses to determine the stationarity and correlation in the long-run in the variables. The study used the error correction model to ascertain the speed at which shocks can be corrected in the long-run. Granger causality test was also carried out to ascertain the direction of causality among the variables.

Findings

The empirical results revealed that population growth has a negative and significant effect on human resource utilization. The study also revealed that unidirectional causality runs from employment rate to population growth rate and a unidirectional causality runs from employment growth rate to expected years of schooling. The Nigerian Government needs to not only control population growth but also focus on the quality of education.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into the relationship between population growth and human capital utilization in Nigeria focusing on the 1986-2018 period.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Abdul Rehman

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between electricity access, population growth and economic growth in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between electricity access, population growth and economic growth in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Phillips–Perron unit root test was applied to check the stationarity of the variables and an Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach to co-integration was used to investigate the causality link between the study variables. Finally, a projection method was applied to check the future trend of the variables.

Findings

The study results show the long-term connections among the variables; further, the results illustrate that the electricity access to the urban population and the urban population growth has a significant impact on the economic growth, while the electricity access to the rural population and the rural population growth has a negative impact on the economic growth in Pakistan.

Research limitations/implications

The electricity sector needs further attention from the Government of Pakistan to boost the production from different energy sources, such as oil, gas, solar, nuclear and hydropower to be able to fulfill the country’s growing demand.

Originality/value

By using the ARDL bounds testing approach to co-integration, this study addressed the literature gap regarding electricity access, population growth and economic growth in Pakistan.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Chukwuebuka Bernard Azolibe

The purpose of this study is to analyze the two-way causal nexus between macroeconomic factors such as foreign aid, industrialization, economic growth, population growth

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the two-way causal nexus between macroeconomic factors such as foreign aid, industrialization, economic growth, population growth, urbanization, control of corruption and the infrastructure development index of the top-ranking African countries from 2003 to 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts various econometric tools such as cross-sectional dependence test, panel unit root and cointegration test and Dumitrescu and Hurlin panel Granger causality test in ascertaining the relevant relationships between the variables under consideration.

Findings

The main findings of the Granger causality test result revealed a bidirectional causal relationship between foreign aid and infrastructure and between urbanization and infrastructure. The study also found unidirectional causality running from population growth to infrastructure while a zero causal relationship existed between industrialization and infrastructure, economic growth and infrastructure and lastly, between control of corruption and infrastructure. The study concludes that the major macroeconomic factors that influence infrastructure development in these selected African countries are foreign aid, population explosion and urbanization. Also, their high infrastructure development index has causal influence in only attracting more foreign aid and also promoting urban expansion.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, the study is unique as it is the first to determine the two-way causal nexus between macroeconomic factors and infrastructure development using a sample of the top ten African countries in infrastructure ranking. The findings reflect the current situation in Africa.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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