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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Arch G. Woodside

Abstract

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Case study
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Ya-Hsueh Chuang, Tsan-Ching Kang, Wen-Ching Chang and Po-Ju Chen

By the end of this session, students should be able to: explain what a business model is; summarize the case firm’s business strategy using the elements of business model…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

By the end of this session, students should be able to: explain what a business model is; summarize the case firm’s business strategy using the elements of business model canvas proposed by Alexander Osterwalder and practice how to apply the business model canvas to analyze the business model of a firm; understand how a firm can seize an opportunity for innovation; and discuss how the case firm navigated through problems that came up as it grew.

Case overview/synopsis

Creative Design was a start-up company in Taiwan. To fulfill a course requirement while she was still in school, the founder had formed a team and entered an entrepreneurship competition. They won the second runner up award in that competition and impressed some firms who enquired if they would be interested in doing corporate identity system (CIS) design. They discovered that without establishing a corporate structure their prospective clients would be unable to pay an invoice. As a consequence, the founder and one of the team members established Creative Design Ltd. This case discusses the challenge Creative Design faced at the end of 2012. Wonderland farmers’ association (WFA) wanted to market locally grown jasmine but did not know how to go about it. They reached out to the founder and her company for assistance. The case of WFA was uncharted territory. Creative Design already had extensive experience in CIS design, but it did not have any experience in handling agriculture products. In this case, they had to deal with the full supply chain from production to exhibition. The risk for this project was high but Creative Design accepted the case and became the first design firm offering a “total solution.” Currently, Creative Design works with all kinds of cases, from simple CIS designs to more complicated total solutions of various scales. The founder now has to contemplate if the design house should develop more total solution cases. Doing so would require recruiting more staff and the dilemma of balancing revenue and costs.

Complexity academic level

The case study is designed for the undergraduate and graduate students of the College of Management; the case can be adopted for the courses of management, innovation and entrepreneurship, etc.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS: 3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Tingting Zhang, Can Lu, Edwin Torres and Po-Ju Chen

This paper aims to develop a theoretical model to understand co-creation/co-destruction of value through customer engagement in online channels. It also investigates the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a theoretical model to understand co-creation/co-destruction of value through customer engagement in online channels. It also investigates the contributing factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative approach uses the critical incidents technique to answer the research questions. The authors identify 350 critical incidents in which customers expressed online customer engagement-induced value co-creation or co-destruction experiences. The factors and resulting propositions are identified through data analysis. Data coding and analysis are facilitated by using MAXQDA 12.

Findings

Co-creation through positively valenced engagement behaviors may occur when customers are delighted, feel valued, experience reciprocity, receive organizational incentives, are solicited for feedback, can count on service recovery efforts and interact with helpful, empathetic, polite and responsive employees. Co-destruction through negatively valenced engagement behaviors emerges from rude employee behaviors, indifference, confrontation with company representatives, technological failure, the lack of complaint outlets and customers’ desire for revenge.

Practical implications

Selecting and training employees to be helpful, polite, responsive and empathetic toward online visitors can trigger co-creation. Communication between firms and customers should boost customer approval and delight. Organizations can offer incentives, reliable service delivery and a recovery design to stimulate visitor participation. Soliciting feedback requires sound technological support and direct communication links with visitors.

Originality/value

This study presents the conditions and framework contributing to the duality of customer engagement-induced co-creation and co-destruction values in online channels from the customer, organizational, employee, service design and technological perspectives. It also addresses how value is co-created or co-destructed through examples.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Fevzi Okumus, Po-Ju Chen, Nelson A. Barber, Wilco Chan and Willy Legrand

893

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2022

Resat Arıca, Inci Polat, Cihan Cobanoglu, Abdülkadir Çorbacı, Po-Ju Chen and Meng-Jun Hsu

The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of value co-destruction on customer citizenship and negative electronic word of mouth (e-WOM) behaviors. In addition, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of value co-destruction on customer citizenship and negative electronic word of mouth (e-WOM) behaviors. In addition, the study aims to determine the mediating role of tourist citizenship between value co-destruction and negative e-WOM behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a convenience sampling method, data were collected from 704 customers, who purchased their touristic products through co-creation. The exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were applied to the data obtained to determine the factors that make up the dimensions in the research model. The partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to evaluate the relationship in the research model proposed in the study.

Findings

The results of the study indicated that value co-destruction had an effect on customer citizenship behavior and negative e-WOM. While the helping behavior of customer citizenship had an effect on negative e-WOM, the advocacy behavior of customer citizenship had no effect on negative e-WOM. However, this study found only an indirect mediation effect of helping behavior in the relationship between value co-destruction and negative e-WOM.

Research limitations/implications

The research examined the antecedent behaviors that cause value co-destruction and the effects of these behaviors on the outcomes of the holiday experience. This information then was combined in a model and evaluated in a holistic framework. Theoretically, the research helps us understand the impact of value co-destruction behavior on citizenship behavior and on tourists’ negative e-WOM tendency. The research examines value co-destruction behavior and its effect on holiday-experience outcomes simultaneously.

Practical implications

The research provides a framework that tourism enterprises can use to produce and offer value-attributing services for their customers and to manage dysfunctional and disruptive business processes and behaviors to reduce value co-destruction. The research also provides a new way for practitioners in the tourism sector to understand and generalize the behavioral changes of tourists caused by value co-destruction during and after their experience.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to an understanding of value co-destruction antecedents and outputs from the customer perspective. Further, the research provides information to tourism businesses to effectively and efficiently manage the value co-creation process and prevent value co-destruction. The findings of the study will provide useful suggestions that will contribute to researchers and sectoral representatives.

价值共毁和负面的电子口碑行为:游客公民身份的中介作用

摘要

研究目的

本论文研究价值共毁对于顾客公民行为和负面网络口碑行为的影响。此外, 本论文还将指明游客公民行为在价值共毁与负面网络口碑行为的中介作用。

研究方法

本论文采用便利抽样法, 研究样本为704名顾客, 他们曾通过价值共创过程来购买旅游产品。本论文使用了探索性数据分析和验证性数据分析法, 以分析研究模型中的各种变量和维度。通过偏最小平方-方程结构模型(PLS-SEM)数据分析, 本论文验证了研究模型中的各种假设变量关系。

研究结果

本论文研究结果表明, 价值共毁对顾客公民行为和负面网络口碑行为有显着影响。顾客公民行为中的帮助行为对负面网络口碑行为有显着影响, 然而, 顾客公民行为中的拥护行为并未对负面口碑传播行为有显着影响。此外, 本论文发现了一条中介因子的间接效应:帮助行为对于价值共毁和负面网络口碑行为之间的中介效应。

研究原创性

本论文从顾客角度, 解释了价值共毁的前因后果。此外, 本论文研究结果建议旅游业如何有效率和效能地管理价值共创过程, 防止价值共毁情况出现。本论文研究结果还为其他研究学者和行业代表提供了有用的建议。

研究理论启示

本论文研究了价值共创的影响因素, 以及其对于度假体验的影响。本论文创立了一个整体研究模型, 概括了价值共创的前因后果, 并且提供了模型实证结果。理论上, 本论文帮助认知了价值共毁行为对于公民行为和游客负面网络口碑意愿的影响。本论文研究了价值共毁行为, 以及同时其对于度假体验的影响。

研究管理启示

本论文中的模型可作为商业模型, 供旅游企业使用, 以向其顾客提供高价值服务, 同时能够管理失效和破坏性的商业服务流程和行为, 以减少价值共毁。本论文还为旅游行业人士提供了一条新思路, 以了解和总结在旅游度假中和度假后的价值共毁所造成的游客行为的种种改变。

研究限制与未来研究

本论文有几项限制以供未来研究考虑。本论文的样本为曾通过价值共创以购买旅游体验的顾客。因此, 本论文结果可能无法适用于其他类型的游客。本论文还只从需求方面来研究价值共毁。此外, 本论文提供了一些初级验证结果, 解释了旅游业中的价值共毁行为的前因后果, 未来研究应该拓展这个研究, 加入其他因素, 管理价值共毁和价值共毁的后果, 避免企业受到价值共毁的影响。

Co-destrucción de valor y comportamiento negativo de e-wom: el papel mediador de la ciudadanía de los turistas

Resumen

Objetivo/Propósito

La investigación ha examinado el efecto de la destrucción conjunta de valor en la ciudadanía del cliente y en los comportamientos negativos de e-WOM. Además, la investigación tuvo como objetivo determinar el papel mediador de la ciudadanía turística entre la co-destrucción de valor y los comportamientos negativos de e-WOM.

Metodología

Utilizando un método de muestreo por conveniencia, se recopilaron datos de 704 clientes que compraron sus productos turísticos a través de un proceso de cocreación. Se aplicaron análisis factoriales exploratorios y confirmatorios a los datos para determinar los factores que componen las dimensiones en el modelo de investigación. Se utilizó el modelo de ecuaciones estructurales de mínimos cuadrados parciales (PLS-SEM) para evaluar la relación en el modelo de investigación propuesto en la investigación.

Resultados

Los resultados de la investigación indicaron que la co-destrucción de valor afectó el comportamiento de ciudadanía del cliente y el e-WOM negativo. Mientras que el comportamiento de ayuda de la ciudadanía del cliente afectó al e-WOM negativo, el comportamiento de defensa de la ciudadanía del cliente no afectó al e-WOM negativo. La investigación, sin embargo, encontró un efecto de mediación solo indirecto: un comportamiento de ayuda en la relación entre la co-destrucción de valor y el e-WOM negativo.

Originalidad

El documento ayuda a explicar los antecedentes y los resultados de la co-destrucción de valor desde la perspectiva del cliente. Además, su información puede permitir a las empresas turísticas gestionar de forma eficaz y eficiente el proceso de creación conjunta de valor y evitar la destrucción conjunta de valor. Los datos de la investigación también proporcionarán sugerencias útiles a otros investigadores y representantes del sector.

Implicaciones Teóricas

La investigación ha examinado los comportamientos antecedentes que causan la destrucción conjunta de valores y los efectos de estos comportamientos en los resultados de la experiencia vacacional. Esta información luego se combinó en un modelo y se evaluó en un marco holístico. Teóricamente, la investigación nos ayuda a comprender el impacto del comportamiento de co-destrucción de valor en el comportamiento de la ciudadanía y en la tendencia negativa de e-WOM de los turistas. La investigación examina el comportamiento de co-destrucción de valor y su efecto en los resultados de la experiencia vacacional simultáneamente.

Implicaciones Gerenciales

La investigación proporciona un marco que las empresas turísticas pueden usar para producir y ofrecer servicios que atribuyan valor a sus clientes y para gestionar procesos y comportamientos comerciales disfuncionales y disruptivos para reducir la co-destrucción de valor. La investigación también proporciona una nueva forma para que los profesionales del sector turístico comprendan y generalicen los cambios de comportamiento de los turistas causados por la destrucción conjunta de valor durante y después de su experiencia.

Limitación e Investigación Futura

Esta investigación tiene varias limitaciones que podrían sugerir direcciones para investigaciones futuras. Se seleccionó como escenario de investigación a los clientes que compran experiencias turísticas a través de un proceso de co-creación. Por esta razón, los resultados de esta investigación podrían no aplicarse a otros turistas. Esta investigación también examinó la co-destrucción de valor solo desde el lado de la demanda. Además, la investigación proporcionó evidencia preliminar sobre las premisas y los resultados de los comportamientos de co-destrucción de valor en el contexto del turismo. Además, la investigación futura podría intentar ampliar el presente trabajo mediante la identificación de factores adicionales que pueden gestionar la destrucción conjunta de valor y otros resultados de la destrucción conjunta de valor para las empresas.

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Yang-Su Chen and Po-Ju Chen

A British Airways flight crew arrives after a long flight from London to Chicago to find their hotel rooms are not ready for check-in. The front-desk agents tell them that…

Abstract

A British Airways flight crew arrives after a long flight from London to Chicago to find their hotel rooms are not ready for check-in. The front-desk agents tell them that the hotel is overbooked. The flight crew is asked to wait in the hotel lobby for more than one and a half hours while housekeepers prepare their rooms. Upon returning to London, the pilot complains to British Airways. What should the hotel have done differently to avoid complaints?

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Cheng Zhang and Po-Ju Chen

When a senior field journalist attempts to cover super typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, body guards were assigned to protect end-up obstructing. Disagreements between…

Abstract

When a senior field journalist attempts to cover super typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, body guards were assigned to protect end-up obstructing. Disagreements between the news team and security team followed. The teams had different opinions regarding how situations should be handled. The clients were not satisfied with the services provided by the security, while the security felt the clients failed to understand safety considerations. What should the security company have done to ensure safety while supporting the news team’s objectives?

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Jiangeng Yeh and Po-Ju Chen

An existing customer goes to his bank to apply for a debit card. The bank required that the customer provide additional supportive documents and complete a pending…

Abstract

An existing customer goes to his bank to apply for a debit card. The bank required that the customer provide additional supportive documents and complete a pending procedure. However, after two visits, the employee failed to inform the customer of the additional procedure that should be completed. With multiple visits to the bank to complete the application, the customer filed a complaint. What should the bank do?

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Eusebio C. Leou and Po-Ju Chen

Two hotel guests repeatedly took food from various breakfast buffets every morning before starting the daily tour. Not only is this considered a violation of etiquette, it…

Abstract

Two hotel guests repeatedly took food from various breakfast buffets every morning before starting the daily tour. Not only is this considered a violation of etiquette, it also violated the hotel restaurant policy. Following complaints from other tour group members, and a polite but firm request from a hotel restaurant manager to address the unacceptable behavior, the tour guide was faced with a dilemma. As the offenders were, after all, his customers, the guide risked offending his clients by asking them to respect hotel policy. If he did nothing, the tour guide risked the appearance of ignoring the other clients who adhered to proper etiquette and felt embarrassed by association. He also risked damage to his reputation as a tour guide, as well as damage to the professional relationship between his employer and the hotel if he did not act.

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Po-Ju Chen and Dana V. Tesone

This study identified differences of work values between two types of hospitality workforce members: hospitality industry practitioners and hospitality…

Abstract

This study identified differences of work values between two types of hospitality workforce members: hospitality industry practitioners and hospitality student/practitioners. A total of 398 nonstudent practitioners were randomly selected from various hospitality organizations to participate in this study. There were 828 student practitioners included in the data collected from a hospitality management college. Fifteen values were identified along with their hierarchical order. Three-dimensional work value structure shared by hospitality-major student/practitioners and industry practitioners were revealed. They are: General Work Values, Management Work Values, and Hospitality Work Values. The differences of the three dimensions among the four categories of student practitioners and industry practitioners were identified. Furthermore, work values were found to differ by gender. Implications are drawn for industry managers as well as educators.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-675-1

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