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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Catherine Hayes, Sonia Bussey and Yitka Graham

Situated and experiential learning methodologies are largely underresearched in relation to student experience and satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to illuminate…

Abstract

Purpose

Situated and experiential learning methodologies are largely underresearched in relation to student experience and satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the perspectives of students studying on a BSc (Hons) Podiatry degree programme to establish perceptions of their experience in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretivist methodological framework, Free Association Narrative Interviewing was used to provide an insight into the perceived impact that experiential learning in clinical placements had on undergraduate podiatry students.

Findings

Students perceived that what could not be taught but what could be experienced, contributed much to the confidence that students had gained during their training and which they anticipated would be further developed during the initial years of their training in practice, particularly in the context of the NHS.

Research limitations/implications

This is a study from which it is acknowledged that within the underpinning research design and methodology there is no scope for generalisability.

Practical implications

The study highlights an appreciation for the implication and recognition of “tacit” knowledge, currently recognised in medical curricula as an asset which can aid a move towards higher order critical thinking skills.

Social implications

Student acknowledgement of the need for emphasis on “soft skills” can be posited, in the context of this small-scale study as an appreciation for affective domain learning in the context of podiatric academic and clinical curricula.

Originality/value

Limited information from the extant literature is available in relation to the illumination of podiatry student placement experiences, so this research contributes to an effectively underresearched field.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Penelope Renwick

Outlines the development of the profession of podiatry, and its regulatory bodies. Highlights areas of podiatric practice which are currently under scrutiny in terms of…

Abstract

Outlines the development of the profession of podiatry, and its regulatory bodies. Highlights areas of podiatric practice which are currently under scrutiny in terms of the quality of care being delivered to the patient. Considers the position of this profession in relation to the recent changes in health care in the United Kingdom and the possibility of changes in the finding of podiatric education, these changes being a direct result of the 1989 NHS Review. Finally, makes certain recommendations designed to inform and assist the profession of podiatry in the development of a cohesive quality assurance strategy, such a strategy being central to the effective delivery of health care in the NHS of the 1990s.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Susan Nancarrow, Anna Johns and Wesley Vernon

This paper discusses the practicalities and limitations of establishing a service user consultation group to guide service developments, based on the evaluation of a…

Abstract

This paper discusses the practicalities and limitations of establishing a service user consultation group to guide service developments, based on the evaluation of a podiatry patient panel in South Yorkshire. It describes the specific difficulties in recruiting a representative panel of service users, and the gradual acculturation of the panel from a group of challenging activists to unpaid members of the podiatry department.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Carmen Coronado, Carla Freijomil-Vázquez, Sara Fernández-Basanta, Elena Andina-Díaz and María-Jesús Movilla-Fernández

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula, the university can shape student personality with sustainability concerns. This study aims to present the results of a teaching approach on environmental sustainability using the photovoice methodology. A guided visit to the sewage treatment plant of A Coruña was included as a teaching activity in the “Microbiology and Parasitology” classes of the podiatry degree at University of A Coruña. The teaching objectives were to reinforce contents through observation and to introduce citizen awareness on sustainability and responsible water use in a cross-sectional manner.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case study, different steps of photovoice as a qualitative participatory action methodology were developed. A total of 43 university students willingly participated with their photographs. Qualitative data were collected from the students’ photovoice visit reports and a subsequent discussion group. Thematic content analysis was performed manually.

Findings

This study explored the impact of an environmental sustainability teaching activity on the university student community. Six main categories emerged from the qualitative analysis: savings/waste of water, misuse of the water closet, disposing of used oil, solid waste/trash, reuse of clean water and reuse/reduction of the use of plastics. The cross-sectional findings on the needs of education and awareness of sustainability in the community and companies are presented.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence of the ability of photovoice method as a pedagogical tool to promote reflection and change in the university community and to introduce sustainability cross-sectional content in green campus curricula. This photovoice experiment is simple and feasible to implement and has a very low economic cost, as long as there are qualified educators.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present and describe the main actions carried out in six different faculties and common areas such as cultural and research centres and administrative buildings in the Ferrol campus at the University of A Coruña to achieve the second green flag on a Galician University.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study describing the steps for implementing a green campus programme in a medium-size, young university campus integrated into a small city. An Environmental Campus Committee was created to assess the main factors that affect environmental footprint, discuss sustainability initiatives and develop a guide to action regarding different goals related to sustainable transport options, energy, water conservation and waste reduction. The actions included several fields such as education, circular economy and healthy life and involved the on and off-campus community.

Findings

The programme achieved a decrease in water consumption and electrical energy. An important change in educational values and behaviours regarding sustainability was observed in and out of the campus community. The measurements adopted mainly in waste management, mobility and education led the Ferrol campus to achieve a green campus flag on November 2019.

Originality/value

This experiment can serve as a guide to establish the Green Campus philosophy in other similar university campuses.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Cherylea J. Browne

Introductory anatomy and physiology provide a core knowledge base to students within clinical health science courses. Increased student numbers, as well as reduced access…

Abstract

Purpose

Introductory anatomy and physiology provide a core knowledge base to students within clinical health science courses. Increased student numbers, as well as reduced access to laboratory-based cadaveric resources, have created a need for enhanced learning approaches to support learning. The streamlining of courses has also resulted in the need to effectively engage course sub-groups within large units. The purpose of this paper is to utilize the eLearning activities to investigate engagement and satisfaction levels within students undertaking an anatomy and physiology unit.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 19 formative quizzes were made available to students. Online practical anatomy laboratories covered anatomical content, and physiology quizzes covered physiological content. Student engagement was compared using frequency analysis across students studying varying courses. Satisfaction was determined by analyzing student’s feedback using frequency analysis.

Findings

Students accessed the learning activities 29,898 times over semester, with the peak access (37 percent) prior to the closed book exams. The resources were utilized primarily as an exam preparation tool rather than consistently throughout semester. Out of the various courses, the Paramedicine, Physiotherapy and Podiatry students were the most engaged, with the highest percent of “engaged/highly engaged” students. Students from various courses shared very similar views of the perceived benefit of the eLearning activities.

Practical implications

These results indicated a difference in engagement levels between the students of various course sub-groups, and therefore suggests that the development of course-specific eLearning activities is necessary in large, streamlined units to achieve a more focused approach to support students’ learning, engagement and success, so that positive and beneficial learning experiences are ensured for all students.

Originality/value

These results suggest that in the future, development of eLearning activities is necessary to achieve a more focused approach to support students’ learning, engagement and success, so that positive and beneficial learning experiences are ensured for all.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Paul D. Blakeman

Interviews and observation of NHS state‐registered chiropody (podiatry) has been used to study the effects of NHS reforms on professional identity, which inevitably…

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1328

Abstract

Interviews and observation of NHS state‐registered chiropody (podiatry) has been used to study the effects of NHS reforms on professional identity, which inevitably yielded information on management processes. This paper adapts and expands Hood's interpretation of Douglas's grid/group cultural theory model. Here it is expanded into a three‐dimensional model to reflect on local managers attitude to regulation; strength of allegiance to different stakeholder groups; and to the level of monitoring and accountability. This expanded model can be used in management evaluation by categorising attitudes in high‐order hierarchist, entrepreneurialist, covert fatalist or pseudo‐egalitarianist management trends. A manager drawn from a profession who identifies with the core professional ethos resents increased measures of monitoring and accountability retreating to the regulatory frameworks, pointing to inconsistencies between those of the organisation and the profession. Other profession based managers less inclined to worry about regulatory frameworks were more prepared to monitor staff often presenting a pseudo‐egalitarian environment where talk of “empowering” left staff feeling less empowered.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Rosalie Coppin and Greg Fisher

Mentoring is widely used in the health sector, particularly for early career professionals in the public health system. However, many allied health professionals are…

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring is widely used in the health sector, particularly for early career professionals in the public health system. However, many allied health professionals are employed in private practice and rely on their professional association to provide mentoring support and training. This mentoring context is under-researched. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposeful sample of 15 allied health professionals were interviewed using semi-structured interviews that were then analyzed using template analysis.

Findings

The many-to-many group mentoring program delivered valuable knowledge, diagnostic skills and networking opportunities but did not provide inclusion, role modeling or psychosocial support to participants. Also identified were structural and operational issues including; the role of the coordinator in addressing contribution reluctance and participant confidence, confidentiality issues, lack of mentor training and overall organization of the program.

Practical implications

Group mentoring is a valuable method of delivery for professional associations. The many-to-many group mentoring model is beneficial in a situation where the availability of mentors is limited. Further, the importance of having a dedicated program coordinator and a skilled facilitator is emphasized.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the limited literature on many-to-many group mentoring by reviewing the effectiveness of an existing many-to-many group mentoring program for allied health professionals delivered by a professional association.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Deon V. Canyon

Corporate culture is a product of managerial mindset and it consists of obscured, undisclosed and unconditionally accepted assumptions that underlie corporate behaviour…

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1430

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate culture is a product of managerial mindset and it consists of obscured, undisclosed and unconditionally accepted assumptions that underlie corporate behaviour. This study seeks to investigate the extent of corporate mindset since it is a causal factor in crises.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained by questionnaire from decision-making executives in hospitals, medical centres, aged care, pharmacies, dental clinics and practices in physiotherapy, chiropractic and podiatry.

Findings

Organizations were judged to be in a state of medium disavowal concerning their belief that the impact of any crisis would be small. Around two thirds of participants indicated that the general mind-set of organizations contributes to effective crisis management, and that a welcoming attitude would prevail in the event of the implementation of a organization-wide, systems-wide, crisis management program. With regard to denial mechanisms or beliefs that hinder effective crisis management, two-thirds indicated inactive/passive resistance and one-third indicated active/aggressive resistance. The reasons for resistance were apathy, anti-change, and concern about cost.

Originality/value

Cultural opposition to crisis preparedness varies significantly between organizations and poses a major barrier to effective crisis management. This study empowers health leaders by identifying several mindset changes that are required to create crisis-resilient health organisations.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Reva Berman Brown and Louise Bell

This article aims to describe the research process, and the development of the instrument now employed in auditing patients' perceptions of quality improvement in a…

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2058

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe the research process, and the development of the instrument now employed in auditing patients' perceptions of quality improvement in a community health care trust in a coastal town in Essex, England.

Design/methodology/approach

The new instrument is currently being implemented and the findings thus far are described.

Findings

The instrument has measured health outcomes in terms of quality improvement from the users' perspective, and has also highlighted gaps between what the service offers in terms of quality and users' perceptions of what is delivered. The study demonstrates the importance of the professional role in quality improvement.

Originality/value

Patient‐centred quality improvement audit should be undertaken regularly so that both non‐clinical managers and health care professionals can establish whether or not they are providing services that are patient‐friendly and effective from the user's viewpoint. In the course of their work, professionals and managers discuss patients and speak on their behalf in various forums, and knowing what patients actually expect and perceive before speaking on their behalf may be of great benefit in such instances.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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