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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Toula Perrea, Athanasios Krystallis, Charlotte Engelgreen and Polymeros Chrysochou

The paper aims to address the issue of how customer value is created in the context of novel food products and how customer value influences product evaluation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to address the issue of how customer value is created in the context of novel food products and how customer value influences product evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a model formed by a series of causal relations among value (i.e. functional, social, hedonic, altruistic values) and cost perceptions (i.e. price, effort, evaluation costs, performance and product safety), their trade-offs (i.e. overall customer value) and product evaluation outcomes (i.e. satisfaction, trust).

Findings

Despite doubts about certain search (information), credence (safety) and experience (taste) attributes, perceptions about product quality, likeability and ethical image predominantly formulate customer value, indicating novel products’ potential to be evaluated positively by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model advances knowledge in the context of product innovation. Contrary to past research that focuses on consumer attitudes towards a manufacturing technology and individual technology-specific risks and benefits, the customer value approach refers to novel product-related consumer attitudes conceptualized as overall customer value; the latter results from product-related value-cost trade-offs, leading towards specific consumer–product evaluations.

Practical implications

The customer value approach refers to the value from the adoption of a new product that underlies a relevant set of product attributes (e.g. quality, image, sustainability, price, convenience, taste, safety, etc.) Focusing on product attributes that generate gain – loss perceptions impactful on consumer – product evaluations is highly relevant for product managers concerned with new product development.

Originality/value

The originality of this work lies in the successful contextualization and testing of an inclusive model that comprises both emotional and rational components, operational at the product level, to generate substantial insights on the widely unexplored interplay between consumer – perceived customer value and the generation of consumer – product evaluation outcomes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Johan Bruwer, Polymeros Chrysochou and Isabelle Lesschaeve

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation of product choice cues in a retail environment and the impact of consumer involvement on this utilisation. It…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation of product choice cues in a retail environment and the impact of consumer involvement on this utilisation. It further investigates the impact of product knowledge on product choice cue utilisation and its moderating role on the impact of consumer involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of wine as an exemplary product category is considered, given the importance and variability of choice cues that have been found to affect product choice. Analysis is conducted on survey data from a sample of wine consumers in Ontario, Canada. Product choice cues are grouped into extrinsic, intrinsic and marketing mix. The importance of how these cues are influenced from different dimensions of consumer involvement is illustrated.

Findings

The results show that product knowledge has a positive impact on intrinsic product cue utilisation and further moderates this relationship improving the predictability of the hypothesised model. Implications for theory and practice are also discussed.

Practical implications

From an industry viewpoint, the focus in the past has mostly been on using packaging to attract attention/create awareness, create an image of desirability, etc., but not nearly as much on the functionality aspects thereof; for example alternative smaller packaging sizes to the standard 750 ml wine bottle.

Originality/value

The study uses a multi-dimensional approach to measure the impact of enduring involvement on utilisation of product choice cues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Polymeros Chrysochou and Alexandra Festila

Do the package designs of organic products differ from those of conventional products and which package design elements are used more systematically in organic products…

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Abstract

Purpose

Do the package designs of organic products differ from those of conventional products and which package design elements are used more systematically in organic products? This paper aims to address this question by exploring the package design elements of organic products. The proposition is that in addition to package design elements that explicitly communicate and position a product as organic (i.e. organic labels and claims), other package design elements that implicitly convey an organic image are used.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a content analysis of the package designs from new product launches in four product categories (butter, cereals, fruit juice and milk) and across four markets (Austria, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland).

Findings

The results show that the package designs of organic products differ from those of conventional products based on the presence of more paper material, white and green colours and images displaying nature.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support the notion that in addition to organic labels and claims, package design elements that implicitly communicate values associated with organic products, such as environmental friendliness and sustainability are used.

Originality/value

This study is among the few to explore package design elements for organic products. Understanding how the package designs of organic products are constructed can support managerial decisions on the use of the package as a means to better communicate and position organic products.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Krisztina Rita Dörnyei, Athanasios Krystallis and Polymeros Chrysochou

This paper aims to investigate the impact of assortment size and attribute quantity on the depth and content of consumer information searches.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of assortment size and attribute quantity on the depth and content of consumer information searches.

Design/methodology/approach

For a computer-aided experiment using an information display board, participants (n = 393) were placed in a simulated shopping situation that involved choosing a product among three sets of frequently purchased, low-involvement, FMCG alternatives.

Findings

The findings show that when the assortment size increases, consumers acquire information from more products and cues but sacrifice product attributes. In particular, this sacrifice comes at the expense of secondary product attributes (e.g. nutrition information, country of origin), whereas primary product attributes (e.g. brand name, price) remain constant. Attribute quantity does not have a significant effect on information search.

Practical implications

Provided that several strategies rely on providing more information to consumers with the aim of making more deliberate and better choices, the findings suggest that they may have a limited effect in product categories in which the assortment size is wide. The authors discuss the implications for category management and public policy.

Originality/value

Information searches are measured by means of three different variables (searched cues, searched products and searched attributes), which enable a more complex exploration of the consumer information search process.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Philippos Karipidis, Polymeros Chrysochou and Ioanna Karypidou

The purpose of this study is to explore how food-exporting firms assess the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain that impact their performance as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how food-exporting firms assess the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain that impact their performance as well as how it relates to export performance indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered across 83 food firms in Greece, assessing the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain by using the best–worst scaling technique.

Findings

The most important characteristics relate to the quality of the primary material and the procurement costs and producer prices; these are considered more important by export-oriented food firms compared to non–export-oriented food firms. Characteristics that relate to the relationship between members of the agri-food supply chain and the interorganizational business systems and governance mechanisms are also considered of average importance. Characteristics related to the adoption of differentiation strategies are considered least important.

Practical implications

Producers should emphasize the quality and prices of their product as well as establish collaborations with food firms. Food firms need to emphasize interorganizational business systems and governance mechanisms that reduce procurement costs, instead of trying to reduce producer prices. Public authorities should engage stakeholders of the agri-food supply chain in relationships that will enable food firms to deliver on their quality and price demands.

Originality/value

Primary production and collaborations of it with food firms have not been studied in regards to what extent they relate to food firms' export performance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Polymeros Chrysochou, Armando Maria Corsi and Athanasios Krystallis

Cask wine (bag‐in‐box, soft pack) has not received considerable attention in wine marketing research, but interest among winemakers and consumers has been increasing…

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Abstract

Purpose

Cask wine (bag‐in‐box, soft pack) has not received considerable attention in wine marketing research, but interest among winemakers and consumers has been increasing steadily. However, little is known about what drives consumer preferences for cask wine and, furthermore, what the profile of the cask wine consumer is. This study aims at filling this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a web‐based survey, the best‐worst scaling (BWS) method was applied to measure the importance of attributes that Greek consumers assign when choosing cask wine. Then, a latent class clustering analysis based on the importance ratings of the attributes was applied in order to segment the Greek cask wine market.

Findings

The most important attributes were found to be price, quality and convenience packaging, whereas brand, grape variety and origin were found to be the least important ones. In relation to structure, the Greek cask wine market was found to consist of four distinct segments that were labelled as connoisseurs, convenience seekers, experienced and risk averse. These segments showed differences in relation to their past experience and in the importance given to intrinsic (quality, taste, origin) as opposed to extrinsic cues (brand, price, convenience packaging).

Research limitations/implications

Two main strategic directions are suggested to Greek cask wine producers: they can either maintain the current approach to the market by providing a “simple”, not particularly refined wine, or adopt a sustainable eco‐friendly positioning.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of what drives consumers' preferences for cask wine, something that few studies have done until now. Moreover, this is the first study to use the BWS method for this type of product.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Polymeros Chrysochou, Athanasios Krystallis, Ana Mocanu and Rachel Leigh Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to explore differences in wine preferences between Generation Y and older cohorts in the USA.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore differences in wine preferences between Generation Y and older cohorts in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 260 US consumers participated in a web‐based survey that took place in April 2010. The best‐worst scaling method was applied measuring the level of importance given by participants to a list of most common attributes used in choice of wine. Independent sample t‐tests were applied to compare the best‐worst scores between Generation Y and older cohorts.

Findings

Differences were found in the level of importance that Generation Y gives to wine attributes in comparison to older cohorts. Generation Y was found to attach more importance to attributes such as “Someone recommended it”, “Attractive front label” and “Promotional display in‐store”, whereas older cohorts gave more importance to attributes such as “I read about it” and “Grape variety”. This suggests that Generation Y preferences for wine are driven by marketing added‐value activities such as promotions and labelling, whereas limited importance is given to information about wine, reflecting lack of subjective knowledge, experience and involvement about wine.

Research limitations/implications

This research adds to generation‐based research in wine marketing and contributes towards a better understanding of the differences between generation cohorts in relation to their preferences towards wines.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to compare wine preferences of Generation Y with older cohorts using the best‐worst scaling method.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Athanasios Krystallis and Polymeros Chrysochou

This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the market structure of Greek red and white wine varieties and to measure the loyalty behaviour of frequent wine…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the market structure of Greek red and white wine varieties and to measure the loyalty behaviour of frequent wine buyers in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

The study measures brand performance and loyalty of four different Greek wine varieties. Based on stated preference data, basic brand performance measures are estimated through Juster purchase probabilities of brand choice. To measure loyalty behaviour, the polarisation index φ (phi) is used as a measure to model both loyalty to the brand name and specific wine attributes and their levels.

Findings

The findings of the present study point to the conclusion that each one of the four Greek wine varieties under examination exhibits its own market structure and loyalty profile, whereas price, quality certification and winemaker's size seem to function as loyalty stimulators more effectively for white wines. Moreover, it is also clear that the (Greek) origin or type of the wine variety per se does not constitute a particularly important loyalty component in the marketing mix of the Greek red and white wines examined here.

Research limitations/implications

Wine has always been one of the most challenging product categories to investigate. Many product‐related attributes contribute to building loyalty; this attribute‐based loyalty is often hard to delineate and take into account. Moreover, the present methodology is based on stated preference data, whereas revealed preference data could be the ideal for applying the specific methodology.

Originality/value

Few studies, if any, have used the present methodological approach to explore the issue of loyalty in the case of wine.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sladjana Nørskov, Polymeros Chrysochou and Marina Milenkova

This paper aims to examine the impact of product innovation attributes (complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, trialability and observability) on brand equity, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of product innovation attributes (complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, trialability and observability) on brand equity, and whether these attributes exert a different effect on low- versus high-equity brands. The moderating role of consumer innovativeness in this relationship is investigated further.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data from users of two brands of digital audio players of different brand equity levels.

Findings

Overall, it was found that innovation attributes have an effect on brand equity, and this effect differs between low- and high-equity brands, with a low-equity brand being benefited more than a high-equity brand from perceptions towards a product’s innovation attributes. Additionally, it was found that the impact of complexity and relative advantage on brand equity increases when consumer innovativeness increases in the case of a high-equity brand. However, no significant difference was found between low- and high-equity brands regarding the proposed moderating effect of innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

The study only examines two brands belonging to one particular industry, which limits the findings’ generalizability. Thus, the use of more test brands from different industries should be the goal for future research.

Practical implications

Managers should consider the firm’s current brand equity level and its competitive position to maximize the effect of product innovation attributes.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the research on the relationship between product innovation and brand equity and provides theoretical and managerial implications in the field of innovation and brand management.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Francisco Guzman and Cleopatra Veloutsou

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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