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Article

Poh Yen Ng, Poh-Ling Ho and Joseph Kee-Ming Sia

This paper positions environmental concern as the antecedent of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control. It also sets to expand the theory of planned…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper positions environmental concern as the antecedent of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control. It also sets to expand the theory of planned behaviour by including two condition factors: favourable situation and facility availability on the intention to separate food waste at source.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collects data by using self-administered questionnaires on 682 respondents in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling is employed to test the conceptual model and the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that environmental concern positively influences attitude and subjective norms, which, in turn, influences food waste separation intention. Favourable situation and facility availability are found to influence the separation intention.

Originality/value

This study is one of the earliest studies to investigate residents’ intention to participate in food waste separation at a source that employs the expanded theory of planned behaviour with environmental concern and condition factors.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article

Mumin Dayan, Ibrahim A. Al Kuwaiti, Zafar Husain, Poh Yen Ng and Aysenur Dayan

The aim of this research is to uncover issues that inhibit patients' satisfaction and loyalty and identify factors that could enhance customer retention by government…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to uncover issues that inhibit patients' satisfaction and loyalty and identify factors that could enhance customer retention by government hospitals in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The mediating impact of outpatient satisfaction on service quality, word of mouth (WoM), hospital image, outpatient–physician relationship and outpatient loyalty were tested.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample data used to test the hypotheses were drawn from a pool of patients served by a government healthcare agency in Abu Dhabi. Questionnaires were provided to 418 participants using methods such as short message service, e-mail and face-to-face delivery. The data were analyzed using SmartPLS 3.3.2 software.

Findings

The results indicate that service quality, WoM and outpatient–physician relationship positively impact outpatient satisfaction and indirectly effect outpatient loyalty; that hospital image positively impacts outpatient satisfaction and loyalty and has a partially mediating effect on loyalty; that waiting time satisfaction has no effect on outpatient satisfaction and no moderating effect on the outpatient satisfaction–loyalty relationship and that switching cost has a positive effect on loyalty but no moderating effect on the outpatient satisfaction–loyalty relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of this study concerns the fact that only patients who had previously been served by these hospitals' outpatient units were included. Furthermore, the research was not able to obtain extensive findings related to the various factors that negatively impacted patient satisfaction and loyalty among all of the departments of government hospitals, such as inpatient care and emergency care.

Practical implications

Centered on the findings from this research, increasing switching costs would prevent patients from switching to other healthcare providers. Therefore, it has the potential to create a false loyalty or a hostage customer (Jones and Sasser, 1995). Additionally, making patients feel connected to their treatment plan and engaged in their care by developing a tool to maintain their enthusiasm about their health is important. It is therefore recommended that government hospital care providers and management consider providing online tools that patients can use to self-manage their care.

Social implications

The results regarding patients' satisfaction level suggest several areas for improvement. The first pertains to waiting area entertainment and comfort because patients indicated that there is not enough entertainment or ways to pass the time when waiting for services. In addition to enhancing the entertainment and comfort of waiting areas, government hospital staff should maintain contact with patients who are waiting to ensure that they are aware of the time they will spend. Another area for improvement is the parking lot. During summer, patients prefer to walk less in the sun, which causes them to seek parking closer to the door. Government hospital management should consider different methods for transporting patients closer to the door, such as golf carts or valet services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the mediating impact of outpatients' satisfaction between its antecedents and loyalty in the UAE. These results provide an improved understanding of the factors influencing patient choices and establish more accurate methods for increasing patient loyalty to retain more patients.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Book part

Balakrishnan Muniapan

There are ten universal principles of United Nations Global Compact in four areas namely human rights, labour, environmental and anti-corruption, and this chapter will…

Abstract

Purpose

There are ten universal principles of United Nations Global Compact in four areas namely human rights, labour, environmental and anti-corruption, and this chapter will explore the sixth principle of labour standard on elimination of discrimination in employment and occupation, in particular the doctrine of constructive dismissal in Malaysian labour relations. Constructive dismissal is creating a new challenge in labour relation in Malaysia.

Methodology/approach

This chapter specifically analyses some of the constructive dismissal awards and its implication to labour relations in Malaysia. The methodology employed in this chapter is the analysis of case laws using criterion-based sampling from the Industrial and Superior Court awards on constructive dismissal.

Findings

There has been an increasing number of awards on constructive dismissal made by the Malaysian Industrial Court over the last nine years. From the year 2009–2013, the Industrial Court has made 663 awards on constructive dismissal, mostly against employers. With compensation awarded to each employee amounted to as much as 24 months of back-pay salary plus a month’s pay for every year of service, employers can no longer neglect this pressing issue.

Research limitations/implications

The concept of constructive dismissal falls within the purview of section 20 of the Industrial Relations Act 1967 in Malaysia. Constructive dismissal is a ‘deemed dismissal’ if an employer is guilty of a breach of the employment contract which goes to the root of the contract. It arises when a workman terminates his/her contract of employment and considers himself/herself discharged from further obligations because of the employer’s conduct.

Practical implications

With a good understanding of the constructive dismissal awards, it is expected that organizations will manage and treat their human resources as their greatest assets and prevent constructive dismissal claims from taking place. This will eventually help to improve and maintain harmonious labour relations. This chapter is likely to provide insights into the Malaysian labour relations environment for international business operations.

Originality/value

In the context of Malaysian labour relations, studies on constructive dismissal are limited as it is considered as a new area and a specific area of study. This chapter therefore hopes to fill the existing gap in the literature, to highlight some of the recent awards and lessons to prevent constructive dismissal claims from taking place and generally to contribute to the constructive dismissal literature.

Details

Beyond the UN Global Compact: Institutions and Regulations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-558-1

Keywords

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Article

M. Ariff, P.K. Chan and L.W. Johnson

Three years after the introduction of exchange‐traded options on the American scene, a call options market was made with ten popular common stocks in Singapore in early…

Abstract

Three years after the introduction of exchange‐traded options on the American scene, a call options market was made with ten popular common stocks in Singapore in early 1977. Only calls were traded and no puts were introduced. After six months of trading actively, volume dwindled, and the market was withdrawn in early 1980. Three currency options markets introduced in 1987 continues to thrive at the time of this study. The reason for the demise of the call options market is mainly the significant mispricing of the contracts as most contracts were systematically above the theoretical fair prices. Low volatility in the spot market after the calls were introduced, availability of alternative speculative instrument for traders, high transaction costs and the lack of knowledge about the complexity of options trades are suggested as reasons for the failure of the market. As a new options market has been introduced again in March, 1993, it is worthwhile to learn from the past.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

Fotis Vouzas and Theano Katsogianni

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an exploratory literature review investigating the similarities and differences in TQM implementation between 3PL…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an exploratory literature review investigating the similarities and differences in TQM implementation between 3PL organisations and organisations with an in-house logistics function.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected all relevant papers covering both types of organisations implementing TQM worldwide in a time period from 1991 until today. The aim was to identify key papers and analyse its contents based on the quality of services provided by these two types of organisations.

Findings

The survey contains information about the forces that encourage managers to implement quality practices in the logistics function, the reasons that impeded the implementation of such a quality programme, the quality methods being used and also the level of their satisfaction with the current quality management in logistics.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only mentioned the principal papers that have been published globally from 1991 – today.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the few that reviewed literature from the year 1991 – today in order to provide a comparison of quality management practices between 3PLs and in-house Logistics organisations.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article

Fraser McLeay, Andrew Robson and Mazirah Yusoff

The constantly evolving higher education (HE) sector is creating a need for new business models and tools for evaluating performance. In this paper, an overview of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The constantly evolving higher education (HE) sector is creating a need for new business models and tools for evaluating performance. In this paper, an overview of the importance-performance analysis (IPA) model and its applicability as a management tool for assessing student satisfaction in the HE sector is provided. The purpose of this paper is to apply IPA in a new and novel manner, undertaking analysis at three levels; the individual student, for individual attributes and at a construct or factor level which combines individual attributes that are correlated. A practical application is illustrated, assessing the gap between the importance placed on specific student satisfaction attributes and corresponding levels of student-perceived performance realised.

Design/methodology/approach

The “service product bundle” (Douglas et al., 2006) is refined based on focus group evaluation. Survey responses from 823 students studying across four Malaysian private universities are analysed using factor analysis and the IPA model utilised to identify importance-performance gaps and explore the implication of the iso-rating line as well as alternative cut-off zones.

Findings

Factor reduction of 33 original measurement items results in eight definable areas of service provision, which provides a refined and extended management tool of statistically reliable and valid constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The research is undertaken in a private business school context in Malaysia. Further research could focus on other universities or countries, as well as faculties such as computing and engineering or explore other elements of education-based performance.

Practical implications

The research method and study outcomes can support HE managers to allocate resources more effectively and develop strategies to improve quality and increase student satisfaction.

Originality/value

Distinct from other IPA-based studies, analysis is undertaken at three levels; the individual participant, for individual items and at the factor level.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article

Sirinya Phulkerd, Sasinee Thapsuwan, Natjera Thongcharoenchupong, Rossarin Soottipong Gray and Aphichat Chamratrithirong

The sociodemographic determinants of insufficient fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption in the general population in Thailand remain understudied. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The sociodemographic determinants of insufficient fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption in the general population in Thailand remain understudied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between sociodemographic characteristics and insufficient FV consumption in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This nationally representative survey employed a cross-sectional multi-stage sampling design. A total of 6,991 individuals aged 15 years or older participated in the study. Information on participants' FV consumption and sociodemographic characteristics were collected via questionnaire. The data were analyzed using binary logistic regression.

Findings

The overall prevalence of insufficient FV consumption in the study sample was 65.6%. Age of the participants, sex, marital status, place of residence, occupation, income and education were found to be significantly associated with insufficient FV consumption among this sample of the Thai population.

Originality/value

Findings suggest the need for promotion of FV consumption and intervention policies aimed at increasing FV intake by taking into account sociodemographic characteristics of the population.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

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