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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2007

Mark Bevir and Ben Krupicka

Abstract

Details

Police Occupational Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-055-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Trent Eric Ikerd

The process of institutionalizing police reform has been relatively ignored in the policing literature. Owing to this, there is no established framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

The process of institutionalizing police reform has been relatively ignored in the policing literature. Owing to this, there is no established framework for institutionalizing police reform. This article seeks to add to the knowledge regarding the institutionalization of police reform by presenting the results from a study that examined the institutionalization of problem‐oriented policing (POP) in the CMPD.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was guided by the limited amount of organizational change in policing research and the limited amount of organizational development literature pertaining to institutionalization. The research utilized captain interviews and rank‐and‐file surveys to determine officer knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes towards POP in the CMPD. The CMPD's policies, procedures, and practices pertaining to POP were also outlined.

Findings

It was found that POP has become institutionalized in the CMPD. POP principles are evident in the captain's culture, rank‐and‐file's culture, and the policy and procedure of the CMPD.

Practical implications

The study puts forth a framework for assessing and institutionalizing police reform that other departments can test and utilize in their efforts to institutionalize police reform.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to examine the institutionalization process of police reform. A framework is put forth to assess and aid in other police departments' efforts to institutionalize police reforms.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Garth den Heyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of new public management (NPM) as a major strategy for democratic police reform in transitioning, developing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of new public management (NPM) as a major strategy for democratic police reform in transitioning, developing and post‐conflict nations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature and history of the use of NPM in the public sector and policing in Western nations and considers its use in programs of police reform.

Findings

The review identifies that NPM can be used as a strategy in police reform and is able to be used in conjunction with policing approaches such as community‐oriented policing. However, the adoption of NPM must be culturally specific and implemented within local capability constraints.

Practical implications

Police reform, transparency and accountability are an important concern for all post‐conflict and transitioning police agencies; therefore, the findings of this research are useful for implementation or planning of police reform and restructuring programs.

Originality/value

With its focus on police management accountability in post‐conflict or transitioning nations, this article expands research on strategies of democratic police reform and capacity development.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Harry Barton

Over the past two decades successive British governments, both Conservative and Labour, have attempted to implement reforms within the English and Welsh police service…

Abstract

Over the past two decades successive British governments, both Conservative and Labour, have attempted to implement reforms within the English and Welsh police service. The latest Labour government proposals have resulted in new legislation which paves the way for wide‐scale reforms of how the police are managed, financed and judged against specific performance targets. Further, the introduction of the UKs first “national policing plan” has led to the belief that this is a sign of the British government's intention to reduce/remove the historical, political neutrality identified through “constabulary independence”. Past experiences suggest that greater “nationalisation” of policing in the UK is unlikely to meet government expectations owing to the strength of police (sub) culture to adopt and yet resist reform and that the governments failure to pay attention to this may result in the failure of reform.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Frank Leishman, Stephen Cope and Peter Starie

Since the late 1970s the public sector in Britain has been subjectto major reforms, which have been consistent with the prominentinternational trend of bringing new public…

Abstract

Since the late 1970s the public sector in Britain has been subject to major reforms, which have been consistent with the prominent international trend of bringing new public management into government. The police service has escaped significant reform, particularly when compared with other policy areas. But in 1993 the Conservative government put forward a series of police reform measures, corresponding largely to the tenets of new public management. However, despite political commitment to reform, the implementation of many of the reform proposals has been successfully resisted by the police. Provides an explanation of the attempt to reform the police service by using a policy networks approach.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Bruce Kwong

– The purpose of this paper is to study the institutional reform of policing in Macao.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the institutional reform of policing in Macao.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes both comparative analysis and interviews.

Findings

Macao's policing remains a case study demonstrating incomplete reforms, organizational fragmentations, and retains the legacy of colonialism.

Originality value

This is an original study of Macao's police forces.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Gregory D. Russell

Recent events of police misconduct and corruption produced widespread calls for law enforcement reform. Reformers apply one of four models, each of which predicts…

Abstract

Recent events of police misconduct and corruption produced widespread calls for law enforcement reform. Reformers apply one of four models, each of which predicts successful reform, exclusive of other models. Each model requires substantial theoretical elaboration in order to permit rigorous testing of model effectiveness. Offers model elaboration and predicts that the models will be more effective to the extent that they operate interactively.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Barry Loveday, Steve Williams and Peter Scott

The aim of this paper is to examine the significance and the implications of efforts to institute workforce modernization within the police service in England and Wales.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the significance and the implications of efforts to institute workforce modernization within the police service in England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken uses an analysis of the modernization proposals advanced by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary as its starting point.

Findings

The development of workforce modernization in the police service would appear to have eroded the hitherto “reform‐resistant” nature of policing, however political factors continue to impede reform.

Research limitations/implications

Although more evidence concerning the scale and the outcomes of the reform process would be desirable, the main implication of this paper is that workforce modernization in the police is viable, but constrained by political factors.

Originality/value

Empirically, the paper focuses on developments in a sector – the police service – that has been neglected by the existing literature on workforce modernization; theoretically, it demonstrates the important influence often exercised by political contingencies over public sector workforce reform.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jim Smyth

In deeply divided societies such as Northern Ireland the question of police reform cannot be divorced from broader political issues. This article looks at the connections…

Abstract

In deeply divided societies such as Northern Ireland the question of police reform cannot be divorced from broader political issues. This article looks at the connections between police reform and the political process, in the particular context of the recommendations of the Patten Report, which put forward a framework for a fundamental reform of policing in Northern Ireland. The problems encountered during the subsequent reform process – both political and institutional – are discussed. It is argued that the model of a decentralized and democratically accountable police service, based on the core principle of community policing, although not fully realized, offers a model for policing in societies which are becoming increasingly multi‐ethnic.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Peter Joyce

The purpose of this paper is to consider the background of the proposal contained in the coalition government's Police and Social Responsibility legislation to replace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the background of the proposal contained in the coalition government's Police and Social Responsibility legislation to replace police authorities with directly elected police and crime commissioners (PCCs) and to evaluate the potential problems that will arise from this reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is library‐based, utilising a range of primary and secondary sources. The objectives of the research are addressed by examining a number of key themes: the creation of police authorities; the evolution of police authorities; the target regime; consequences of increased central control over policing; the Community Empowerment agenda; the reform of police authorities; the 2010 coalition government and PCCs; problems posed by PCCs; and the progress of reform.

Findings

The research established that the role performed by police authorities in the governance of policing was in need of reform, in particular because of their inability to ensure that local concerns were adequately addressed by their police forces. However, it is argued that replacing an authority with one single person possessing considerable powers over policing poses significant dangers which include the potential of this reform to politicise the police.

Originality/value

The paper presents a detailed analysis of a key aspect of coalition government policing policy and seeks to establish that what is proposed contains serious weaknesses which must be addressed in order to provide for a workable system of police governance. It is of relevance to those engaged in delivering policing, crime prevention and community safety agendas.

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