Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Eric Blaauw

This article describes three studies on several aspects of police custody in The Netherlands. The first study shows that the quality of accommodation, facilities…

Abstract

This article describes three studies on several aspects of police custody in The Netherlands. The first study shows that the quality of accommodation, facilities, interaction and differential treatment are substandard in Dutch police stations, but dependent of the organisational size, degree of specialisation of the custodial task and extensiveness of duty‐prescriptions and registration. Detention circumstances in police stations are worse than in remand centres. The second study reveals high prevalence rates of symptoms of depression and somatisation (SCL‐90) among police custody detainees. Police custody detainees' symptom levels are higher than those in a jail population and a male general population. The third study addresses the prevalence rates of suicides and other deaths in Dutch police custody in the period 1983‐1993 and shows that the mortality rate, suicide rate and deadly poisoning rate are higher than those in remand centres and the general population. The findings of the three studies demonstrate that police custody is an area of concern.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Ian Cummins

The custody environment is not designed nor can it hope to meet the needs of individuals who are experiencing acute mental distress. The article reports the findings of…

Abstract

The custody environment is not designed nor can it hope to meet the needs of individuals who are experiencing acute mental distress. The article reports the findings of analysis of the recorded incidents of self‐harm that occurred in the custody of one English police force during an eight‐month period in 2006. There were 168 such incidents in this period. The ratio of male/female detained persons, who harmed themselves was 3:1. The most common method used was a ligature either from the detained person's own clothes or the paper suits that are used in custody. Alcohol or substance misuse was identified as a clear risk factor. The police response is analysed and recommendations made for improved access to health care for those in custody.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Jonathan Houdmont

Stress research in the UK policing has largely neglected to account for variance in the type of psychosocial hazard officers are exposed to across policing roles…

1292

Abstract

Purpose

Stress research in the UK policing has largely neglected to account for variance in the type of psychosocial hazard officers are exposed to across policing roles, highlighting the need for role‐specific research that is capable of informing similarly specific stress reduction interventions. This study aimed to develop and assess exposure to a taxonomy of psychosocial hazards specific to the UK police custody work, consider the burnout profile of custody officers, explore relations between psychosocial hazard exposure and burnout, and compare the exposures of burned out and non‐burned out custody officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Preliminary focus groups identified a series of psychosocial hazards specific to the custody officer role. A questionnaire administered to custody officers within a UK territorial police force assessed exposure to these psychosocial hazards and burnout.

Findings

Twenty‐six custody‐specific psychosocial hazards were identified, across nine themes. The proportion of custody officers who reported a high degree of burnout was above that found in normative data. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that exposures were positively related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Unrelated t‐tests showed that respondents who reported high burnout also reported significantly higher exposures across all nine psychosocial hazard themes than those with sub‐threshold burnout scores.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the stress‐related working conditions of the UK custody officers. It provides a foundation for future large‐scale longitudinal studies concerned with validating the current findings and improving the health of officers engaged in this unique policing role.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Layla Skinns, Lindsey Rice, Amy Sprawson and Andrew Wooff

The purpose of this paper is to examine how police authority – in its “soft” form – is used and understood by staff and detainees in police custody in England, examining…

2688

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how police authority – in its “soft” form – is used and understood by staff and detainees in police custody in England, examining how these meanings are shaped by this unique police setting. It is argued that the nature of this setting, as fraught and uncertain, along with the large volume of citizens who come into contact with the police therein, makes police custody the ultimate “teachable moment”.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper is based on in-depth qualitative data collected between March 2014 and May 2015 in four custody suites (in four forces). In each site, the researchers spent three to four weeks observing and then interviewed 10-15 staff (largely police officers, detention officers but also a few other criminal justice practitioners) and 10-15 detainees. In total, the paper is based on 532 hours of observing and 97 interviews (47 with staff and 50 with detainees).

Findings

One way that the staff used their authority in the custody suites in the research was softly and innocuously; this entailed for example staff communicating in a respectful manner with detainees, such as by being deliberately polite. The authors conclude that this “soft” power was a dynamic, processual matter, shaped in particular by the physical conditions of the suite, the uncertain and insecure nature of detainees’ circumstances, as well as by the sense of disempowerment they felt as a result of being deprived of their liberty and autonomy, all of which contributed to police custody being the ultimate “teachable moment”.

Originality/value

The paper draws on a range of qualitative data collected from both staff and detainees in four types of police custody suites as part the “good” police custody study. It therefore makes an original contribution to the field which has tended to rely on cross-sectional surveys of citizens not policed populations (Harkin, 2015; Worden and Mclean, 2017).

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Ian Cummins

One effect of the policy of deinstitutionalisation has been to increase police contact with people, who are experiencing the effects of acute mental illness. Policy…

Abstract

One effect of the policy of deinstitutionalisation has been to increase police contact with people, who are experiencing the effects of acute mental illness. Policy documents such as Home Office circular 66/90 recognise that adults with mental health problems are especially vulnerable within the criminal justice system. The overall aim of policy is that vulnerable adults should be diverted to mental health services at the earliest opportunity unless the offence is so serious that this would not be in the public interest. However, there is little concrete evidence of the success of this policy. The result is that police officers have an increasing role to play in working with individuals experiencing acute mental health problems. In this process, custody officers have a key role to play as decision‐makers as to whether the protections that PACE (1984) offers to vulnerable adults should apply. This article is based on a small‐scale indicative research study, which examined how officers make these decisions and the training that they receive relating to mental health issues.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Ian Cummins

The purpose of the paper is to report the findings of a small scale indicative research project. The project explores the assessment of detained persons in police custody

818

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to report the findings of a small scale indicative research project. The project explores the assessment of detained persons in police custody by Forensic Physicians (FP).

Design/methodology/approach

A range of information was collected in every case where custody staff had identified a mental health concern and requested an FP assessment. As well as information about demographic factors, this would include questions regarding any links that the individuals had with community‐based mental health services. As well as this information, anonymous custody records and force adverse incident records for the month were examined.

Findings

In the month of the project, 59 FP assessments were requested. Only six members of this group had any contact with community‐based mental health services: two with a social worker, two with a CPN and two with a psychiatrist. Of this group, three had not been in contact with mental health services for over a month.

Research limitations/implications

The size of the cohort and variety of arrangements for providing nursing and social care support in custody settings may limit the generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

This study highlights that there is a group of individuals whose mental health causes concern to the police in a custody environment. In this study, the overwhelming majority of the group have no contact with mental health services. The research supports the recommendations of the Bradley Review for wider health care provision in custody settings.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that fully effective community mental health services need to consider police custody settings as a key point for intervention.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Leonie Howe

This paper addresses the issue of deaths in police custody. The role and effects of ‘proactive’ and ‘reactive’ policing in addressing suicidal and non‐suicidal deaths is…

Abstract

This paper addresses the issue of deaths in police custody. The role and effects of ‘proactive’ and ‘reactive’ policing in addressing suicidal and non‐suicidal deaths is considered. Failings in the training and public accountability of police services and forensic medical examiners are discussed. Some of the past failings, it is argued, seem set to continue in the face of the Secrecy Bill (1999).

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Andrew Forrester, Chiara Samele, Karen Slade, Tom Craig and Lucia Valmaggia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of suicide ideation amongst a group of people who had been arrested and taken into police custody, and were then…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of suicide ideation amongst a group of people who had been arrested and taken into police custody, and were then referred to a mental health service operating in the police stations.

Design/methodology/approach

A referred sample of 888 cases were collected over an 18-month period during 2012/2013. Clinical assessments were conducted using a template in which background information was collected (including information about their previous clinical history, substance misuse, alleged offence, any pre-identified diagnoses, and the response of the service) as part of the standard operating procedure of the service. Data were analysed using a statistical software package.

Findings

In total, 16.2 per cent (n=144) reported suicide ideation, with women being more likely to report than men. In total, 82.6 per cent of the suicide ideation sample reported a history of self-harm or a suicide attempt. Suicide ideation was also associated with certain diagnostic categories (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and personality disorder), a history of contact with mental health services, and recent (within 24 hours) consumption of alcohol or drugs.

Originality/value

This evaluation adds to the limited literature in this area by describing a large sample from a real clinical service. It provides information that can assist with future service designs and it offers support for calls for a standardised health screening process, better safety arrangements for those who have recently used alcohol or drugs (within 24 hours) and integrated service delivery across healthcare domains (i.e. physical healthcare, substance use, and mental health).

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Andrew Greasley

Presents a simulation study of the costing of police custody operations at a UK police force. The custody operation incorporates the arrest, booking‐in, interview…

1968

Abstract

Presents a simulation study of the costing of police custody operations at a UK police force. The custody operation incorporates the arrest, booking‐in, interview, detention and court appearance activities. The Activity Based Costing (ABC) approach is used as a framework to show how costs are generated by the three “drivers” of cost, activity and resource. These relate to the design efficiency of the process, the timing and mix of demand on the process and the cost of resources used to undertake the process respectively. The use of discrete‐event simulation allows the incorporation of dynamic (time‐dependent) and stochastic (variability) elements in the cost analysis. This enables both the amount and timing of the use of capacity and the generation of cost to be established. The concept of committed and flexible resources directs management decisions to the redeployment of unused capacity or alternatively the identification of additional capacity requirements.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sheree Brewin and Andrew Bailey

This paper describes the current guidance in the Police and Criminal Evidence (NI) Order and associated codes of practice as they relate to the detention and questioning…

Abstract

This paper describes the current guidance in the Police and Criminal Evidence (NI) Order and associated codes of practice as they relate to the detention and questioning of juveniles and vulnerable adults. The provision of appropriate adults services is described with reference to a recent research study and recommendations made in the Criminal Justice Review, commissioned as part of the Good Friday Agreement.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000