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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

İsmail Mücahit Alptekin, Ece Erdoğan, Aylin İşler, Esma Cansu Yanalak, Funda Pınar Çakiroğlu and Sevgi Aras

Previous studies have reported that dietary fibers such as polydextrose and maltodextrin can reduce food intake; however, the studies on the differences of this effect are…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have reported that dietary fibers such as polydextrose and maltodextrin can reduce food intake; however, the studies on the differences of this effect are insufficient. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of dietary fibers maltodextrin and polydextrose on alterations of short-term satiety, energy intake and postprandial blood glucose in healthy females.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was designed as a randomized, crossover and double blind research. For this purpose, 21 healthy females consumed a milkshake containing 0 g (control), 15 g polydextrose (PDX) and 15 g maltodextrin (MDX), and an ad libitum lunch meal was served 150 min later. Subjective appetite scores (hunger, satiety, prospective food consumption and desire to eat) were measured using a visual analog scale. Appetite scores and blood glucose were measured before preload and once per 15 min after milkshake consumption.

Findings

Visual analog scale scores showed that PDX had an improved effect on satiety and hunger feelings. Compared to the control, dietary fiber increased the Area Under Curve (AUC) scores of satiety (p < 0.001) and decreased the AUC scores of hunger (p < 0.001), prospective food consumption (p < 0.001) and desire to eat (p < 0.001). Energy intake during ad libitum meal was significantly lower in PDX (Control: 862 (54.3) Kcal versus PDX: 679 (35.4) Kcal and MDX: 780 (49.3) Kcal. Moreover, the blood glucose levels were significantly lower in MDX.

Originality/value

This study conducted with healthy females demonstrated that PDX was more effective in inducing satiety during subsequent food intake, and that postprandial blood glucose were within more healthy levels in MDX.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Driene Gomes Gonzaga, Rafaela Corrêa Pereira, Andressa Alvarenga Silva, Soraia Vilela Borges, João de Deus Souza Carneiro, Raimundo Vicente de Sousa and Michel Cardoso de Angelis-Pereira

The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam, containing marolo, sweet passion fruit and soursop, enriched with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam, containing marolo, sweet passion fruit and soursop, enriched with polydextrose and fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and evaluate in vivo the effect of consumption of this product.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 48 male rats were divided into six groups and fed a AIN-93M rodent diet supplemented with 10% jam enriched with different proportions of FOS and polydextrose. The effects on glycemic response, mineral utilization and fecal and histological characteristics were evaluated.

Findings

The addition of the jams enriched with the fibers in different levels based on current legislation, in the diet of the rats, for 30 days, did not affect significantly (p = 0.05) parameters such as daily mean consumption (DMC) and daily weight gain (DWG), fecal weight, mineral absorption, glycemic responses and glycemic index of the diets and histological parameters. Moisture and ether extract contents of the stool, however, were positively affect by these ingredients. These parameters were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in groups treated with FOS and polydextrose.

Originality/value

The sugar-free Brazilian mixed fruit jam besides to increase availability and add value to exotic Brazilian fruits could be an alimentary source of interest. However, more specific studies, aimed at questioning and confirming the optimal doses of prebiotics to normal and dysglycemic individuals and with longer duration, are needed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Julia Fernanda Urbano Marinho, Marcella Chalella Mazzocato, Fabricio Luiz Tulini, Marluci Palazzolli Silva, Elaine Cristina Pereira de Martinis and Carmen Sílvia Fávaro-Trindade

The purpose of this study was the development and the nutritional, physical-chemical and sensorial characterization of probiotic and synbiotic sorbets elaborated with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was the development and the nutritional, physical-chemical and sensorial characterization of probiotic and synbiotic sorbets elaborated with jussara pulp (Euterpe edulis), Lactobacillus spp. and polydextrose.

Design/methodology/approach

Five formulations of jussara sorbets (one control, two probiotics and two synbiotics) were produced and evaluated according to their centesimal composition, pH, soluble solids, instrumental color, overrun, apparent density, sensory acceptability and purchase intent.

Findings

All sorbets exhibited low calorific value, with no difference between them (p =0.96). The synbiotic samples (S3 and S5) showed the higher carbohydrate (30.4 and 30.2 per cent) and crude fiber content (0.4 and 0.5 per cent). Regarding to sensory acceptance, the probiotic samples (S2 and S4) presented greater global acceptability (averages acceptance 6.4 and 6.6, respectively) while the polydextrose samples (S3 and S5) showed low values (5.9 for both samples), although this prebiotic was able to increase the overrun to values above 40 per cent.

Practical implications

The functional jussara sorbets are a promising possibility for diversification of the probiotic foods already offered. The combination of its probiotic, prebiotic and bioactive properties can provide technological improvement and superior nutritional quality, with good sensorial acceptance. Likewise, jussara pulp showed nutritional properties favorable to its application in the food industry, which can help preserve its endangered palm tree.

Originality/value

The probiotics and synbiotics jussara sorbets showed to be adequate as a lactose-free and low-calorie functional product, with high nutritional, commercial and ecological value. Also, it was possible to notice that while the addition of probiotics improved the sensorial acceptance of jussara sorbets, polydextrose raised the technological quality by increasing its overrun.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Taísa Rezende Teixeira Farias, Maria Cecília Evangelista Vasconcelos Schiassi, Patrícia Aparecida Pimenta Pereira, Vanessa Rios de Souza, Amanda Maria Teixeira Lago, Soraia Vilela Borges and Fabiana Queiroz

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the bodying agents (erythritol, sorbitol, xylitol and polydextrose) and their mixtures on the preparation of mixed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the bodying agents (erythritol, sorbitol, xylitol and polydextrose) and their mixtures on the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves (marolo, soursop and sweet passion fruit).

Design/methodology/approach

The simplex mixture design was used for product optimization and the preserves evaluated by physical, physicochemical and sensory properties. The research data were analyzed using regression equations on SAS University and exploratory analysis by principal component analysis and parallel factors techniques on Sensomaker software.

Findings

The results show that erythritol and polydextrose bodying agents should not be used as pure components because they provoked changes in the properties of the final product and negatively influenced the sensory attributes. While the high concentrations of xylitol and sorbitol provided better sensorial acceptance, being considered, therefore, good substitutes for sucrose.

Practical implications

This research has shown it is feasible to use bodying agents in the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves without added sugar.

Social implications

The development of mixed preserves could increase population access to the Brazilian Cerrado fruits. In addition, sugar-free preserves are a viable alternative for adding value to the product and satisfy all the consumers.

Originality/value

The combination of properties of two or more fruits and use of bodying agents can improve sensory, physical and physicochemical characteristics of the final product. However, there are technological challenges to evaluate in the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves without added sugar.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Pre‐employment medical examinations with appropriate testing are required in many industries—a basic tenet of Occupational Medicine—and it has long been a recommendation…

Abstract

Pre‐employment medical examinations with appropriate testing are required in many industries—a basic tenet of Occupational Medicine—and it has long been a recommendation of many in community medicine and environmental health for those food handlers whose close contact with open food, aspects of its preparation, processing, sale, exposure for sale, make their personal health important and in prevention of diseases and may constitute a health hazard to food consumers. Epidemiological studies have revealed too many instances of a human source of disease, especially in milk and water, for this to be denied or under‐estimated. Food poisioning outbreaks caused by a carrier, of chronic or limited duration, enable those investigating such outbreaks to see there could be advantages in medical screening of certain employees especially in certain areas of food trades. The main problem is to decide the extent of the discipline and who should be subject to it. The fact that by far the majority of the examinations and tests will prove negative should not be seen as removing the need for the service. After all, there are a number of similar circumstances in public health. Meat inspection, for example, in which a 100% inspection of all food animals slaughtered for human food is now fully established, it is not suggested that inspections should in any way be reduced despite the fact that a number of the diseases, eg., tuberculosis, no longer occurs as it once did, which was the prime cause of meat inspection being brought into being. Other areas where routine medical examinations reveal satisfactory health with only a few isolated cases requiring attention, is the school medical service. Here, the “de‐bunkers” have had some success, but if children are not regularly examined at vulnerable age levels and especially in between where the occasion demands, there is no question that much will be missed and ill‐health progress to a chronic state.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Silvia Marina González-Herrera, Raul Rodriguez Herrera, Mercedes Guadalupe López, Olga Miriam Rutiaga, Cristobal Noe Aguilar, Juan Carlos Contreras Esquivel and Luz Araceli Ochoa Martínez

The purpose of this paper is to explore the variety of food in which it has been applied as a prebiotic and functional ingredient, the concentrations used there in, the…

1264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the variety of food in which it has been applied as a prebiotic and functional ingredient, the concentrations used there in, the tests that have been conducted on these fortified foods and briefly reviews the history and characteristics of inulin.

Design/methodology/approach

The review included articles from 1999-2013. The papers which reported inulin concentrations used, the purpose of the application and tests on final product, were mainly selected. Articles were collected in electronic databases such as Elsevier-Science Direct, Emerald, Springer Link, Wiley and Redalyc.

Findings

The interaction inulin-food with different food matrices is complex, and is not always technologically favorable for the product. Moreover, additional to evaluations of sensory, physicochemical and rheological characteristics, it is essential to carry out measurements in the food, of such characteristics as prebiotic content, and prebiotic activity in vivo and in vitro, and assess potential adverse reactions in order to define suitable doses of consumption.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of conducting in vitro and in vivo testing of potential prebiotic inulin-supplemented food in order to define dose that benefit health and do not cause unacceptable gastrointestinal distress.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Alfred Hagen Meyer and Stephen Mark Jewell

Under the principle of mutual recognition any product from a Communitymember state that is legally produced and sold can be marketed in anyother member state. This…

531

Abstract

Under the principle of mutual recognition any product from a Community member state that is legally produced and sold can be marketed in any other member state. This principle was developed by the European Court in the Cassis jurisdiction. The German legislature has taken this principle into account in implementation of the new paragraph 47(a) in the Lebensmittel – und Bedarfsegenstandegesetz (German Food Law). Gives an overview of the judicial developments which preceded the passing of this new section.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Chris Strugnell

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines thefunctions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fatsubstitutes. Summarizes the…

Abstract

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines the functions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fat substitutes. Summarizes the implications for consumers and processors of their use.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

S. Sarkar

The purpose of this article is to attempt to highlight various approaches for enhancing the viability of probiotics, with special emphasis on micro‐encapsulation.

2230

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to attempt to highlight various approaches for enhancing the viability of probiotics, with special emphasis on micro‐encapsulation.

Design/methodology/approach

Various techniques, such as selection of acid and bile resistant strains, use of oxygen impermeable packaging materials, two‐step fermentation, stress adaptation, inclusion of micro‐nutrient, sonication of bacteria and micro‐encapsulation, which could be employed for maintaining or enhancing probiotic viability are discussed, with special emphasis on micro‐encapsulation.

Findings

Probiotics lose their viability during gastro‐intestinal transit due to unfavorable intestinal environment. Amongst diverse techniques micro‐encapsulation could confer protection to the probiotics both in the product as well as in the gastro‐intestinal environment.

Originality/value

The paper shows that micro‐encapsulation of probiotics renders them stable both in the product as well as in the intestinal environment and application of encapsulated probiotics would result in a product with greater prophylactic activities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Meena Goswami, B.D. Sharma, S.K. Mendiratta, U.B. Chaudhary, Vikas Pathak and Nitin Tyagi

The purpose of this paper is to develop and to assess quality characteristics of functional carabeef cookies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and to assess quality characteristics of functional carabeef cookies.

Design/methodology/approach

Carabeef cookies were prepared with incorporation of 50 percent carabeef powder in a pre-standardized formulation and then were baked at 150-160°C for 35-40 minutes. Developed functional carabeef cookies were incorporated with 50 percent carabeef powder, 10 percent orange pulp fiber as natural fiber source, 1.5 percent guar gum as fat replacer and 20 percent of sodium caseinate as sugar replacer. Cookies were analyzed for various physical properties, proximate parameters physcio-chemical properties, instrumental textural properties, color values, sensory evaluation and complete profile estimation in terms of minerals and fatty acids analysis.

Findings

Functional carabeef cookies had 4.48 times higher protein, 6.13 times higher IDF, 5.47 times higher SDF and 4.47 times higher TDF as compared to normal refined wheat flour (RWF) cookies. Functional carabeef cookies had 34.58 percent lower fat, 19.95 percent less cholesterol and 12.5 percent lower energy content as compared to normal RWF cookies.

Social implications

Functional carabeef cookies had comparatively higher mineral content as well as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in a desirable ratio. Health-promoting functional carabeef cookies might be a magnificent option to overcome the problem of malnutrition, quite prevalent among lower socio-economical strata people specifically children and women.

Originality/value

Health-promoting functional carabeef cookies had higher nutritional content and acceptability, and thus could be commercialized to improve socio-economic status and health of consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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