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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Md. Salauddin and Md. Ashikuzzaman

Climate change impacts people ' s life directly or indirectly in several ways and displacement is one such indirect effect. This paper aims to bring this fact to…

Abstract

Purpose

Climate change impacts people ' s life directly or indirectly in several ways and displacement is one such indirect effect. This paper aims to bring this fact to light as Bangladesh is going to face severe problems due to displacement of population predicted by researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an outcome of a thorough study of Bogi village in the southwestern coastal region of Bangladesh. Several factors like demographic condition, natural disasters, land loss and changes in land use pattern, have been taken into consideration. Methods used for data collection were questionnaire survey and focus group discussions in the study area.

Findings

The nature and extent of displacement are found by comparing the changes in occupation, location of settlement and permanent migration of family members. Population growth rate decreased in recent years as the annual growth rate for both sexes was 0.89 in between 1991 and 2001 but in recent years from 2001 to 2005 it was 0.63, which is a clear indication that the natural growth is hampered or major proportion of the population is migrating.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into the major reasons for displacement, especially loss of land and occupation caused by cyclone, storm surge and erosion. The assessment of the conditions allows the listing of measures to address the problem.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Md. Salauddin and Md. Ashikuzzaman

Climate change has several impacts on people ' s lives, directly or indirectly, and displacement is one such indirect effect. The purpose of this paper is to bring…

Abstract

Purpose

Climate change has several impacts on people ' s lives, directly or indirectly, and displacement is one such indirect effect. The purpose of this paper is to bring this fact to light, as Bangladesh is going to face severe problems due to the displacement of population predicted by researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an outcome of a thorough study of Bogi village in the southwestern coastal region of Bangladesh. Several factors such as demographic conditions, natural disasters, land loss and changes in landuse pattern, have been taken into consideration. Methods used for data collection were questionnaire survey and focus group discussions in the study area. The nature and extent of displacement are found by comparing the changes in occupation, location of settlement and permanent migration of family members.

Findings

Population growth rate decreased in recent years as the annual growth rate for both sexes was 0.89 in between 1991 and 2001 but in recent years, from 2001 to 2005, it was 0.63, which is a clear indication that the natural growth is hampered or a major proportion of the population is migrating. On the other hand, 361 hectors of land were lost throughout the last 18 years. As a result, 93 percent of people in that area were forced to move to other places for at least one time in their life. The major reason of displacement found was loss of land and occupation caused by cyclone, storm surge and erosion.

Practical implications

The study findings depict scenarios of rural urban migration due to disasters and critically found out the sectors to be addressed. The study can be a representative of the condition of almost all the remote coastal region and may work as a hammering tool to formulate strategic options to deal with the environmental issues and socio-economic situation.

Originality/value

Sophisticated but commonly used methods and techniques have been used to find out the problems associated with climate change and disasters in the coastal belt. The study has taken an initiative to identify climate change impacts at micro level on the basis of spatial and non-spatial attributes. The way this study was conducted can be a popular path to put future researches on a human-oriented track.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Adelle Thomas and Lisa Benjamin

This study aims to assess policies and mechanisms in Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states (SIDS) that address climate-induced migration and displacement

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess policies and mechanisms in Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states (SIDS) that address climate-induced migration and displacement. The migration of communities away from vulnerable regions is highly likely to be an adaptation strategy used in low-elevation SIDS, as the impacts of climate change are likely to result in significant loss and damage, threatening their very territorial existence. SIDS must ensure that residents relocate to less vulnerable locations and may need to consider international movement of residents. Ad hoc approaches to migration and displacement may result in increased vulnerability of residents, making the development and enforcement of comprehensive national policies that address these issues a necessity.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiators for SIDS as well as analysis of secondary data, including Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, are utilized to determine policies and mechanisms in place that focus on climate-induced migration and displacement.

Findings

While climate change is acknowledged as an existential threat, few SIDS have policies or mechanisms in place to guide climate-induced migration and displacement. Potential exists for migration and displacement to be included in policies that integrate disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation along with national sustainable development plans. Regional bodies are beneficial to providing guidance to SIDS in the development of nationally appropriate frameworks to address climate-induced migration and displacement.

Originality/value

Existing gaps in policies and mechanisms and challenges faced by SIDS in developing strategies to address climate-induced migration and displacement are explored. Best practices and recommendations for strategies for SIDS to address migration and displacement are provided.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2011

Paola Palacios

Purpose – The forced rural–urban migration in Colombia is a phenomenon that could be seen as the collateral damage of an armed conflict that takes place mainly in rural…

Abstract

Purpose – The forced rural–urban migration in Colombia is a phenomenon that could be seen as the collateral damage of an armed conflict that takes place mainly in rural areas. Nevertheless, there is a significant percentage of cases in which the main reason to flee is a direct threat by an armed actor. This chapter proposes a possible reason why an illegal armed group displaces population from rural to urban areas.

Design/methodology/approach – A two-stage game theoretical model is considered, in which the central government struggles over the control of a region with the insurgents. In the first stage, rebels have the choice of forcing a proportion of peasants out of the rural areas or not. In the second stage, both players choose the level of military expenditure.

Findings – It is found that, under certain circumstances, the displaced population could be used by the insurgents as a means to deter the central government from fighting. This model predicts that the larger the value rebels attached to the contested region, the higher the proportion of forced migrants. It is also consistent with the idea that if the central government can commit to warfare, then forced migration will be useless for rebels.

Originality/value – This chapter explores a new rationale for forced displacement which consists in lowering government's incentives to fight for a region, by reducing the remaining population which in turn reduces income for the government.

Details

Ethnic Conflict, Civil War and Cost of Conflict
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-131-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Jean Carmalt

This article looks at the relationship between human rights law and geography. Drawing from a meeting of the UN Human Rights Committee (HRC), the article explores how the…

Abstract

This article looks at the relationship between human rights law and geography. Drawing from a meeting of the UN Human Rights Committee (HRC), the article explores how the right to life was legally interpreted to apply to the loss of life associated with Hurricane Katrina. In particular, the article argues that the HRC’s legal interpretation of the right to life shifted as part of a discussion between the United States and nongovernmental organizations. The shift incorporated a more nuanced understanding of the spatial dimension of injustice by including preexisting inequalities and ongoing internal displacement in the analysis of human rights obligations related to the hurricane. The HRC meeting and the legal interpretations arising from that meeting therefore provide an example of Seyla Benhabib’s concept of “democratic iterations” as well as an example of how law can be “spatialized” through international legal processes.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-785-6

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Robert Stojanov, Ilan Kelman, Shawn Shen, Barbora Duží, Himani Upadhyay, Dmytro Vikhrov, G.J. Lingaraj and Arabinda Mishra

– The purpose of this paper is to show how typologies for environmentally induced population movement need to be understood in a contextualised manner in order to be useful.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how typologies for environmentally induced population movement need to be understood in a contextualised manner in order to be useful.

Design/methodology/approach

This study interrogates some academic discourses concerning environmentally induced population movement. By analysing key environmental factors said to contribute to population movement, in addition to considering time factors, this study uses the case of Tuvalu to demonstrate overlapping categories and the importance of contextualisation.

Findings

Current typologies provide a basis for considering a wide variety of motives for environmentally induced population movement, in relation to different drivers, motivations, time scales, and space scales. Yet contextualisation is required for policy and practice relevance.

Research limitations/implications

All typologies have limitations. Any typology should be taken as a possible tool to apply in a particular context, or to support decision making, rather than presenting a typology as universal or as an absolute without dispute.

Practical implications

Rather than disputes over typologies and definitions, bringing together different views without reconciling them, but recognising the merits and limitations of each, can provide a basis for assisting people making migration decisions.

Originality/value

None of the typologies currently available applies to all contexts of environmentally induced population movement – nor should any single typology necessarily achieve that. Instead, it is important to thrive on the differences and to contextualise a typology for use.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Stephanie Perkiss and Lee Moerman

The purpose of this paper is to present a forward-looking case of climate change induced displacement in the Pacific Islands as a multidimensional phenomenon with a moral…

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1196

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a forward-looking case of climate change induced displacement in the Pacific Islands as a multidimensional phenomenon with a moral dimension. Instead of seeking to provide a definitive solution to an imagined problem, the authors have identified the complexity of the situation through an exploration of the accounts of place and accountability for the consequences of displacement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores displacement from a sociological perspective. The authors use the sociology of worth (SOW) to anchor explicit and competing moral claims in an evaluation regime that considers questions of justice and the common good. The public accounts of place in the Pacific Islands provide the empirical material for a consideration of a situated crisis. While SOW is generally adopted for current crises or disputes, this study explores the pre-immigrant story and a future case of displacement. Bauman’s (1998, 2012) perspective on globalization is used to narrate the local conditions of place in a global context as reflective of a dominant social order.

Findings

Since place is a multidimensional concept and experienced according to various states of being including physical, functional, spiritual and emotion or feeling, displacement is also felt at a multidimensional level. Thus to provide an account of a lived experience and to foster a moral accountability for climate induced displacement requires a consideration of multiple accounts and compromises that need to be considered.

Research limitations/implications

As with the majority of accounting research that is concerned with the suffering of those at a distance, we too must tackle this conundrum in a meaningful way. As members of a society that is the largest per capita emitter of greenhouse gas, how do we speak for our drowning neighbors? The paper concludes with some insights from Boltanski (1999) as a way forward.

Originality/value

The paper presents a forward-looking scenario of a looming crisis from a sociological perspective. It adds to the literature on alternative accounts by using stories, media, government reports and other sources to holistically build a narrative grounded in a current and imaged social order.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Zaldy C. Collado and Noella May-i G. Orozco

This study aims to examine the experiences of urban poor relocatees in their resettlement communities, specifically those who were relocated from the Caloocan, Malabon…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the experiences of urban poor relocatees in their resettlement communities, specifically those who were relocated from the Caloocan, Malabon, Navotas, Valenzuela and Quezon City areas to the province of Bulacan, Philippines. This study hopes to convey the importance of revisiting the law on socialized housing in the Philippines.

Design/methodology/approach

This study gathered qualitative data through 2 focus group discussions among 28 participants who came from 3 resettlement sites in San Jose del Monte City, Bulacan Province, Philippines. The resettlement areas are owned and managed by the National Housing Authority of the Philippine Government.

Findings

Results show that resettlement experiences are stories of survival under impoverished conditions. Lack of housing facilities or poorly built units characterize their relocation experience aside from having no immediate access to basic utilities such as electricity and water, despite a law that supposedly secures these rights to relocatees. The expensive cost of transportation and the lack of livelihood also heavily strain the lives of the relocated population.

Originality/value

This study illustrates that involuntary displacement predicts poor living conditions upon resettlement. This study is an inquiry not only of existing conditions of socialized housing in resettlement areas but also past realities of these housing communities at the onset of the displacees’ relocation.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Yong Chen, Lulu He and Dan Zhou

Post-disaster population resettlement is a complicated process, during which the restoration of livelihood and lifestyle plays a critical role in achieving a successful…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-disaster population resettlement is a complicated process, during which the restoration of livelihood and lifestyle plays a critical role in achieving a successful resettlement outcome. This paper attempts to examine how recovery policies and relocation approaches influence people's livelihood recovery and perception of wellbeing. It specifically investigates the role of farmland in producing a livelihood and maintaining a rural lifestyle among displaced people.

Design/methodology/approach

Through face-to-face questionnaire surveys and in-depth interviews with rural residents displaced from their villages after the Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan, China, this study presents both quantitative and qualitative evidence to investigate how post-disaster policies and particularly the availability of farmland influence people's recovery and their satisfaction with the post-resettlement life.

Findings

Data suggest that availability of farmland, in spite of the size, makes big differences in post-disaster recovery because farmland provides resettled people with not only a livelihood to secure basic living but also a guarantee to maintain a rural lifestyle.

Research limitations/implications

More samples are needed for analyzing factors that significantly influence disaster-displaced farmers' recovery and wellbeing post resettlement.

Practical implications

This study can be used as an important reference for making plans for post-disaster recovery and population resettlement programs in other disaster-prone countries across the world.

Originality/value

Land-based relocation is proposed as a desirable approach to addressing challenges of livelihood restoration amongst the resettled population in rural areas of developing countries.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Omar Kachkar and Fares Djafri

This study aims to investigate the relevance of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in predicting the intentional behaviour of refugee entrepreneurs. This paper uses key…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relevance of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in predicting the intentional behaviour of refugee entrepreneurs. This paper uses key components of the theory on attitude, subjective norms and perceived control to explore the willingness of refugees to participate in microenterprise support programmes (MESP) in refugee camps.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a positivist research approach, comprising a quantitative basis of enquiry and gathered data via survey questionnaires. In total, 400 usable questionnaires were completed and used for analysis. This study uses descriptive and inferential analysis with SPSS and confirmatory factor analysis with AMOS to test three key TPB hypotheses.

Findings

The structured model revealed acceptable high goodness-of-fit indices. Also, the findings indicated that out of three hypotheses, two hypotheses (attitude and perceived control) were substantial, positive and significant. However, the relationship between subjective norms of refugees and their intention to participate in MESP was insignificant. The findings of this study indicate the low-profile refugees give to the views and opinions of the surrounding communities when it comes to determining their intentional behaviour. As such, some poignant implications may relate to microfinance and microcredit programmes targeting refugees.

Practical implications

The present study illustrates the interrelationships between the proposed variables. Also, by understanding the relationships between the selected variables, the findings would be useful for the concerned authorities to ameliorate and upgrade the well-being of refugees along with empowering their environment, which would facilitate their engagement in business and entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This study explores the relevance of TPB and its components in the context of the intentional behaviour of refugee entrepreneurs. It further illuminates the distinction of refugee behaviour towards entrepreneurship and MESP.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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