Search results

1 – 10 of 43
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Pooran Wynarczyk

This paper seeks to record an interview about Abbe Herzig's journey in mathematics education, career, research and practice. Abbe Herzig's passion and love for mathematics…

Downloads
552

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to record an interview about Abbe Herzig's journey in mathematics education, career, research and practice. Abbe Herzig's passion and love for mathematics began at her childhood. Although at some points in her life, due to personal and professional reasons explained below, she left mathematics education and teaching, she returned to the mathematics discipline, not as a mathematician but as an education scholar. As such, she was able to investigate those aspects of the disciplinary culture of mathematics that turns so many women away and to help formulate ways that the mathematics community can make the subject a more inclusive endeavor. She has developed courses and programmes to help diverse populations of young people discover the relevance of mathematics and science to their interests and realities. Herzig is in the midst of a major six‐year research programme, funded by the USA National Science Foundation, concerned with women and students of colour in the postgraduate mathematical sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on citations, discussion and interview with Abbe Herzig conducted in October 2006.

Findings

In one of her research studies, Abbe found that among mathematics faculty in one doctoral program their belief in talent moved the structure of doctoral education away from one of mentoring students to become mathematicians to one in which the faculty emphasized filtering out students not possessing the prerequisite dedication or talent. Mathematics is generally regarded as an objective field of knowledge, in which mathematicians work to discover truths about the natural world. In a more recent publication, Herzig has criticized the mathematics “pipeline” metaphor, as she believes it implies that students are passive actors in their education, reacting to “encountering a crack in the pipe”.

Originality/value

This is a unique profile of an internationally recognised scholar in the field of the diversity in mathematics. Herzig is a remarkable role model for women who wish to embark not only on mathematics education and profession, but other women too.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Pooran Wynarczyk and Chloe Renner

This paper seeks to address a key issue, yet a neglected area of local policy and research i.e. the “gender gap” in the labour market in the scientific‐based SMEs in the…

Downloads
2268

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address a key issue, yet a neglected area of local policy and research i.e. the “gender gap” in the labour market in the scientific‐based SMEs in the UK. The paper seeks to compare and contrast the employment and management structure, as well as participation in research and development (R&D) between female and male. It further aims to explore the educational background and the personal and professional barriers that prevent women from progression in scientific management and R&D related occupations.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical investigation is based on a sample of 45 female employees working in science, engineering and technology (SET)‐related positions and 48 SET‐related companies. Data were collected through the empirical survey of SMEs and semi structured “face‐to‐face” interviews with female employees.

Findings

The study concluded that there was no evidence of specific SET‐related barriers preventing career progression amongst women. The major barriers to progression were related to work‐life balance issues such as dependent children as well as non‐gender‐related issues such as insufficient resources for training, lack of opportunities for career advancement and lack of encouragement from management, which are more likely to be SME‐related issues.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that current programmes and initiatives to encourage people to enter SET occupations may eventually increase participation in that workforce but will not necessarily increase numbers of women in managerial and highly technical positions because of the continuing conflict over work‐life balance decisions such as having a family, or because of management and SME‐related issues such as insufficient resources.

Originality/value

The findings are based on original and unique databases, assembled over the past two years, funded by the ESRC Science in Society Programme and the Higher Education European Social Fund National. The “gender gap” in the labour market in scientific‐based SMEs in the UK, combing data of companies and employees, has not, empirically, been investigated before.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

Downloads
976

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

Downloads
365

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Pooran Wynarczyk

Purpose – This chapter addresses the participation of women (or lack of it) in industrial research and development (R&D), one of the key indicators of innovation.

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter addresses the participation of women (or lack of it) in industrial research and development (R&D), one of the key indicators of innovation.

Methodology/approach – The empirical investigation is based on a sample of 84 science- and technology-based small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), engaged in new product development and innovation, operating in the United Kingdom.

Findings – The results demonstrate that the participation of women in R&D employment, particularly at senior levels, in the SME sector operating in England, is extremely low, partly attributed to some specific challenges faced by science and R&D-based SMEs. As a result of under-representation in the scientific research, women are missing out on the opportunities that are offered by ‘open innovation’ activities such as university–industry collaboration, access to external networks, exchange of knowledge and ideas and working on joint innovation projects with other scientific researchers elsewhere.

Research limitations/implications – There is a need for more rigorous research at firm levels to examine the cumulative effects of factors that could be translated into policy measures in order to attract more women to industrial research.

Practical implications – Specific policy measures should also focus on addressing barriers faced by SMEs to meet the specific needs of their female R&D employees, particularly those expecting or looking after young children while undertaking scientific research in laboratories.

Social implications – There is a need to raise a greater awareness and promote the take-up of numerous specific positive action measures, networking platforms and other promotional activities amongst women working in the private sectors, particularly those working in isolation in laboratories.

Originality/value of chapter – The findings are, fundamentally, based on an original and unique database. Women in industrial R&D is relatively a new topic of policy and research and their participation in R&D team within the science and technology-based SMEs in England has not been investigated before.

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Pooran Wynarczyk and Susan Marlow

Whether like the sociologist, Herbert Marcuse, or the novelist Simone de Beauvoir, we see technology primarily as a means of human enslavement and destruction, or whether

Abstract

Whether like the sociologist, Herbert Marcuse, or the novelist Simone de Beauvoir, we see technology primarily as a means of human enslavement and destruction, or whether, like Adam Smith, we see it primarily as a liberating promethean force, we are all involved in its advance. (Freeman, 1974, p. 15)The initial idea informing this first ISBE Book Series was sparked by the proliferation of policy and research focused upon (a) the minority status held by women in scientific activities and discoveries around the world, (b) identifying and addressing some persisting personal, professional and institutional barriers that have continued to prevent women from entry and progression within the scientific fields and (c) attempting, but without much success, to find solutions to fix the leaks in the various joints of the so-called science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) pipeline in order to remedy the current situation.

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Pooran Wynarczyk and Susan Marlow

Purpose – This chapter outlines and describes a number of case studies detailing the experiences and activities of individual women scientists, innovators and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter outlines and describes a number of case studies detailing the experiences and activities of individual women scientists, innovators and entrepreneurs who have made substantial contributions to particular fields of science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) activities.

Methodology/approach – The chapter employs a qualitative case approach to offer detailed insight into the experiences of successful women entrepreneurs.

Findings: These case study reports describe the tactics, strategies and achievements of successful female innovators within the STEM sector.

Research limitations/implications – Although offering rich descriptions of the achievements of women innovators, these cases cannot be generalised. However, they do illustrate that woman have a notable and meaningful presence within the field of entrepreneurial STEM innovation.

Practical implications – These cases can act as role model illustrations to encourage other women to act as STEM innovators and entrepreneurs.

Social implications – Indicative that despite gendered ascriptions which limit women's engagement with STEM subjects they can, and do, offer a critical contribution to innovation and entrepreneurial activity within the field.

Originality/value of chapter – A relatively rare celebration of women's achievement within the STEM sector.

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Pooran Wynarczyk

Downloads
412

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

1 – 10 of 43