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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Hendrik Opdebeeck and André Habisch

The notion of compassion is a cornerstone in Chinese as well as western orientations for business practice. Spiritual and religious traditions, philosophical approaches…

Abstract

Purpose

The notion of compassion is a cornerstone in Chinese as well as western orientations for business practice. Spiritual and religious traditions, philosophical approaches and historical and present business practices outline this notion in a comparative perspective. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Interdisciplinary paper, summarizing social science, philosophical and business literature.

Findings

With its focus on compassion, business ethics in the Chinese tradition highlights a notion, which variously resonates within western traditions. Based on this, multiple lines or thought consequences for management development are derived.

Practical implications

In terms of management development the call for compassionate management can be held as a common denominator of different traditions. Therefore, it will be important to include this aspect in our management development, cultural management as well as international strategy courses.

Originality/value

In a broad interreligious and intercultural overview some basic characteristics of compassionate management can be identified.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Henri‐Claude de Bettignies, Po Keung Ip, Xuezhu Bai, André Habisch and Gilbert Lenssen

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The guest editorial introduces the papers in this special issue, focusing on practical wisdom for management from the Chinese classical traditions.

Findings

Chinese culture increasingly will permeate international culture and move from peripheral to mainstream status. To ignore this in management education would be a grave oversight.

Originality/value

The issue offers insights into the value of practical wisdom from Confucianism, the origins of Chinese classical trditions and Daoism, and the various streams of thought within the classical Chinese traditions and their contemporary relevance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Po Keung Ip

This paper aims to examine whether and to what extent the practical wisdom contained in classical Confucianism can provide conceptual and ethical resources for ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether and to what extent the practical wisdom contained in classical Confucianism can provide conceptual and ethical resources for ethical leadership for Chinese companies in the twenty‐first century. The objectives of the paper are: to reconstruct the core elements of Confucianism; to account some major issues confronting corporate China; to identify the attributes of the Confucian ethical leadership through those of Junzi against such a backdrop; to identify some major challenges for Junzi leadership in today's business environment in China; and to consider some implications of this analysis for management development and management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a normative analysis.

Findings

A critical articulation of the concept of ethical leadership based on the Confucian notion of Junzi is presented, and the concept is examined against the context of problems confronting business in China. The challenges for Confucian ethical leadership are identified in the conclusion.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a critical reference for managers who adopt or intend to adopt Confucian ideas in management.

Social implications

The paper provides a critical reference for those in society who assume leadership positions to learn about Chinese ethical leadership.

Originality/value

Few works in the literature have made the connection between Confucian ethical leadership and the Chinese corporate context with a critical approach and rigorous analysis to help reveal the inherent challenges.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Richard A. Gray

In his apocalyptic book on the environment and public policy, Timothy C. Weiskel warned of the consequences of humanity's intrusion into the biological and geo‐chemical…

Abstract

In his apocalyptic book on the environment and public policy, Timothy C. Weiskel warned of the consequences of humanity's intrusion into the biological and geo‐chemical processes of the natural world. He said that our intrusions have been massive and thorough; that they now threaten to transform ecosystemic parameters; and that unless responsible public policy directs itself toward moderating our current destructive impact on the environment, we will face ecosystemic collapse and human catastrophe “on a vastly greater scale than has ever been recorded in human history.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Yiu Chung Wong and Jason K.H. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence of civil disobedience (CD) movements in Hong Kong in the context of the notion of civil society (CS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence of civil disobedience (CD) movements in Hong Kong in the context of the notion of civil society (CS).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by rigorously defining the notion of CD, as well as the concept of CS and tracing its development in Hong Kong over the past several decades. By using a model of CS typology, which combines the variables of state control and a society’s quest for autonomy (SQA), the paper aims to outline the historical development of CD movements in Hong Kong. It also discusses the recent evolution of CS and its relationship with CD movements, particularly focusing on their development since Leung Chun-ying became the Chief Executive in 2012. Finally, by using five cases of CD witnessed in the past several decades, the relationship between the development of CS and the emergence of CD in Hong Kong has been outlined.

Findings

Four implications can be concluded: first, CD cannot emerge when the state and society are isolated. Second, the level of SC and the scale of CD are positively related. Third, as an historical trend, the development of SQA is generally in linear progress; SQA starts from a low level (e.g. interest-based and welfare-based aims) and moves upwards to campaign for higher goals of civil and political autonomy. If the lower level of SQA is not satisfied, it can lead to larger scale CD in future. Fourth, the CD movement would be largest in scale when the state-society relationship confrontational and when major cleavages can be found within CS itself.

Originality/value

This paper serves to enrich knowledge in the fields of politics and sociology.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Chan Ka Ming

Since the launch of the Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA) in 2003, Hong Kong cinema is believed to have confronted drastic changes…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the launch of the Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA) in 2003, Hong Kong cinema is believed to have confronted drastic changes. Hong Kong cinema is described to be dying, lacking creative space and losing local distinctiveness. A decade later, the rise of Hong Kong – China coproduction cinema under CEPA has been normalized and changed the once pessimism in the industry. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Hong Kong cinema adjusted its production and creation in the first 10 years of CEPA.

Design/methodology/approach

Beginning with a review of the overall development, three paradigmatic cases are examined for reflecting upon what the major industrial and commercial concerns on the Hong Kong – China coproduction model are, and how such a coproduction model is not developed as smooth as what the Hong Kong filmmakers expected.

Findings

Collectively, this paper singles out the difficulties in operation and the limit of transnationality that occur in the Chinese context for the development of Hong Kong cinema under the Hong Kong – China coproduction model.

Originality/value

This is the author’s research in his five-year study of Hong Kong cinema and it contributes a lot to the field of cinema studies with relevant industrial and policy concern.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Qian Wang and Junsheng Dou

The purpose of this paper is to find out how corporate social responsibility (CSR) is viewed in the Chinese situation. The paper views CSR as an endogenous motivation for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out how corporate social responsibility (CSR) is viewed in the Chinese situation. The paper views CSR as an endogenous motivation for corporate social behaviour. The intended contributions of this paper are twofold. On the one hand, the authors intend to collect first‐hand data to understand the current status of Chinese managers' cognitions of CSR. On the other hand the paper intends to analyse the differences which exist in managers' cognitions on CSR among different kinds of firms in a Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

A random survey was conducted among 157 businessmen using the force‐choice questionnaire, based on the four‐part construct proposed by Carroll. The confirmatory factor analysis was utilized to test the construct validity of Carroll's conceptual model with the data sample drawn from Chinese situation. Then correlation, six pairwise t‐tests and MANOVA test were conducted for the purpose of this study.

Findings

Chinese managers' cognition of CSR is found to be consistent with the four‐component construct. A relatively strong preference toward economic component has been examined. The results present a significant negative correlation between economic cognition and all three of its non‐economic counterparts. No significant cognitive differences have been verified between firms with different characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

This paper initially examined the cognition of Chinese managers toward CSR. Chinese managers are viewed as having an important role in decision making on social issues. However, how to promote the managers' cognition of CSR is needed for future research which will also examine the internal driving mechanism of CSR.

Originality/value

There has not been a great deal of empirical research done in the field of social responsibility in China. This study is a starting point for those who seek to understand the economic and sociological aspects of mainland Chinese business.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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