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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Iryna Andras

The aim of the study is to determine the key development stages of small entrepreneurship in Belarus depending on the impact of reformative activity of authorities on…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to determine the key development stages of small entrepreneurship in Belarus depending on the impact of reformative activity of authorities on socio-innovative activity of entrepreneurs. Also we seek to determine the projective behavioral strategies of entrepreneurs in the context of contradictory socio-economic processes in Belarus.

Design/methodology/approach

Historico-sociological approach to the development of small entrepreneurship in Belarus is based on the analysis of books, articles, official documents and official statistics available mostly in the Russian and Belarusian languages. Expert survey is used as the most effective method of survey to predict further development of small entrepreneurship. Within the framework of the activity-structure concept, (T. Zaslavskaya) combination of both approaches allows presenting quantitative and qualitative changes in business structures in order to coordinate socio-economic progress.

Findings

In Belarusian transition economy the reformative activity of the authorities is absolutely dependent on politico-administrative influence. That is why the behavioral strategies of entrepreneurs are formed as reaction-adaptive behavior under mounting pressure of state policy.

Research limitations/implications

The results are primarily applicable for post-Soviet republics and countries with transition economy.

Practical implications

This paper implies that in post-Soviet economies like Belarus socio-economic integration of entrepreneurs is overly dependent on politico-administrative activity of the authorities.

Originality/value

This study includes two approaches: historico-sociological and expert survey as a forecasting method. This sociological approach gives the opportunity to characterise the continuity in behavioral strategies of entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Sebastian Godenhjelm, Rolf A. Lundin and Stefan Sjöblom

The purpose of this paper is to establish an understanding of what projectification means, how projectification is driven forward, as well as what the consequences of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish an understanding of what projectification means, how projectification is driven forward, as well as what the consequences of projectification are in an European Union (EU) context, and in the public sector in general.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methods consist of a literature review as well as a meta-analysis of key EU policy documents related to the functioning of regional development and projects. The paper shows that structural developments brought forth by a projectification in a public sector context have significant consequences.

Findings

Without contextually sensitive interlinking mechanisms between temporary and permanent structures projects risk losing their flexible and innovative qualities, and may fragment the ability of permanent organisations for maintaining coordination and continuity. The findings suggests that the proximity of permanent organisations, the discretion of entrepreneurship, the political priority of the task, the inclusion of competencies and interests, and the quality of transfer mechanisms are essential variables in explaining the outcome of temporary organisations in a politico-administrative context.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the literature on projects in a public sector context and suggests that comparative research on the drivers and consequences of public sector projectification in supranational as well as national contexts is needed.

Practical implications

The increasing requirements for applied project management skills and methods as criteria for project selection in the public sector highlight the importance of a broader theoretical and practical understanding of projectification.

Originality/value

The paper adds a new dimension to the projectification debate by presenting a descriptive and conceptual discussion about the consequences of public sector projectification in an EU context. It complements an existing theory of the temporary organisation and takes the first steps towards a theory applicable to projectification in a public context.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2007

Eva Beuselinck, Koen Verhoest and Geert Bouckaert

A well-coordinated public sector is often considered to be of major importance, but at the same time it appears to be a huge challenge. Public sector reforms struggling…

Abstract

A well-coordinated public sector is often considered to be of major importance, but at the same time it appears to be a huge challenge. Public sector reforms struggling with the coordination conundrum are numerous and countries display a certain dynamic in their adoption of coordination instruments throughout time. On the one hand, it is sensible to presume that – to a certain extent – countries are stimulated to adopt similar coordination instruments, because of isomorphic processes induced by factors such as the spread of the new public management line of thought or the multiplication of exchanges of good practices at an international level. On the other hand, culture-linked elements might have an important role to play in explaining idiosyncrasies. By examining the conceptual link between coordination and culture through an empirical analysis for four counties (UK, New Zealand, France, and Sweden), it is the aim of this chapter to explore the relevance of culture for understanding coordination trajectories of individual countries.

Details

Cultural Aspects of Public Management Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1400-3

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Edoardo Ongaro and Giovanni Valotti

The aim of this paper is to outline the sets of factors influential on the implementation of public management reform in the politico‐administrative context of Italy.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to outline the sets of factors influential on the implementation of public management reform in the politico‐administrative context of Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a combination of different research designs, multiple case studies on regional governments.

Findings

Some broad sets of factors affecting implementation of public management reform have been identified They include: characteristics of the administrative tradition and features of the politico‐administrative context; the design of the reform package and the coalition of interests sustaining the reform; behavioural triggers; and the building over the time of management capacity at the level of individual public sector organisations.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations include the availability of empirical evidence given the width of the phenomenon under investigation, as well as the broader caveats that apply to researching vast and complex problems like those concerning management reforms at nation‐wide level. Some implications for the development of a broader comparative research agenda on countries in the Napoleonic administrative tradition are proposed.

Originality/value

Provides an interpretation of the dynamics of the process of implementation of public management reforms in Italy by combining a plurality of theoretical sources.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Ekaterina Turkina and Mai Thi Thanh Thai

This study is devoted to the empirical assessment of the macro‐level impact of social capital on immigrant entrepreneurship (the general levels of immigrant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is devoted to the empirical assessment of the macro‐level impact of social capital on immigrant entrepreneurship (the general levels of immigrant entrepreneurship, as well as high‐value added immigrant entrepreneurship).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies multiple regression analysis to the data on immigrant entrepreneurship and high‐value added immigrant entrepreneurship provided by OECD. The measures of the independent variables (the components of social capital) are based on World Value Survey.

Findings

The results reveal that social capital does play a significant role in high‐value added immigrant entrepreneurship in particular and immigrant entrepreneurship in general. With strong statistical significance, three social capital factors – networking, interpersonal trust, and institutional trust – provide an explanation for variations in immigrant entrepreneurship across countries.

Originality/value

Although the literature has long pointed out the importance of social capital as a determinant of economic activity, entrepreneurship researchers have focused much attention on the impact of personal, economic, and politico‐administrative factors while leaving social capital factors largely unexamined. Thus, study offers a systematic analysis of the effects of social capital on immigrant entrepreneurship and high‐value added immigrant entrepreneurship at a macro level and discusses policy‐making implications.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2016

Stefan Sjöblom and Kjell Andersson

Departing from an ideal interpretation of the collaborative governance approach, the authors analyse the integrative and collaborative capacities of project-based regional…

Abstract

Departing from an ideal interpretation of the collaborative governance approach, the authors analyse the integrative and collaborative capacities of project-based regional development actions in spatially diverse city regions in Finland. Scrutinizing the relevance of collaborative ideals and their institutional prerequisites becomes all the more salient given the strong emphasis on collaborative approaches to regional diversities throughout Europe. The results show that the integrative potentials are related to specific types of areas. They also call the facilitating capacities of politico-administrative institutions into question. The results are interpreted in terms of an institutional duality that strongly corresponds to the public-private divide.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Thurid Hustedt and Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen

Neutrality has traditionally been considered a key trait of the civil service in Western democracies. The conception of the neutral bureaucracy is closely linked to the…

Abstract

Neutrality has traditionally been considered a key trait of the civil service in Western democracies. The conception of the neutral bureaucracy is closely linked to the notion of the prominent politics–administration dichotomy of the two spheres of politics and administration, as advocated by Max Weber (1980) and Woodrow Wilson (1887). According to conventional wisdom, the firm and encompassing implementation of the merit principle realises the idea of a neutral bureaucracy. In that respect, neutrality and merit-based recruitments are often considered the opposite of politicisation. Conventionally, a neutral bureaucracy is considered to assure competence and immunity against opportunistic ideas brought in by volatile, sometimes erratic political leadership. Because elected politicians come and go with elections, they cannot ensure that political decisions are carried out based on the ‘best’ available knowledge. In that sense, bureaucrats are conceived as neutral, obedient servants that subordinate their behaviour to the will of political masters, to the law and the common good. However, there is no strict politics–administration dichotomy in contemporary politico-administrative systems. Empirical findings from the late 1970s onwards demonstrated that bureaucrats are by no means as neutral and ‘apolitical’ as assumed, but rather remarkably involved in political processes. This chapter discusses the literature on neutral competence and presents an empirical analysis of Danish and British civil servants’ accounts of neutrality. This chapter concludes by suggesting the concept of competent neutrality and discussing implications for our understanding of bureaucratic neutrality.

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Isabel Corte‐Real

The purpose of the paper is to address the question of the influence of the administrative tradition and the politico‐administrative context on the formulation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to address the question of the influence of the administrative tradition and the politico‐administrative context on the formulation and implementation of public management reform in Portugal.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on empirical evidence collected from various sources. It reflects the personal experience of the author, who was personally involved in the reform process, and is also the result of a wide‐ranging review of literature on public administration and public management reform in Portugal and other European countries.

Findings

The paper identifies different phases of reform, and acknowledges the existence of a recurrent problem with public expenditure and increasing public employment. It concludes that there has been no lack of great reforms, and suggests a different approach – one that does not require special speeches or special doctrine, but is based on discreet work by politicians and managers seeking to fulfil the traditional values of the public service.

Research limitations/implications

Mainly due to a lack of both studies and evaluation practices – make it difficult to assess the actual impact of the different waves of reforms. However, administration has managed to cope with the process of change while maintaining a key orientation towards the citizen and society.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is that it is the first time the whole cycle of reforms, from 1974 until 2007, has been covered and also related to the politico‐administrative tradition. It contains summarised but complete information and suggests a new approach based on the ethical values of the public service.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2007

Martin Koci

The chapter summarizes evidence from Switzerland to suggest that culture proves to be a useful hypothesis to explain variations in public management reforms (PMR) in…

Abstract

The chapter summarizes evidence from Switzerland to suggest that culture proves to be a useful hypothesis to explain variations in public management reforms (PMR) in different arrangements. Culture, which is among other things embedded in politics, society, and public administration seems to have a strong impact on reform initiation, impact, and outcome as well. The review shows that an optimal culture fit between traditional and desired values appears promising. The chapter concludes that public sector reforms should consider cultural, historical, and geopolitical factors additionally when trying to conceptualize PMR in different settings.

Details

Cultural Aspects of Public Management Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1400-3

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Carlos Seiglie, Steven Coissard and Yann Échinard

We must have information superiority: the capability to collect process and disseminate an uninterrupted flow of information while exploiting or denying an adversary's

Abstract

We must have information superiority: the capability to collect process and disseminate an uninterrupted flow of information while exploiting or denying an adversary's ability to do the same” (DoD, Joint Vision 2010). Since the end of the 1980s, the world economy has evolved, and there has been a rapid movement towards globalization. The end of the Cold War coincided with the end of “traditional” conflicts and a new dominant paradigm appeared. The terms of economic war and international competitiveness became inescapable issues dealt at the same moment by economists and the whole politico-administrative sphere. However, as Krugman (1996) noted this vision can turn out dangerous if it leans on erroneous diagnoses. Economic intelligence appears in this particular context. From a theoretical point of view, economic intelligence is presented in Michael Porter's works, for example in his article with V. E. Millar, “How information gives you competitive advantage”. Empirically, economic intelligence is not a new phenomenon. For example, it was practiced in the Middle Ages, when the Venetians passed information onto the Palace of the Doges through their ports and Mediterranean fleet during competition between the commercial cities of the North of Italy and Flanders.

Details

War, Peace and Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-535-2

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